Model Boat Mayhem

Masterclasses => Bryan's Northumbrian => Topic started by: Bryan Young on August 19, 2008, 05:17:21 PM

Title: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 19, 2008, 05:17:21 PM
This is a bit of an unexpected bonus for me. Around 10 years ago I built a glass hull of the old Tyne ferry "Northumbrian" for a fellow club member. The idea at the time was to build 2 of the old ferries (different, but on the same hull) and have them trotting across the lake passing each other in the middle. The other chap died not long after the 1st hull was done and the hull and mould sort of disappeared with him. It recently re-emerged and has been returned to me. Its condition is exactly how it was when it came out of the mould. Never been cleaned up or touched in any way. My then "partner" wanted the pair of them to be built at 1:24 (0.5" /ft) as he wished to have a couple of "Double Tens" installed, whereas I was going the electric route. After his death I discovered that he had destroyed the mould, but kept the hull...thereby preventing the 2nd hull being built. So I lost interest in the project. Now that I have the hull back, I am re-kindling my original interest. I have never been interested in having 2 projects on the go at the same time, but I may make an exception in this case.
In the first 2 pics the hull is sitting on one of those council recycling boxes, and I'm sure most of us know how big they are. The hull is 58" x 17" x 7" and will have a draught of around 2.5", which will give an all-up weight of around 87lb (gulp). That probably means somewhere in the region of 50lb ballast. I really do choose the simple options!
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: polobeer on August 19, 2008, 06:30:57 PM
That's going to be one very interesting model there Bryan! Keep us posted with developments.

