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Author Topic: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial  (Read 140001 times)

oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2010, 08:53:57 PM »

Hi John,
    It is great that you are taking on this task - can you cover these topics as well?

Dave

 Dave:

  I'll  answer to brands I know and the difference between different types of brushes. There are, obviously, certain brands I haven't had experience with, but I've used the most common different types.

John
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2010, 09:24:13 PM »

Thanks for volunteering, John :-)). I'm sure many people will learn from your expertise, me included.

Peter.
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Martin13

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2010, 09:53:31 PM »



Looking forward to this.
I have touch up guns, normal spray guns etc which I can use quite proficiently but Airbrushes are a whole new ball game and I have a few.....

Will keep a keen eye on this post - thanks John in advance

Mdu
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longshanks

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #28 on: December 21, 2010, 10:00:08 PM »

Thanks John

I'm going to enjoy this  :-))
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2010, 10:12:14 PM »

  Thanks for everyone for your support. I'm adding the various topic requests to my list. Hopefully i'll be able to answer everyone's questions. As Martin indicated I'll start after Christmas. I'll post a "course outline" based on the topics requested, then we'll see how we make out.

John
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number-1

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #30 on: December 21, 2010, 10:29:36 PM »

Looking forward for this, Im going to buy an airbrush in the new year, so any pointers as to what to get would be great.

merry christmas.
Les.
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davidm1945

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #31 on: December 21, 2010, 11:25:04 PM »

Thanks John,
            This is the best part of Mayhem, where people can share their expertise with us mere mortals. Something to look forward to in the new year!

Dave.
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tt1

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #32 on: December 27, 2010, 09:26:30 PM »

Champing at the bit for this one John, can't wait. I have a Paasche single action external mix brush with 3 air caps with both gravity cup and bottles and a TC20T 3.5 ltr compressor, I'd love to give 'em the benefit of usage!   O0

I'd like to learn more about most suitable paints, thinning for the right consistency especially when spraying into those awkward corners, tips on storage, mixing, and even transferring paint from those little tinlets would be great.   :-))
                                                                      Regards, Tony.
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #33 on: December 27, 2010, 09:33:15 PM »

and even transferring paint from those little tinlets would be great.   :-))
                                                                      Regards, Tony.

Thats simple.... I use eye droppers sourced from my local Pharmacy.  If you ask nicely they will probably give you a handful of old ones.  Need to wash them thoroughly tho
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wibplus

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #34 on: December 27, 2010, 09:33:58 PM »

After much careful thought and a lot of research, I took the plunge and bought a second hand compressor and a new airbrush. Cant wait to learn how to start using it.  O0   %%

Chomping at the bit.   O0   :embarrassed:   :-)
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #35 on: December 27, 2010, 11:48:24 PM »

Me too!   :-))
           I've bought a new airbrush in the sales...... tried it out today!  %)
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #36 on: December 28, 2010, 12:32:38 AM »

Looks good Martin......for weathering. I think you've thinned the paint a little too much to properly make that tire white though. Of course, iif you're trying for white walls, you should really consider masking, O0

John
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RaaArtyGunner

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #37 on: December 28, 2010, 10:27:17 AM »

Looks like he might be wearing a mask  O0 O0 %) %) %)

In meantime roll on the tutorial
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #38 on: December 29, 2010, 12:39:47 AM »

  Well folks, Christmas is over. Just finished a nice lunch with my daughter and wife at the top of the CN Tower in Toronto. Excellent meal, excellent service and a great view.......including
 watching a self unloading laker maneuver into the Redpath Sugar dock.
   Time to get moving on this airbrush tutorial. As I said before, I'm posting a "course outline" to begin with. I believe I've encompassed the requests made by all in the initial postings. I'm going to cover each numbered topic on a minimum once a week basis. That way I can field questions originating from what's been written, and it gives me time to get the next section done properly, with pictures.
  As I mentioned at the start, I've custom painted model railway equipment, primarily, for over ten years. I did it both for hobby stores and for my own client base. Eye sight weakening as a result of age has caused me to stop doing it commercially, however, I still do my own work. During that time I developed techniques that served me well, and most importantly, repeatedly, to the satisfaction of my customers. I'm going pass on what i know here. There are many other extremely competent painters out there and hopefully they'll be able to put some of their ideas forth here. Stavros mentioned "Voyageur", as an example. His weathering was fabulous. Maybe he can add to some of the areas in this tutorial.
  Throughout this tutorial you will, no doubt, come across terms and products that may not be available out of North America, or a re called a different name from what we are familiar with. If so,  speak up and we'll try and sort the language out.
  Here, now is the "course outline". I'm going t try and get the first installment out later this week. Also some pictures of what I've done in the past.

John

P.S.

  .......and one picture for Stavros (knowing he's a body man) , a picture of my truck that I rebuilt and spray painted myself with an HVLP gun. Not an airbrush, but it was quite an experience.

