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Author Topic: Wood Sizes  (Read 375 times)

skierdive

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Wood Sizes
« on: November 14, 2017, 07:00:48 PM »

Hello Everyone I have a Beginner's Question. Which may have a simple answer but, here goes.


I've bought a few boat plans which, hopefully one day I'll use to actually build a boat from. But for now I'm just studying them so as to gain a bit more insight into how a boat is put together and for the fact that I just like the way they look. ( I can't help it  :-) ) As these plans are mainly "vintage", all measurements are "imperial".


My question is, how do I go about converting "Imperial Measurements" to "Metric" equivalents? Or in fact, do I have to? Is wood ( as I am mainly interested in wood) sold in "imperial" sizes anymore?


Is there a Standard Conversion formula that is used? or am I at the mercy of the various suppliers?


I've only had a quick look around the tinterweb but I've already noticed that one supplier sells


 Lite Ply measuring  3 mm  or  1/8"    and   6 mm  or  1/4"   and
Balsa  measuring     3.2 mm or 1/8"   and   6.5 mm or 1/4"


Or does it depend on the type of wood that is being supplied?


Or, I've just had a sudden thought. Does anybody sell plans that have been converted from "Imperial" to "Metric"?


I'm sorry, I do realise that this is more than one question  :-)


Thanks very much,
Ian.

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[size=78%]        [/size]
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ChrisF

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 09:02:56 PM »


Hi Ian

Imperial or metric, it's still the same size! So yes, a simple answer. 1" to 1 foot for example is 1:12 and if working in metric just scale off the plans in mm or cm. If there are any dimensions (other than timber thickness) you want to convert there are plenty of online converters or use a tape with both imperial and metric markings.

The only time you have to worry about imperial or metric is if you are say producing drawings for a building. A common scale was 1/4" to 1 foot (1:48) if in imperial and 1:50 in metric which are slightly different and you needed the corresponding scale rules to draw them. The difference here is that the plans are being drawn at a smaller scale to build something bigger whereas with a model (unless you want to alter the size) you are building at the same size as the drawings.

When working with a straight scale/ratio e.g. 1:12, 1:8 or smaller it doesn't matter what you work in.

Hope this helps.

As far as the timber sizes go just get the closest you can.


Chris
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BrianB6

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2017, 09:30:11 PM »

Chris, he is asking about wood sizes not scales.
Unfortunately America still uses imperial sizes so anything made for their market is in inches.
Some markets like U.K.use both.  %%
The rest of us are stuck with the French system and use metric millimetres.
All you can do is use the nearest equivalent size you can get.  :((
1/8" = 3.2 mm.   1" = 25.5 mm
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ChrisF

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2017, 09:43:07 PM »

Brian, you are of course right. What set me off down that path was Ian asking if any one sells plans converted from imperial to metric.

It's not even a wine night!

Chris
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dougal99

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2017, 10:24:49 PM »



Is there a Standard Conversion formula that is used? or am I at the mercy of the various suppliers?



No and yes in that order.


1/8" is 3.2mm but the nearest metric wood is 3mm and so on. If you are scratch building you will need to cut your wood to the length on the plan. Measurements taken off with dividers don't change metric or imperial. Thicknessess may require a little maths to adjust the fit. That's half the fun of scratch building.


Good luck.
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tigertiger

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 04:18:08 AM »

Remember that working with wood is not often precise and wood also swells and thickness varies seasonally, and so the difference between, for example, 3mm and 3.2mm is negligible.
The thicknesses for frames/bulkheads is not to scale (usually) and is just a thickness that won't distort during or after construction. The thickness of planks is rarely to scale, but the combined width of a frame plus the plank is usually to get the exterior hull profile right, according to the plan. Remember most plans are not 100% accurate copies of the original boat dimensions scaled down. The width of the plank can also vary a little as most planking is to construct the hull shape. The exact number of planks from keel to gunwale is rarely to scale.
The same is true for superstructure. The thickness of material quoted is right for the job, i.e. strong enough. You could even use materials much thicker, and if you allow for this, and correct to get the exterior dimensions the same, all is well.


In short, what I am trying to say is that the thicknesses of material given on the plan is not critical, if you want to convert measurements then you only really need to convert lengths and widths of components.
My 2c. Hope this helps
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grendel

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 08:26:47 AM »

since I mostly buy bigger bits of timber, and rip them down to the size I need on the table saw, the finished size is whatever i want it to be, flat pieces are whatever plywood is nearest, then everything else is adjusted to suit.
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radiojoe

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 09:42:14 AM »


A very good supplier of quality plywoods and strip timber for model makers is   www.slec.co.uk  they also list the sizes in both imperial and metric. :-))

Joe
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chas

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 03:19:05 PM »

Hi skierdive, in other words, common sense applies. The main thing with wood builds like yours, is to make sure the grain runs the best way for the part being cut. i.e. grain across the beam for a bulkhead. (usually)
 That way the strength is where you need it. There are exceptions for every rule, but useing common sense will keep you on the right path.
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skierdive

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2017, 05:55:12 PM »

Thank you, All
For your answers and suggestions/ ideas.
I found your answer on "Scale" very helpful, as I have struggled to get my head around that aspect of modelling.


I have read elsewhere that care needs to be taken when taking measurements from plans or making templates from them as there are can be a few inaccuracies that could lead to a lop sided build. I can appreciate that the fun of the build is enhanced by deciding the type /size of material that will be used and then "fettling" it to make it fit and look right and that the finished model will be your own personal interpretation. leading, I hope, to no two models of the same design being exactly the same. I already know that my skill level and desire wont enable me to build true "scale" models but, I presume that these are only really needed if they are going to withstand the scrutiny of say, a Hollywood film set. I will be more than happy if my model just looks "right".


Thank you all again,
Ian






       
 
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radiojoe

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Re: Wood Sizes
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2017, 06:54:13 PM »

 It's all about having fun and if you end up with a model that you are happy with that's all that matters. :-))


Joe
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