All the best
Simon  :o
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 19, 2008, 06:53:19 PM
Thanks, but I still think it looks like a turtle!. A question for you Londoners...does it resemble any of the old Woolwich ferries? I haven't done much research on this as yet, but I know she was built far away to the south of Geordieland in a strange country of which we know little but probably ends in "sex" as do most of these foreign lands.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Barry on August 24, 2008, 02:28:12 AM
The Northumbrian was built in 1930 by Hawthorn, Leslie and Co., of Hebburn. for thr Tyne Improvement Commission. Last heard of as a floating restaurant in Gateshead in 1976. The Tyne and Wear archives have her plans. GA drawing is DS/HL/230/7.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 25, 2008, 05:26:58 PM
The Northumbrian was built in 1930 by Hawthorn, Leslie and Co., of Hebburn. for thr Tyne Improvement Commission. Last heard of as a floating restaurant in Gateshead in 1976. The Tyne and Wear archives have her plans. GA drawing is DS/HL/230/7.
Just got a more or less complete set of the drawings. But there is still a bit of a debate. My drawings sort of indicate the boat is "Tynemouth" and not "Northumbrian". It would appear that sometime during the lifespan of both ferries the vehicle "run-around" was removed and the foot passenger area enlarged. The funnel of "Tynemouth" was also shorter and squatter than my early drawings of "Northumbrian" show. So I guess the final model may well be a bit of a half-breed. Not to worry. There is still enough there to keep me happy for a while. I also think I made a dit of a horlix with regard to the final weight. The draught is not 2.5" but nearer 4" which puts the AUW nearer 110lb. Ah, well..... BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 30, 2008, 10:19:11 PM
Those of you who read my "bit" on the rudder layout of the "General Havelock" may recall that she was a single screw ship, and so had a "transom" of full height and therefore not all that difficult as far as fitting the rudder was concerned. This ferry is twin screw with a single rudder. Basically it is an early version of a modern "hanging" rudder. Common now, but in 1929 it must have been a bit of a novelty.
It would be pretty easy to make and fit a non-removable rudder, but accidents happen so this one has to be detachable. The first drawback was the "bent" rudder stock and the "L" shape at the bottom of the transom. So I cut off the "L" and made the rudder stock straight. In pic 1 the "red" is how it is, and the "green" is how it was. As yet I haven't attached the stiffening straps.
Some while ago someone was asking about cutting slots into a tube. Pic 2 should show my way. I jam a tight fitting dowel up the tube to prevent distortion and drill small guide holes at the end of the slots.Then using a hand held drill with the cutter fitted carefully cut the slots. The solder fills up the odd gaps!.
Pic 3 shows the main components, most of which are of 5mm "Lexan" or "Perspex" that I scavenge from wherever. No glue is used, it is all bolted together...just "in case...."
Pic 4 just shows how it all fits together. The angle brackets fit inside the hull so the outside stays smooth. All sealed in of course. More pics when fitted, sealed and painted.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 30, 2008, 10:28:35 PM
Just as I was getting used to the 256k postings it all gets changed again. Try no.3.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 30, 2008, 10:30:20 PM
Missed one;
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Barry on September 04, 2008, 02:02:33 AM
The Shipbuilder of November 1923 has an article on the Tynemouth featuring G.A drawings. It shows smaller upperworks then the Northunbrian. The Tynemouth was built by Messrs. Phillip and Son, Ltd., of Dartmouth.
Attached some rather poor photos of three of the Tyne ferries, you can, hopefully, see the differences in the upperworks. The hulls look similar to each other.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 07, 2008, 05:03:36 PM
The Shipbuilder of November 1923 has an article on the Tynemouth featuring G.A drawings. It shows smaller upperworks then the Northunbrian. The Tynemouth was built by Messrs. Phillip and Son, Ltd., of Dartmouth.
Attached some rather poor photos of three of the Tyne ferries, you can, hopefully, see the differences in the upperworks. The hulls look similar to each other.
Thanks for the interest Barry. I recently got hold of a more or less complete set of plans....but it only took a cursory glance to realise I had plans for 2 different boats. But, as you say, the hulls are the same and so I can continue with the construction from the main deck downwards. The "wing" deck and bulwarks etc. look to be the same on both boats....in fact the only big difference is in the superstructure. I have some new pics (taken today after the rain stopped and the GP was finished) that I shall play with and post soonest. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 07, 2008, 06:54:44 PM
Pics in sequence:-
2321....This is the ply deck with "wings" fitted over the hull in pic 2303 (go back a bit). The marked area is going to be the removeable part. The bits of curved wood are the bearers for the "false deck" to give the deck a camber.
2319.... This only shows how far the "wing deck" projects beyond the hull.
2318....The "false deck" applied and cut to allow the removeable part to fit on to the (black) landing.
2324.... Removeable part inserted just for "fit".
2326....False deck laid over. Area inside broad line is the removeable bit. Or at least, it will be.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 17, 2008, 08:50:35 PM
Time for a small update on the build. Still not too sure if it is going to be "Tynemouth" or "Northumbrian" but at this stage, who cares?
For quite a while now I have been scanning the "Proxxon" catalogue and was always sort of tempted by the miniature jig-saw. No, not the sort that 5 year-olds click together...the proper one. Using the "mainstream" sort of saw always struck me as being a bit too "Industrial" if you see what I mean. So I have now bought one, and at £32 is a little gem. Should have bought it ages ago. Check it out. Lovely smooth cuts on 1.5mm ply and so on.
Anyway. After much pondering and metaphorical gnashing of teeth I realised that the build couldn't go ahead without the wing-decks and associated bits being done first...even though the "bits" would have to be removable to allow later fittings to be fitted.
One problem always leads to another. The "wings" are obviously going to take a lot of battering and so needed beefing up a bit for a model. Image 6 shows my solution. The steel angle brackets will (or should) take a lot of punishment and the "notches" are to take the timber bulwark uprights. The steel takes the weight off the more easily smashed timber.
Image 5 may give an idea as to how large the wing-deck overhang is. Take no notice of the painted "waterline"....that is only there for me to mark things on...the old eyesight can no longer differentiate a black mark on a black hull. (Another penalty of ageing!)
Image 4 shows the rough idea of how the timber bulwark uprights fit into the scheme of things.
The wing sheathing will have to be laminated with either 3 or 4 layers of 1.5mm ply to get around the hull contours (I think it will be 4 layers). But also, the sheathing tapers from 2" (model size) amidships ro less than 1" at the ends...thats why the steel brackets need at this stage to removeable...so I can trim them down. I've struggled to make a cardboard template for this and will appear on the next posting....whenever that may be.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 02, 2008, 07:48:29 PM
This is a quite interesting photo of "Northumbrian" taken in the late 60's / early 70's. Not so much for the ferry itself (although that is my prime interest), but for the ships in the background. They are at the old Brigham & Cowan yard at South Shields. The inboard ship seems to be a P&O cargo ship, but the interesting one is the "Sapele Palm". This has got to be one of the very few pics I hav seen of what appears to be joggled plating (expensive to build), but then there is a transition to flush plating around the back end. Very odd. The photo also shows how old some of the "lower order" ships were. Chapmans and Hogarths come to mind. (No reflection on those who sailed in them!).
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: John W E on October 02, 2008, 08:14:55 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=1uRle5CbpWs

 O0
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 03, 2008, 07:26:31 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=1uRle5CbpWs

