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Author Topic: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug  (Read 5062 times)

Steve Mahoney

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2016, 11:49:27 PM »

Thanks Ballastanksian, glad you're enjoying it. Attached is shot of the hook finished and painted. It's worth putting in the extra effort but doesn't seem so at the time.
Things are starting to fall into place quite quickly now. Glazed the windows without too much bother that part can be a nightmare if it goes wrong, and was able to knock out the railings in an afternoon. I had thought that they would take longer but they came together pretty easily, considering the complex form of the top rail. They are brass rod, soldered and filed clean.
All painted and glued into position so the cabin is stating to look the part.
Still deciding whether to put the canvas siding onto the flying bridge railing. Tending towards yes at the moment.
The grab rails on the real boat are stainless steel but I've upgraded my Hikurangi to polished brass. She deserves it and it goes well with the polished teak.
Lots of touching up and tweaking left to do...

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dreadnought72

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2016, 09:42:44 AM »

Very crisp - sweet lines! How did you get the prop shaft in? Would it have been easier to build the keel/framing/planking around it?


Andy
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ballastanksian

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2016, 08:41:42 PM »

Did you solder the parts whilst mounted on the roof and superstructure before removing it to fettle and paint? Otherwise your jig must have been as complex as the superstructure!

Excellent work Steve  :-))
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2016, 07:44:38 PM »

Dreadnought this one is just for display so the shaft's only about 50mm long. Just enough to let the prop spin freely. I cut out a section of the keel halfway through construction and added a short shaft tube. I probably could have planned that better. Hindsight is always 20/20.


Ballastanksian dead right. Luckily it only has 2 rails so I took a punt and made it in position. Positioned all of the stanchions and then formed and put the top rail on, doing the 4 corners first. The top rail and stanchions were held in place with tape and blocks of balsa. Then I took everything off the roof and added the lower rail. If it had been 3 rails I would normally have made a jig and used etched brass stanchions, however the real Hikurangi has welded tube railings and I wanted to match them as closely as possible. Worked out OK but more to good luck than good management.
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Steve Mahoney

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2018, 03:05:08 AM »

I've finally got the little 'Hik' back on the bench after 15 months of languishing in a cupboard. Turns out I can't work on two projects at once, had to wait to finish my last boat before I could get back onto this one.

Didn't take too long to get back up to speed, once I had figured out what was left to finish. I started working through the 'box of bits', glueing on the last remaining items, and re-aquainting myself with the model. The ventilators were printed at Shapeways - turned out alright.

This is where I'm at now. I had forgotten what nice lines the boat has. It really is a good looking hull design.

Still need to rig the derrick, install the wire railings, and the fenders are looming as a major task. I had initially thought that they were rubber but on closer inspection of the the old photos, they are rope. There are several places that sell model rope fenders but not small enough for 1/50. I experimented with a couple of ways of representing them but nothing looked even remotely decent. Looks like I'll have to make them in the traditional way thousands of tiny hitches.

That should push the eyesight to the limit.
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tigertiger

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Re: Hikurangi classic 1960s wooden tug
« Reply #30 on: March 09, 2018, 04:02:23 AM »

Lovely job  :-))
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