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Author Topic: Nottingham J class build  (Read 1909 times)

radiojoe

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2017, 09:22:56 PM »

Hi Greg, hope you are well,  just caught up with your J Class build she's looking grand, having had the privilege of working at Camper & Nicholson for 16 years I heard a lot about the J Class,  you may have seen these pics of laying the deck of Shamrock and the launch of Endeavour both at C&N a bit before my time there I'm glad to say, keep up the good work mate.  :-))

Sorry, copyright photo removed.  Admin {:-{
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SailorGreg

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #26 on: November 08, 2017, 09:05:42 AM »

Thanks for the pictures Joe, I hadn't seen them before. I count 14 men working on that deck.  Puts my little planking job into perspective!  Take care and if you fancy a drive to Hayling on a nice day, the lake is now weed free  :-))


Greg

radiojoe

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2017, 10:03:32 AM »


Yes when you see all the men on board in both photos it shows just how huge the J Class is, there was a picture on the wall of my office at C&N that showed the long gone Fore Street at Gosport where C&N had an annex yard where the J Class were layed up over winter with their bows sticking out over the walls and into the street, the picture is just one of the things I wish I had taken when C&N closed down.
Thanks for the invite I may well take you up on that, if I lived on Hayling or a lot closer there is no doubt I would still be a member, please give my regards to the rest of the gang.   :-))

Joe.
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SailorGreg

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2017, 06:02:42 PM »

Oh, that's a shame.  I doubt Camper and Nicholson's heirs would worry about the picture appearing here.  Oh well, better safe than sorry!  {:-{

Regarding my comment in my last posting about the gunwhale strip being of dubious legality, I was perusing the J class rules (oh yes, I know how to have fun!!  %% ) and came across this -
"2.2  Dimensions of the hull.   All measurements shall be taken from the outside of the fiberglass hull shell and shall
exclude any protective strips or belting around the gunwales. If used, these shall have a maximum thickness of 3mm external to the hull shell."
So it looks like my strips are perfectly legal after all.  That's good!

Greg

Capt Jack

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2017, 07:14:51 PM »

I donít what the difference is between a Nottingham and a Canterbury J Class ?, never heard of it.
My father bought a J Class in the 80ís and rebuilt it just before it was due to be scrapped, some good times were had
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SailorGreg

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #30 on: November 10, 2017, 10:25:04 PM »

The Canterbury J is the original  New Zealand design in which the lead ballast is external to the hull. The hull moulding does not have a full keel, just a stub to which the lead is bolted. The keel then needs to be faired into the hull with filler.  The Nottingham J is a purely UK development where the hull has a full keel and the ballast is fixed internally as you have seen in my build. In every other respect the two variants are identical.  Strictly, the Nottingham J does not conform to the class rules and cannot race in other countries. However, the two variants appear to race on equal terms in this country.  I hope that clarifies things.


Greg

Capt Jack

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2017, 10:44:30 PM »

Thank you.  My fathers boat didnít have the keel when he bought it, it had been cut off and the lead used for munitions for the war, when he rebuilt it he had a steel hollow keel made then 70 ton of lead ingots put in and melted to make level and the small gap between the hull and keel concreted and plated over.
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SailorGreg

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2017, 09:56:17 PM »

 I seem to have been doing lots of little jobs without any huge progress recently, but I guess they all add up to the finished boat.  Firstly, I scraped down the gunwhales with my favourite scraping tool.



I discovered a couple of places where the gluing hadnít been as effective as I might have wished,  {:-{ so I turned the hull over and ran some thin CA along the join using one of those fine tip applicators.  That seemed to do the trick, and I finished off the gunwhales without any further problems.  :-)
 
Next was finishing off the veneering of the two hatches.  Nothing too complicated about this, just a matter of measuring, cutting and sticking. The next picture shows the rudder hatch with the end pieces being glued on.  For the larger pieces where I could clamp them in place I used Titebond but I reverted to CA for the smaller fiddly bits. 




Here are both hatches fully veneered.



Then I turned to the electrics.  In hindsight, I could have done this bit before the deck went on, as it was a bit fiddly working through the hatch, but it all went OK.  First I made up the wiring outside the boat and checked my soldering was OK.


 
then made up a box from plasticard to hold the battery (a 1300 mAh 2 cell LiFe one)



The box is fastened to the piece of studding I installed to lift the boat, and the wood block attached to the top of the box is split around the hole for the studding, to be glued back together when in place.  The next picture shows the box in place and on/off switch also glued in.  The receiver will be velcroed inside the hatch coaming just above the battery.

 


With the hull nearing completion, the mast tube was extracted from its shipping tube and I prepared to drill some holes in it.  Past experience tells me that unless I am very careful at least half of these will end up in the wrong place, so I made sure I could hold the tube firm and square on the drill press table.  I sliced a piece of wood on the diagonal and glued it to a ply base to give me a trough to hold the tube steady when drilling.




This first hole formed the slot to sit on the pin at the bottom of the mast tube in the hull.  I filled the end of the tube with epoxy putty to give a bit more meat for the pin to bear on.




I spent quite a while measuring several times to make sure that everything was going to be in the right place then drilled the holes for the gooseneck fitting, spreaders and shrouds.  I am happy to say that everything ended up in the right place Ė result!  I decided to fix the shrouds internally so fed the wire through the hole in the mast (which had been elongated slightly to allow the wire to exit the mast at about the correct angle) and out the top of the tube.  I cut a ferrule in half (just roll the thin aluminium tube under a scalpel blade) and doubled the wire through it.  Pull the wire back inside the mast and thatís it.  (Obviously, crimp the ferrule tight on the wire first!)

 


I have also put the first coat of Danish oil on the woodwork, and the next picture is what the hull currently looks like.




All of a sudden the end is in sight Ė well, just over the horizon anyway.  ;)
 
Greg


PS - I have used the new MBM image hosting for this post.  It's great to be able to embed the images in the text rather than having all of them after the words.  Well done Martin!!  :-)) :-)) :-)) :-)) :-))
 

SailorGreg

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2017, 10:04:28 PM »

A note to Capt Jack - what was the name of the boat your father rescued?  J's are pretty rare beasts, and I assume it is still sailing? The only two I am aware of that have been recovered in this country are Velsheda and Endeavour - are you lucky enough to be associated with one of those?

Capt Jack

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #34 on: November 14, 2017, 10:16:24 PM »

Yes, it was the Velsheda he saved. It was a very enjoyable time. Sadly he doesnít own it anymore but a great achievement to save her, she was about to be cut up just before he bought her.
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radiojoe

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Re: Nottingham J class build
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2017, 10:24:29 PM »


Nice going Greg, she looks every inch an elegant J Class.  :-))


Joe.
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