 O0
Thank you. Interesting stuff. I live and learn. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on November 28, 2008, 04:19:40 PM
It's been awhile since the last update but the assembly of the fendering around the wing deck and the building of the bulwarks has been very time consuming...mainly because of "glue-drying" time. The "real" ferries were pretty crude and more than a little scruffy. Even when they were fresh out of "refit" they looked like they needed another one. So although the model will be as accurate as I can make it I'm not going down the pristine model route. The huge fender strakes around the wing deck is laminated up with 3 layers of 1.5mm ply with the 3rd (outer) layer laid in seperate planks with the edges slightly chamfered to give a bit of contrast, these planks are 3/8" wide, on top of all that there are yet more "doubling" layers placed where "portable" fenders are sited (old tyres / rope things etc.)
I'm still trying to work out a reliable and efficient way of getting the vehicle ramps to work, so these are not yet fitted, but the elongated slots in the deck show the placement.
The 0.25" square (6"in real life) bulwark stays came next. These bulwarks were very high (a good 4') and very substantial. I have continued them down inside the wing deck fender strake and the whole unit is now as solid as the proverbial outhouse. The bulwarks themselves are of seperate 0.25" wide planks. Fortunately I had fitted the running gear before I fitted the bulwark stays as now they are fitted it is a very dodgy procedure turnin the model upside down! Still has to be done though as the volume between the hull proper and the fendering still needs sealing and painting. Unless I do it with the aid of a big mirror...but I don't fancy that.
The aft fairleads are 4 suitable "O" rings and the anchor davit is a spare lifeboat davit left over from "Baroda". Nice change to find an item ready made for once. (Aluminium knitting needle again).
The final pic is really just to show how much access to the interior I have, and to show the handles I use for heaving a bulky boat in / out of the water (Maplins, about a fiver each). The bulkheads and motor mounts are secured in place with "hairy filler"...and the steel ruler on the deck is a 12" item.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Martin [Admin] on November 28, 2008, 10:49:20 PM
WoW, look at the size of that thing!!!!  :o
In the vernacular of da yoots 'o today, "Way to go Brian!"
(I think he's going to need a  fork lift truck!)  ok2
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on November 29, 2008, 02:49:18 PM
Martin, I presume you are joking about the fork-lift (?)!
Although I anticipate the all-up-weight to be between 100 and 115lb it shouldn't be too difficult to handle...the beam is the most awkward bit. The main reason I like having so much access to the interior is so I can place / remove the heavy bits (Battery clump. ballast boxes and so on while the boat is in the water...thereby leaving me with only about 30lb or so to actually heave about. The "Baroda" is 87lb auw, and "Gold Ranger" is around the 115lb mark and I have no bother with them.
The only downside I can find with a model at this scale (and I should really have remembered this from building "Bluebird" at 1:12 scale) is the amount of small detail that has to be included that can generally be left off at 1:48 or 1:96. What comes to mind is probably having to make hundreds of little "rings" in the deck planking to simulate the bolt covers. I think I shall just sharpen up the end of a brass tube and just lightly tap the marks in. Doing all the rivets on the superstructure is going to be another long and boring job. I intend using small round-head brass pins here. But that's all in the future. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on February 24, 2009, 05:19:25 PM
Just to prove that I haven't totally wasted the winter, this is how "Northumbrian" looks as of today.Take no notice of the "boot-topping" line, that will be done correctly in the fullness of time. I had a mega disaster in mid January when I took advantage of an seasonably warm day and sprayed the deck with matt laquer...only for the temp to go below freezing that night and totally ruin the finish. Stupid of me really, but there you go. 5 days with a "mouse" sander (which always gives me "white finger"), and then start again.  Ah, the joys of modelling when one is mentally breaking the wind in a breeze. Another snag I've found is that for someone of my limited stature (5'7") is that I cannot reach around the hull to turn it upside down. As one of my neighbours makes prosthetic limbs I've been wondering if he would knock me up a couple of arm extensions.
I struggled for weeks trying to devise and build a foolproof ramp operating system, but in the end decided life is too short. So at least for now the ramps will be fixed (shut, obviously!) but as the structure is removable I may change my mind. The ramp pillars are hollow, timber framed and covered with plasticard, then fastened with ally angles to a perspex base, which is then screwed into the underside of the overhanging deck. The entire unit has to be removeable so I can fit the actual ramps. So I hope all is not lost.
The little white squares are computer reduced versions of the real ones...quite readable.
Pic 2394 is not far off the model size, but the notice is just out of the depth of field area. I think the other pics are self explanatory, but there is a long way to go yet. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: chipchase on February 24, 2009, 07:42:41 PM
Looking good bryan, how much are you going to charge for trips around the lake 8)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Edward Pinniger on February 25, 2009, 01:09:08 PM
Very nice work! The deck planking (previous update) looks particularly good, it has a very convincing weathered look to it. Not a subject you often see in R/C model form, it has lots of character and should look great on the water when finished. Will you be adding a deck cargo of 1/24 model cars (as in the photo Bryan Young posted)?
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on February 25, 2009, 04:43:02 PM
Thanks for the comments. Yes, I will be "loading it up" with some vehicles from the 60s and early 70s. And loads of foot passengers. So far I have a 1960s VW Camper van, a VW Beetle, Morris Minor van (and a convertible), an early Triumph Bonneville m/c and a couple of others that I can't remember (the penalties of ageing). The idea is to "ring the changes" but the problem is how to prevent them being nicked! BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on February 25, 2009, 05:02:46 PM
Looks like she will be a fine model Bryan. I remember going across in my very first car, a Sunbeam Rapier Coupe'. From the years before that, I think anyone that crossed the Tyne can remember winter time standing outside the engine room to get the warm draught along with that special, special smell !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on February 25, 2009, 07:34:46 PM
Funny that one. Mine was a Rapier (YAJ 904), Blue and white and went like the wind (for those days). Happy days. Can you imagine the traffic nowadays trying to get on to the ferry? BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on February 26, 2009, 11:06:08 AM
Well that's a coincidence - mine was the same colour (maybe that was the only colour ?) It had a windback sunroof providing endless fun for my pals to play variations on tank commanders ! No seat belts then  %) You must have a good memory (or filing system) my registration number has long since moved to the dead bit of my brain  :embarrassed:

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on March 14, 2009, 03:52:49 PM
Just a quick update on the superstructure progress. Got a bit fed up with the ramps etc. so went off in a different direction for awhile. The next posting will hopefully show how intend to maintain access to the interior. The curved bulkheads at the back are quadrants of 5" dia. "plastic" drainpipe. Rotten stuff to glue anything to but 24hr. Araldite seems to have done the job. But even if it is a "weak point" it will all be locked together eventually.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 18, 2009, 07:36:20 PM
I've been wanting to do an update for ages now, but the foggy, damp and generally miserable weather on the NE coast hasn't been all that good for getting the beast outside to photograph. So I bit the bullet and took these with flash inside the "shed". Not the best, but hopefully will give an idea on how it's going. All the exterior painted surfaces are 20 or 40 though plasticard pre-painted and affixed to 1.5mm or 0.75mm ply (as appropriate) with my favourite double sided tape. I KNOW I keep banging on about this stuff, and am still totally bemused why so many modellers turn their noses up at its use. Even got brian_c using it now and again!
Before anyone asks, the window frames are just simple 1/8" plasticard strips carefully fitted so they are flush on the inside and project a little bit on the outside. The inner frames are 40 thou square sections fitted the same way. Getting everything to be a neat sliding fit was a long job....but I think that is what modelling is all bout anyway, so no complaints.
Pic 2418 is just a general view of the superstructure lay-out. The aft section lid (top deck) will lift off to give access to the main lifting handle for removing the big deck. The rest of the superstructure will lift off with the main-deck.
Pic 2420
The aft section is now araldited in place. The "slots" are to locate the removeable upper aft deck.
2420a
Just showing my way of fixing the large curved forward bulkhead. When fitting the angle brackets I clamped the vertical parts to the bulkhead, so when the screws are loosened the brackets move back a little so freeing the bulkhead for removal and further work.
2423.
A view along the main deck. The bit on top is the removable part. I think I'm going to have to put some lighting under the deckhead otherwise it will be in permanent semi-darkness.
2425.
The removeable deck from above. Just started planking the deck. As this deck was used only by people and not vehicles there were no oil stains and so on, but the planking was weathered and old.to get the "grey" shade of weathered wood I used Obeche (the main deck is Spruce), sprayed two 4" x 36" planks with a fairly light coat of matt black and then sanded most of the paint off, leaving a sort of blotchy grey. Then cut the whole thig up into 3/16" planks, mixed them up a bit to avoid repitition and got ready to glue them down. The "caulking" is, as usual, black insulating tape. The 4 "squares" are where the main cowl vents will sit (all guide holes are already drilled and visible from undeneath, so no need for more marking out). The big hole is to take the Engine Room skylight, and the 2 smaller ones will be for gratings. The 50p shaped thing is where the funnel goes.
2430.
This just shows the size and style of the stanchions. Obviously this is just a "mock-up" . You can get away with all the rails being the same diameter at 1:48 scale, but at 1:24 the larger dia. top rail has to be shown. Jim Lane re-jigged and made me the 70 that I need.
On the "recommendation" of another Mayhemmer I bought the Proxxon torch. I'd been humming and haahing about it for awhile but it really is a nice bit of kit and worth the £37 price. Unfortunately the little "Instruction Book" is printed in script about the size of the small print on the back of a credit card. So I couldn't read it without scanning and re-printing. As I have been diagnosed with the "dry" version of ARMD (Age Related Macular Degeneration) for which there is no cure perhaps I will be the 1st "one eyed" modeller on the Forum. Not nice. Makes modellig very slow and drillilling little hole very difficult. But just have to accept it.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: craftysod on April 18, 2009, 08:32:45 PM
Nice work,looking good
Mark
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: sentry on April 19, 2009, 01:38:01 AM
Hello Bryan.
May I ask how differant is from the Jarrow ferry, coz as a lad i saw it most days.
                                             Regards, Sentry
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 20, 2009, 06:41:16 PM
Hello Bryan.
May I ask how differant is from the Jarrow ferry, coz as a lad i saw it most days.
                                             Regards, Sentry
A bit difficult to answer that one,Sentry. But I think that the larger and newer ferries ("Tynemouth" and "Northumbrian") were kept on the N.Shields - S.Shields trot and the older (replaced) boats were shunted off onto the "minor" routes. Have a little browse through the "Old Tyne Ferries" website and some odd-ball boats will appear. Until I started building "Northumbrian" I didn't even know that there had been a Jarrow Ferry! And to be really honest, I still don't 100% know if I'm building "Northumbrian" or "Tynemouth"! The "lounge" windows on "Tynemouth" were smaller, but the funnels seem to be interchangeable depending on what set of plans and photos one is looking at. But work proceeds...slowly. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on May 13, 2009, 07:20:10 PM
I've done lots of work since the last posting, but much of it is not really evident. The upper passenger deck planking seemed never ending. Although the main (vehicle) deck is of spruce and coloured a rather nasty shade of something unmentionable, the upper deck is Obeche. The reason for this is that while the vehicle deck got all the muck and oil worked into it, the upper deck was foot passengers only, but it was well weathered. I lightly sprayed 2 planks (3ft x 4") with matt black in an uneven pattern then rubbed it all down to a lightish shade of grey. Then cut it all up into 3/16" planks and laid them just as my hand fell to get a random effect. Looks better than the pics would indicate.
The E/Rm skylights are still under construction. The octagonal thing is where the funnel will go ( 4" dia x 7.5" tall). The "lounge" seats are under way and being fitted.
Both of the upper decks will be removable seperately. The bit with the funnel on will be quite "loose" as it has to come off to give me access to the main deck lifting handles...the front part over the lounge will be "fixed" but removable.
The stanchions are of brass, but the rails are aluminium tubing (the top rail being a bit larger in dia than the others. Still a long way to go, so I'll keep plodding along. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 05, 2009, 07:56:48 PM
As I'm still pondering the best way to make cowl vents at 2" dia with a 3/4" shaft, for some light relief I've gon the "easy" route and decided to build the 16 or so seats that ringed the upper deck. These "seats" were in fact steel boxes fitted on top of each other and were the equivelant of "lifeboats". Most of them were 10' long. (5" at this scale).
I first tried building a framework skeleton but although it worked it was very laborious and the idea of making 16 of the blessed things was just too much. Life is too short! But, as everyone of advancing age knows too well, being awake at 4am with nothing to do but lie there and ponder; I hit on a solution. Many of you will have had double-glazing fitted...and years ago I kept the high density foam bars (about 5" x 2") that the units were transported in. A "Eureka" moment. Then went back to sleep.
This foam cuts pretty well in the bandsaw, so a few hours cutting the stuff up into seat sized blocks was as enjoyable as building a model gets. Of course the final shape is not just a rectangular box. Shaping is needed. But thats the next one. Nice to be making some progress. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 12, 2009, 08:15:15 PM
Plodding along with the "Bandstand" sort of wheelhouse. Everything yo can see on these pics is "loose" and can be re-alighned.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: nhp651 on June 12, 2009, 09:35:31 PM
it's a lovely and very unusual model bryan.
i enjoy your progress immensley. :-))
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on June 12, 2009, 09:43:54 PM
Hi Bryan,