MAYHEM AIRBRUSH TUTORIAL

Course Outline

1)   types of airbrushes Ė external mix, internal mix, single acting, double acting, advantages, disadvantages, manufacturers commonly used
2)   paint containers Ė bottle, open cup, use of, advantage and disadvantage
3)   parts of an airbrush and how to disassemble it, cleaning brush, troubles to look for and how to correct
4)   air supply Ė compressor, aerosol can, other, pressures to use
5)   air brush safety Ė ventilation, breathing protection
6)   types of paints that can be used, advantages and disadvantages of different types, how to mix same and thinners to use
7)   spraying with an airbrush Ė basic airbrush handling during spraying, different patterns, how to get them, how to get proper coverage from an airbrush
8)   how and when to mask the object to be sprayed, types of masking, how to make them, tips and techniques
9)   proper decaling techniques for models, using other forms of lettering methods on models
10)    other tips on model painting and finishing. Ė including weathering techniques

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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2010, 01:09:27 AM »

......some boat related pics. My Smit Nederland.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #40 on: December 30, 2010, 03:20:25 AM »

TYPES OF AIR BRUSHES


  Air brushes may be broken down into internal and external mix air brushes, while the internal mix variety may be broken down into single stage and two stage air brushes. Each of these varieties have there purpose. As in all tools, some do well at some jobs and poor at others.

  What is the difference between and internal and external mix brush?
This term is relative to where the air and paint is mixed in, or out of, a brush. An external mix brush is the simplest design in that the paint and air is mixed outside. This design of brush can be likened to blowing air across the top of a straw. The action of the air blowing over the straw reduces the air pressure within the straw and raises the paint mix from the receptacle, up the straw and to the tip of the straw where the passing air blows the paint on the surface to be painted. As the description indicates, this is a very basic brush. It is not ideal for doing fine detail work and certainly not for doing lining. The paint doesnít atomize into fine droplets and can come out in blobs if not careful.  This brush is good for a beginner. They are generally much cheaper than other brush types. If you are covering large areas without the concern for the finer detail, they can do a decent job of this. Just be sure youíve done a set up on a test piece of material before attacking your favourite model. In our marine applications these could be used for painting the hull in your usual choice of hull colours. It covers the larger area well and quickly. If the paint is thinned correctly it should go on reasonably thinly and, since most hulls donít have a great amount of detail compared to the superstructure, it doesnít hide a lot of detail.

  An internal mix brush mixes the paint and air inside the brush. As with the external mix brush the paint can be drawn up a straw from a jar due to reduced air pressure caused by the fast moving air, or the paint can be drawn from a paint cup. Some cups are designed to fit on top of the brush, while others are designed to fit in place of the paint jar. The type on top of the brush will allow paint down to the brush by gravity. This type uses less air pressure an volume compared to the type that draws the pint up from a jar or cup.

  Because the paint is mixed internally to the brush, right at the tip of the brush, much more control is achievable over the atomization and volume of the paint coming from the brush. A very finely tapered needle goes through a matching orifice. This fine restriction breaks down the paint into very fine droplets, assuming correct thinning for the type of paint used. This paint is ideally suited to fine work where paint quantity and application direction is crucial. However, the internal mix brush may be broken down into a single stage and two stage brush.

  The single stage brush has a button, or plunger, on the top of the brush body. When the painterís finger depresses this  button more or less air will be drawn into the brush and , consequently determine when the pint will be drawn into the brush.. The control can be precise for the application needed. The quantity of the paint is made by a separate adjustment at the rear of the brush body. By moving this adjustment in or out  it moves the needle in or out of the fine orifice. Withdrawing the needle from the tapered orifice allows more paint through the brush for the air applied. Moving the needle in reduces the paint volume. One draw back of this design, in certain applications, is the fact the volume of paint canít be adjusted while depressing the air valve when actually painting an object. For the majority of our model applications this isnít a concern. We set the paint amount to that desired to paint a certain surface and can make any readjustments while we stop between strokes.

 For those who do graphics, such as fancy images on cars or motorcycles, this isnít acceptable. For them the two stage brush was designed to be able to adjust the paint quantity and air flow at the same time. This way images could be drawn (painted) that faded one to the other, lines of varying widths could be laid out with the mere adjustment of the fore finger. The two stage brush does this by moving the paint needle in and out with the forward and backward motion of the button on the top of the brush body, while depressing the same to allow air into the brush to draw and spray the paint. This type of brush could be used on model work, indeed, Iím sure many of the excellent military modellers use this form of brush for the weathering and camouflage painting on their vehicles.

 Because of the dual action it can be difficult to maintain an even spray over large areas, the dual action brush is more designed for quick changes and relatively small amounts of paint. The choice is the painterís, however, for myself, I prefer the single action brush.

  There are a number of manufacturers of these types of brushes. Badger and Revell are common in the modelling business;
however, Paasche and Bliss are common in the more professional paining arenas.


  This begins the introduction to airbrushing. Part (2) next.

