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Author Topic: soldering  (Read 405 times)

steveo-73

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soldering
« on: October 13, 2017, 03:14:58 PM »

Hi fellow boaters,


I haven't been on here for a long time due to family commitments. But now I have the chance again I have put myself back into RC Boating again!!


I'm still a amateur/novice when it comes to this and I have 2 electric boats, one being a Proboat Impulse 31 V2 the other a Proboat Miss Geico 29. My question to you all is one I asked about 3 years ago and apologies too anybody who kindly replied. We had a baby and I never got back to this until now lol.


I live in Peterborough and I would like to change my connectors both on my Lipo Batteries and My boats to EC5 connectors. At the moment my Batteries are EC3s, One Boat is EC3 and the Other is Deans but as I would like to run 6s I've been told that EC5 would be a safer option. So i'm in need of some help with soldering??


I can confess that I am not the best at DIY or Electrical Work so I would really appreciate if their was anybody local to me who would like to help me with my issue. I'm sure I can make it worth your while....


Great to be back


Steve
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Ianlind

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Re: soldering
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2017, 06:42:22 AM »

G'day steve,


Have you looked at XT60 Connectors? Easy to solder to and as fitted to everything I have in both cars and boats and batteries.


Ian.
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Paul2407

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Re: soldering
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2017, 09:39:09 AM »

Like Ianlind says try XT60 connectors, don't be temped with deans connectors I'm quite competant at soldering but those little things are terrible
with any soldering you must use flux on each componant being soldered and get enough heat through the connector as that is the key to any soldering

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Inertia

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Re: soldering
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2017, 10:29:08 AM »

Sorry to disagree but I wouldn't recommend using a separate flux for electrical/electronic soldering. Buy a 60/40 tin/lead solder with integral rosin core flux like this stuff https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B073ZJW3DQ?psc=1
The trouble with a separate flux is that it's messy; you may apply too much and then have to wash off the excess, and you might just get hold of something that's acidic - that spells doom for any electrical joint.
There are a lot of videos on You Tube showing how to make electrical solder joints - interestingly Americans always seem to say "sodder".
Here's an extract from an article in 'Model Boats' magazine:
Soldering
This is the single most terrifying aspect to fitting out model boats with electrics, if my correspondence is anything to judge by. You wouldnít believe the lengths to which some folk will go to avoid soldering, yet itís very easy if you follow the rules and use the right tools and materials.
For general soldering use a 15 to 25 Watt mains voltage electric iron. Fancy little gas-powered torches are barely useful for any electrical soldering except field repairs, but they are excellent for browning crŤme brŻlťe! I donít use one for anything electrical myself. For heavy-duty cable, i.e. anything thicker than 18AWG, a 40 to 80 Watt iron is better, especially if it has a decent-sized flat tip fitted (4.2mm or wider). I have used a soldering gun which heats up very quickly, but is too hot and cumbersome to use for most electrical work. Solder wire comes in two sizes; 18SWG and 22SWG. I prefer to use the thinner type for all joints, as you can feed it into a heated joint without the risk of flooding the joint with excess solder. Choose solder with a lead content, as itís easier to use than lead-free, and a resin flux core. NEVER use an acidic flux for electrical soldering. The other major rules are:
1)
Always make sure that the work is totally clean and degreased before you try to solder it.

2)
Wherever possible, hold the two pieces to be joined together with non-ferrous clamps or similar before applying the iron.

3)
Never carry solder to the joint on the iron tip.

4)
Wipe away excess solder from the tip of the iron with a damp sponge regularly and never take a file to the tip of a soldering iron or youíll destroy any special coating it may have.

5)
Always scrub off any excess flux from the joint afterwards. Methylated Spirits or Isopropyl Alcohol are OK, but a proprietary aerosol circuit board cleaner such as Wartonís Total Clean 200 is best.

6)
A good solder joint should be clean and shiny-bright. If it looks grey and dull then the chances are itís what we call a 'dry joint' and will neither conduct electricity properly nor physically hold together for very long. If in any doubt remake the joint.

So now you have no excuses.
How do I know? I've been assembling a range of model boat electronics units since 2007 and I would guess that's something like half a million soldered joints.
O - and I use Deans connectors but there's nothing wrong with X60's. I'd probably go over to them if I didn't have so many batteries, switches and chargers with the Deans fitted.

DM
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steveo-73

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Re: soldering
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2017, 10:38:51 AM »

Thanks for all the comments guys...the only reason I was going to use ec5 was just what I've been told about 5mm bullets connectors being the way to go but it's not definite as I have one boat as dean's the other ec3 so changing to x60s wouldn't be a problem.


Having the space and time trying to keep a 3.5 year old out of the way is another matter. Not having a garage don't help so that's really the only reason oh yeah and I've never tried I was asking if someone local new or could offer me a soldering service temporarily until I get something sorted.


Thanks again.
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Paul2407

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Re: soldering
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2017, 11:49:15 AM »

Always used separate solder/flux for last 35 years and not had any issues with a bad joint, I suppose it's what you are used to but I stick with what I know and can only comment on that  :-)) but maybe I will try flux core solder in the future
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