Loving this build a really interesting boat to model- although I can imagine teduim breaking you down on that planking on a deck that size- I thought I was fairly patient but I think you get the medal mate!

Just need those D10's you mentioned at the beginning......... :}

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 12, 2009, 10:55:30 PM
Hi Bryan,

Loving this build a really interesting boat to model- although I can imagine teduim breaking you down on that planking on a deck that size- I thought I was fairly patient but I think you get the medal mate!

Just need those D10's you mentioned at the beginning......... :}

Greg
Sorry Greg. Thanks for your comments, but what on earth is a D10? I must be missing something or other!. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Proteus on June 13, 2009, 05:29:47 AM
Hi Bryan,

Loving this build a really interesting boat to model- although I can imagine teduim breaking you down on that planking on a deck that size- I thought I was fairly patient but I think you get the medal mate!

Just need those D10's you mentioned at the beginning......... :}

Greg
Sorry Greg. Thanks for your comments, but what on earth is a D10? I must be missing something or other!. Bryan.

Double Tens steam plants


Proteus
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: nhp651 on June 13, 2009, 08:05:20 AM
Stuart Turner Double Ten twin cylinder steam engines to be  precise...........they'd be abble to tow you behind, water skiing if you fitted them, they're so powerful in a model your size.
Lovely engines but need a lot of steam to run.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Proteus on June 13, 2009, 08:25:18 AM
Stuart Turner Double Ten twin cylinder steam engines to be  precise...........they'd be abble to tow you behind, water skiing if you fitted them, they're so powerful in a model your size.
Lovely engines but need a lot of steam to run.

I was just repeating what Brian had put in his first post , it must be hard work being perfect
all the time
Proteus
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on June 13, 2009, 09:45:36 AM
Hi Bryan,

Sorry, I should have been more specific.

I assumed you knew as you said in your very first post "My then "partner" wanted the pair of them to be built at 1:24 (0.5" /ft) as he wished to have a couple of "Double Tens" installed, whereas I was going the electric route."

Never mind- heres what a D10 looks like anyway.

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: madrob on June 13, 2009, 11:38:54 AM
This is got to be one of the oddest looking ships ive ever seen, superb build tho Bryan.
looking forward to the rest
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 13, 2009, 06:35:32 PM
Hi Bryan,

Sorry, I should have been more specific.

I assumed you knew as you said in your very first post "My then "partner" wanted the pair of them to be built at 1:24 (0.5" /ft) as he wished to have a couple of "Double Tens" installed, whereas I was going the electric route."

Never mind- heres what a D10 looks like anyway.

Greg
Sorry! I would prefer to forget some of the past history of this model and concentrate on the present. This version will be all electric. Partly because I know nowt about "steam", b, life is too short to spend another lifetime making a steam Engine Room, c, Steam is far too expensive and time consuming. d, I can't find any 3" tall engineers to run the thing. So electric it is! Cheers. B.Y.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 13, 2009, 07:01:50 PM
This is got to be one of the oddest looking ships ive ever seen, superb build tho Bryan.
looking forward to the rest
Thank you! But the boats were not really very odd. Dirty and always in need of som non-existent TLC. Untill the Tyne Tunnel opened the ferry was the quickest way to get across the Tyne if you were coming from the coastal area. Two Ferries, departing every 15 minutes. The only other way across the Tyne (with a vehicle) was to drive up to Newcastle and choose which bridge suited you best.
With the volume of traffic nowadays this system would be impossible. But this all has a long history. Goes back to the 1300s or maybe earlier. Newcastle basically wanted to maintain its pre-eminent position as the Premier port on the Tyne. And so for centuries all ideas for building a bridge over the river were knocked back. Still are, to an extent. So with the growth of traffic the Tyne tunnel was grudgingly built. Killed the vehicle ferry, but it would'nt have lasted much longer anyway. They had a good innings, from the early part of the 20th century until around 1973(ish). But they should not be forgotten as they were a great symbol of their times. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: John W E on June 13, 2009, 09:07:45 PM
hi ya there

