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Author Topic: What is the best wood glue to use ?  (Read 8581 times)

derekwarner_decoy

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #50 on: December 09, 2017, 08:17:45 PM »

 :-)) yes Daz........simply the best  O0........................... Derek
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Derek Warner

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RAAArtyGunner

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #51 on: December 09, 2017, 11:25:20 PM »

Consider this;

The only gauge of waterproofness which should always be used to check the varasity of waterproof claims, is to make up scrap joint and fully immerse it in water for over 24 hrs. O0 O0 O0
If the joint holds, no weakening, try pulling it apart, then it is waterproof, otherwise the glue is only water resistant. :-)) :-))

Let the buyer beware.
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T33cno

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #52 on: December 09, 2017, 11:27:52 PM »

Interestingly some spec sheets say water resistant whilst saying waterproof on the bottle. Deluxe Materials are guilty of this.
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tizdaz

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2017, 01:13:08 PM »

aye, ive always looked at it as: water resistant is basically splash proof, no more & waterproof as submergable.. I used this theory from when i was a child with watches! alot of wrist watches would advertise as "Water Resistant" & lots of people automatically thought "waterproof" ..but 2 totally different meanings, so be sure it clearly states Waterproof (& even then i'd still read the small print!) if you want a fully waterproof product!


As for titebond 3, its 100% waterproof (took this snippet from there website..


"What is the difference between the ANSI/HPVA Type I and Type II water-resistance specification?Both of these tests are conducted using 6 by 6 birch laminates glued together to make three-ply plywood. The test for Type I is clearly more stringent than Type II, and involves boiling the glue bonds and testing the specimens while they are wet.Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3" specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145F oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure requirements to pass the Type I specification.Type II testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 2" by 5" specimens, soaking them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 120F oven for 19 hours. This is repeated for a total of three cycles, and the bonds must not delaminate to pass the Type II specification."[/font]

Neil

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2017, 08:40:07 PM »


BUT, And it is a BIG BUT, for the model boat builder who probably puts his well built, well painted and well finished model on the lake for probably at the most I hour a week does it really matter whether the wood glue you use is waterproof or water resistant.


I have seen Marcle card models, especially the 84" SD14, completely built from card sailing happily in  the water for an hour or more, and the glue used was normal PVA.


The secret in waterproofing is not in the glue/adhesive that you use, but the finishing coating.....the paints, undercoats and finally the varnishes and finishing coats, that you put on to cover the timber that you use.............if that finish is sound, then water will not penetrate, and the time your boat is on the water is negligible in the grand scheme of things anyway.
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RAAArtyGunner

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Re: What is the best wood glue to use ?
« Reply #55 on: December 11, 2017, 01:47:56 AM »

aye, ive always looked at it as: water resistant is basically splash proof, no more & waterproof as submergable.. I used this theory from when i was a child with watches! alot of wrist watches would advertise as "Water Resistant" & lots of people automatically thought "waterproof" ..but 2 totally different meanings, so be sure it clearly states Waterproof (& even then i'd still read the small print!) if you want a fully waterproof product!


As for titebond 3, its 100% waterproof (took this snippet from there website..


"What is the difference between the ANSI/HPVA Type I and Type II water-resistance specification?Both of these tests are conducted using 6 by 6 birch laminates glued together to make three-ply plywood. The test for Type I is clearly more stringent than Type II, and involves boiling the glue bonds and testing the specimens while they are wet.Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3" specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145F oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure requirements to pass the Type I specification.Type II testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 2" by 5" specimens, soaking them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 120F oven for 19 hours. This is repeated for a total of three cycles, and the bonds must not delaminate to pass the Type II specification."[/font]

Let the buyer beware.
The above is not waterproof. Its name is Titebond and the manufactures tests are for testing for a tight bond, not a waterproof joint.
As Neil's post indicates, the finish is important, however if the finish gets a bump, say by ramming and is breached, so that water can get in to the timber, then what is the good of only four hours getting wet. In reality waterproof is probably not essential for model boaters, as the boat is not wet for long periods of time.
Manufacturers boast, you have to think smart and do your own research hence, let the buyer beware.
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