John

 ........more pictures to follow .........



INTERNAL MIX, DOUBLE ACTION BADGER AIR BRUSH - (credit Badger Air Brush web site)



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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2010, 11:15:02 AM »

Great Stuff John!  :-))

Everyone feel free to ask questions and make observations, we'll ediit it all all as we go (or afterwards) so that the tutorial stands apart for eaase of referance
.
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #42 on: December 30, 2010, 03:24:05 PM »

  Here are some pictures of my brushes that illustrate the types I was referring to above.




  This is the single action, internal mixing Badger 200 air brush. I've had, and used this one for most of my painting. Its about 30 years old now. They can be rebuilt. Badger carries all the parts for them. they are rugged and consistent when cared for.
_________________________________________





  This is the Badger 250 external mixing air brush. They are cheap. Not good for fine work, but are adequate to cover large areas quickly. This unit is moving on to 40 years old now.
_________________________________________






  This is a De Vilbiss internal mixing, 2 stage air brush with a permanently installed gravity feed cup. These are great for art work, small detail work, and close in quarters where a large volume of paint isn't required. Can be very handy for weathering and such.

John
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #43 on: December 30, 2010, 05:13:42 PM »


Thanks John,

Someone that's going out to buy a new airbrush for the first time, what should we look for and/or ovoid?
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #44 on: December 30, 2010, 05:34:09 PM »


Thanks John,

Someone that's going out to buy a new airbrush for the first time, what should we look for and/or ovoid?


  For your first brush I'd go for something not too expensive, however, I would want some thing that can reasonably do the type of painting I want to work up to. For that reason I wouldn't select the external mixing brush such as the Badger 250 in the photographs. I did that route when I started and I rapidly found that my skill level overtook the brushes ability to do what I wanted. Its not that I'm a quick learner, quite the contrary, but doing air brushing isn't as hard as some people fear. Therefore we all tend to pick it up quickly once tried. With that in mind I'd tend to start with one of the internal mix, single stage brushes. Its simple to use, gives a good finish and only has one control to get used to handling when you're starting out. If you find your skill level improves to go to a double action, and the kind of painting you're expecting to be doing works better with it, then move up to a double action internal mix. The first purchase brush won't go wasted, you'll still find plenty of work for it over the years, but your skill level will have allowed you to increase your tool repertoire and therefore, the quality of product you put out.

John
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RaaArtyGunner

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #45 on: December 30, 2010, 08:57:21 PM »

  For your first brush I'd go for something not too expensive, however, I would want some thing that can reasonably do the type of painting I want to work up to. For that reason I wouldn't select the external mixing brush such as the Badger 250 in the photographs. I did that route when I started and I rapidly found that my skill level overtook the brushes ability to do what I wanted. Its not that I'm a quick learner, quite the contrary, but doing air brushing isn't as hard as some people fear. Therefore we all tend to pick it up quickly once tried. With that in mind I'd tend to start with one of the internal mix, single stage brushes. Its simple to use, gives a good finish and only has one control to get used to handling when you're starting out. If you find your skill level improves to go to a double action, and the kind of painting you're expecting to be doing works better with it, then move up to a double action internal mix. The first purchase brush won't go wasted, you'll still find plenty of work for it over the years, but your skill level will have allowed you to increase your tool repertoire and therefore, the quality of product you put out.

John

John,

 :-)) :-))
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longshanks

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #46 on: December 30, 2010, 09:32:19 PM »

Excellent !!

Going to enjoy this thread  :-))
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Stavros

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #47 on: December 30, 2010, 09:33:31 PM »

My Appologies Olidiron I had totally forgotten who the other airbrush Genius was,when i posted that Voyager was good to do this tutorial I knew there was someone else on the forum who was Brillaint at the craft.
I myself cant wait to read all about it.Yes I am a fully quallified paint sprayer BUT Tell me ...who is NEVER to old to learn something NEW let alone be reminded of the baisics,so far it is absoloutly brillaint keep up the good work


Stav
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #48 on: December 30, 2010, 11:41:25 PM »

My Appologies Olidiron I had totally forgotten who the other airbrush Genius was,when i posted that Voyager was good to do this tutorial I knew there was someone else on the forum who was Brillaint at the craft.
I myself cant wait to read all about it.Yes I am a fully quallified paint sprayer BUT Tell me ...who is NEVER to old to learn something NEW let alone be reminded of the baisics,so far it is absoloutly brillaint keep up the good work


Stav

  Stavros:
 No apologies necessary. As you say, we can all learn something no matter what the age. I find that by teaching I learn more myself which is very handy. I don't know if you remember, but we met at the Warrington model boat show in 2009.  I was there with ggeorge and we talked about TID tugs and things.
 i agree, Voyager is certainly qualified, he puts out some great work, especially his weathering.

Thanks
John
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Stavros

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #49 on: December 30, 2010, 11:52:41 PM »

Yes i never forget a face,it was so nice to have met you in person


Stav
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