they may have been 'dirty old ferries' but by gum they were a source of great entertainment - due to the fact there were stable doors around the top of the engine room - these were sometimes open.   You could look over the top and watch the triple expansions working - doubt that would be allowed now - also, one could go up on the top deck and the engine room skylights were always open - and from there you could look down onto the engine room.....it was many a time I used to get shouted at because as we were coming into the ferry landings we used to watch the engineers operating all of the valves, reversing geat etc., the rest of my family were away making their way off the ferry landing and my brother and I were still peering over the top.

oh that smell......like standing next to a steam train engine....  :-)) :-)) happy days.

I recall one of the ferries was purchased by McNulty's on the Tyne - and then it was converted into a restaurant - moved to Gateshead - not sure where she is now....possibly good quality BMW motor.  :}

aye
john e
bluebird
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 13, 2009, 09:14:27 PM
I must be one of a very few people still around to have steered the Northumbrian ! To be truthful I was around 5 years old and the skipper was behind me with his hands on the wheel as well (No hello sailor jokes please !) My mam knew him and on a trip 'owa the watter' he invited us into the wheelhouse, I also have a mental picture of a stool with a small white enamel dish on it filled with an untouched rice pudding that was far more interesting at the time !

Know what you mean about the sights and smells of the engine room John, brings the memories flooding back !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 14, 2009, 05:30:44 PM
Just a quickie on the wheelhouse. Yesterdays pics showed all the uprights as being anything but upright. This is an interim pic of what it should look like.
Also, to my shame, I have made a serious boo-boo with my geometry. The doors were of the sliding sort..and I've made the entrance too small. Shoot...and further expletives would be deleted. So I'm going to have to make the doors in a more conventional manner. And keep them shut! A bit of a downer, but my fault.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ronkh on June 14, 2009, 09:03:54 PM
Mistakes happen don't they?
Still a very nice model and an interesting build. Thank you for it.

Ron.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 15, 2009, 08:13:18 PM
Today. Bad news. After ordering 4 packets of the smallest "eye-bolts" that Billings produce I find that Billings have stopped producing them!  Disaster! I need 4 packets  (each of about 100) to complete the seat/liferaft items.
In days of yore, before the eyesight went a bit wonky I could make them...now I can't even buy them! Rats!. Suppose I'm going to have to dream up another solution to the problem. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on June 15, 2009, 08:29:03 PM
Are these of any use Bryan?

http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/amati_eyebolts.html

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 15, 2009, 11:02:13 PM
Are these of any use Bryan?

http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/amati_eyebolts.html

Colin
Thank you Colin. I'll measure up tomorrow, and if theyr'e the same as the ones I have an order will be placed. I need 400 of them!!! BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on June 16, 2009, 10:14:53 AM
Bryan,

I have been using the Amati part 4703 eyebolts and found them very handy. Although the external dimension is a nominal 2mm the interior dimension is near enough 1mm. At under £3 for 100 they won't entirely break the bank although I won't say the same for your eyesight!

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 16, 2009, 06:04:50 PM
Bryan,

I have been using the Amati part 4703 eyebolts and found them very handy. Although the external dimension is a nominal 2mm the interior dimension is near enough 1mm. At under £3 for 100 they won't entirely break the bank although I won't say the same for your eyesight!

Colin
Thanks a million Colin. I 'phoned Cornwall Models this morning and was "dealt with" by a very nice lady. As the items are the same size and shape as the Billings offerings but less than half the price I'm not surprised that Billings have stopped production. But then, I've always considered Billings to be way over priced anyway.Now all I have to do is fit 400 little eyebolts, reeve one at a time fitting a little tubular glass bead (to be painted black) and continue (off and on) for the next half century!. Thanks again. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: nemesis on June 16, 2009, 06:42:53 PM
BY, Squires may have what you require, nice to see the funnel,
                                   Nemesis
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on June 16, 2009, 07:01:19 PM
Glad to be of assistance Bryan. I find they come in useful for all sorts of things including rigging attachments.

Nemesis, yes Squires do sell them which is where I got mine but I think Cornwall Models are a bit cheaper.

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 16, 2009, 08:28:12 PM
BY, Squires may have what you require, nice to see the funnel,
                                   Nemesis
Yeah, the funnel looks about right, but I'm now having second thoughts about the material. Perhaps not too hapy with aluminium. Perhaps "plastic" would be a better choice. One lives and learns.. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 17, 2009, 08:39:10 AM
BY, Squires may have what you require, nice to see the funnel,
                                   Nemesis
Yeah, the funnel looks about right, but I'm now having second thoughts about the material. Perhaps not too hapy with aluminium. Perhaps "plastic" would be a better choice. One lives and learns.. BY.

Would agree with you there Bryan, if the photo is giving the true impression it looks a bit too smooth and perfect, but hey I should be able to build that good  O0

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 17, 2009, 05:49:17 PM
Mike, re the funnel. I got the aluminium tube accurately chopped and when I plonked it into position I found that it being a big and shiny lump, I had no visual reference as to how it would actually look. So 5 minutes with an aerosol gave what you see in the pics. There is a shed load of attachments to put on the thing, and drilling so many small holes through the ally might prove counter-productive.
There is an "inner" funnel to make and fit. So my present thinking is to make the outer one out of "plastic", and the much smaller inner one out of ally....there's also the "top-hat" to make, with any luck my geometry may hold up for that bit!. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 17, 2009, 06:05:11 PM
You are right Bryan, it is probably just seeing the funnel as a plain yellow and black tube without all the extras - top hat, whistle, ladders, stays etc etc to draw the eye away from the expanse to the detail. Just me jumping to the end before the job is finished - engaging mouth before brain or whatever ! O0

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 17, 2009, 08:16:31 PM
You are right Bryan, it is probably just seeing the funnel as a plain yellow and black tube without all the extras - top hat, whistle, ladders, stays etc etc to draw the eye away from the expanse to the detail. Just me jumping to the end before the job is finished - engaging mouth before brain or whatever ! O0

Mike
Don't fret about it! Your comments and observation are always welcome. As always, making a model of a ship/boat about which there is sparse information is a bit difficult. OK, I know I have "builders" plans. But they are of 1930. The vessel changed over the years and I would really like to build it the way I remembered it during the long dark days (and nights) trogging my weary way to South Shields Marine College (as it was then).
It's just a pity that we all took the "thing" for granted. I guess we all had other things on our minds. Real serious stuff like "Where are we going for a pint tonight?" or "What on earth is this "Deviation Board" all about?" ( Nothing, I hasten to add, that SSMTC had anything whatsoever to do with the present alliteration of "deviation"....this one is about magnetism and compasses!). I'm still enjoying the build,sort of...but the end result may be OK..Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 18, 2009, 08:08:23 AM
Now you've spoilt my day, dragging up memories of that evil surf board, coefficient B etc etc and the pleasant hours spent up at the Newcastle exam centre. I'm off to do some 'swinging' with an Asda trolley - much more mind numbing.  ;)

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 18, 2009, 07:41:11 PM
Now you've spoilt my day, dragging up memories of that evil surf board, coefficient B etc etc and the pleasant hours spent up at the Newcastle exam centre. I'm off to do some 'swinging' with an Asda trolley - much more mind numbing.  ;)

Mike
I'm sure I didn't spoil your day. Perhaps brought back some long lost memories of thinking how pointless the whole thing was, as no-one ever touched the compass no matter where you were or what hemisphere you were in. Exam boards were (in those days) stuck in the 1920s when most of the examiners were last at sea.
Remember the "Board of Trade" ration scale for seafarers? "One Egg Per Day Perhaps" sort of thing. "Seven-bell" fritters? "Field Days"? God, I loved them! (!!!!). Cooks who couldn't cook. I could go on forever but Bunkerbarge might take offence. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 18, 2009, 07:50:05 PM
Todays little offering is just about the development of the wheelhouse. An enjoyable if at times a bit frustrating thing to make.
There is still a long way to go ....but that's what modelling is about. The stbd door is sort of fitted but lacks "furniture" at the moment.
But here's where I am as of today.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ZZ56 on June 18, 2009, 10:05:25 PM
Looks superb, Brian!  No doubt she'll be a steady sailer.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 18, 2009, 10:52:03 PM
ZZ:- not altogether sure about the "steady" sailing. If you look at some of the early pics of the build you'll notice that the actual hull is about 4" less in beam than that over the deck. This may cause a few problems. Cheers. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 19, 2009, 05:39:08 AM
Looking great (including the funnel  %) ) Don't forget the cracket with the rice pudding on top, it was tucked into that space to stbd of the console fwd. !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 19, 2009, 05:41:44 PM
Looking great (including the funnel  %) ) Don't forget the cracket with the rice pudding on top, it was tucked into that space to stbd of the console fwd. !

Mike
I suppose the rice pudding would be easy enough, as would the cracket. Perusing the original plans (1930), I can see that there is (was) space on the port side, but since the radar was fitted that space is not available. However....just for you....I'll put it beside the steering gear box cover at the back end. Send me a model of a 5 or 6 year old at 1:24 painted in the old school uniform and I'll put you in it. (seriously). BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: mackem1946 on June 20, 2009, 03:02:22 PM
Great stuff , Bryan, these ferries were an integral part of my life as a young kid. I lived in the Garricks head pub in Soo Shields and uesd to go to my aunts house in Monkseaton every weekend . and can still smell the oily engineroom. Many a run down the pontoon , when I was older to catch the last ferry, across ,after being to W,Bay Ice Rink. then becoming older , rolling out of the "Jungle" onto the ferry across to the "Cellar Club" in Shields.All this couldn't have happened without the great old ferries.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 21, 2009, 09:19:44 AM
Looking great (including the funnel  %) ) Don't forget the cracket with the rice pudding on top, it was tucked into that space to stbd of the console fwd. !

Mike
I suppose the rice pudding would be easy enough, as would the cracket. Perusing the original plans (1930), I can see that there is (was) space on the port side, but since the radar was fitted that space is not available. However....just for you....I'll put it beside the steering gear box cover at the back end. Send me a model of a 5 or 6 year old at 1:24 painted in the old school uniform and I'll put you in it. (seriously). BY.

That would be an honour Bryan, but I doubt if I could find a good looking enough model at that scale  :} also in this sad Big Brother age we are in I would probably be had up for wanting to buy a model of a 5 year old boy. !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 21, 2009, 08:51:17 PM
Looking great (including the funnel  %) ) Don't forget the cracket with the rice pudding on top, it was tucked into that space to stbd of the console fwd. !

Mike
I suppose the rice pudding would be easy enough, as would the cracket. Perusing the original plans (1930), I can see that there is (was) space on the port side, but since the radar was fitted that space is not available. However....just for you....I'll put it beside the steering gear box cover at the back end. Send me a model of a 5 or 6 year old at 1:24 painted in the old school uniform and I'll put you in it. (seriously). BY.

That would be an honour Bryan, but I doubt if I could find a good looking enough model at that scale  :} also in this sad Big Brother age we are in I would probably be had up for wanting to buy a model of a 5 year old boy. !

Mike
Shame on you!  So I'll have to do it myself then. So much for "commitment". Disappointingly yours., BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 22, 2009, 07:48:02 AM
Not fair !! Now you have made me feel all guilty and I haven't done anything !
I'm sure you would do a better job than my artistic talents would produce. No school uniform by the way - only posh schools in South Shields dressed their pupils in pretty uniforms - it made it easier for us tykes to pick out targets ! Mortimer Road Infants only required kids to be scrubbed up and 'decent' on arrival, what state you were in at home time was another matter !
Shamedly yours,  Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 23, 2009, 08:08:34 PM
A couple of little problems have arisen since the last post.
1.  Searching through my pretty large pic library, and having used them often enough, I cannot find a decent pic of the faces of an Engine Room Telegraph. I guess familiarity does breed contempt. I have pics of very old ones, and quite new ones...but none of the "traditional" sort.....especially for a twin screw ship.
2..I-ve made the "structure" of the telegraph, but I'm blowed if I can work out a way of making the control handles. (apologies to our US readers...some things get lost in translation). As the model is 1:24 scale and the telegraph itself (minus handles) is 2" tall (actually, a bit less), I wonder if anyone has any ideas? BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ZZ56 on June 23, 2009, 10:57:00 PM
Bryan,

What about cutting this shape from thin shim brass and attaching a piece of rod for a handle, then bending it to fit over the round part of the telegraph?  The curvature should make both the 'legs' touch.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/DestructorBot/telegraph.jpg)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 24, 2009, 06:18:16 PM
Bryan,

What about cutting this shape from thin shim brass and attaching a piece of rod for a handle, then bending it to fit over the round part of the telegraph?  The curvature should make both the 'legs' touch.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v323/DestructorBot/telegraph.jpg)

ZZ, thanks for the idea....I'll mull over it for awhile. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 24, 2009, 07:36:11 PM
Still plodding along with the wheelhouse. Nearly 3 weeks now. Started the glazing but am having a bit of difficulty putting the glue where I want it to go. The main body of the telegraph has been turned up in 2 bits (obviously). The compass was 3 layers of close fitting brass tubing stuck together with 24hr Araldite with a centre core of teak. I didn't want to use solder as I might well finish up with silvery "streaks" on the thing. Then it was all carefully turned down to get the profile. The compass rose is simply a scanned pic of one and reduced to size on the printer. The radar is a vague copy of a 1950s Kelvin Hughes item. The cowl is simply a chopped top from an expired Loctite container. In real life I imagine that the radar Magnetron would have played havoc with the compass but I guess a compass wasn't really necessary to get from N to S.Shields. When the "roof" is on it's a bit difficult to pick out the details so I've decided to leave it more or less as it is.
Withe the exception of a cracket, a bowl of rice pudding and a (modern) copy of a Daily Mail front page! BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on June 24, 2009, 08:08:28 PM
Hi Bryan,

At risk of sounding like a southern fairy, what or who is cracket and why do they like rice pudding?!?!? :o :embarrassed: ;)

Build is looking great, I know what it's like to spend ages in one part- got so bored of planking this week I painted the hull instead- inspiration restored!

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 24, 2009, 08:56:09 PM
My fault Greg  :embarrassed: memories of a childhood treat to 'drive' the ferry ! I have just Googled 'what is a cracket' to draw a complete blank so that is an achievement in itself ! A cracket is a small stool. My interpretation is an oblong wooden structure with a flat top and side strengthening pieces and a small banana shaped hole in the middle for carrying purposes. it probably started off as something completely different in the mists of Geordie furniture ! As for the rice pudding I have a vivid mental picture of a small white, with blue enamel piping dish, with a rice pudding in it ; presumably given to the skipper as part of his bait by the missus !
The wheelhouse looks great Bryan, I like the ingenious use of the Araldite top ! I wonder when the ferries had radar fitted, sometime after my rice pudding experience, I bet !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 25, 2009, 06:14:24 PM
I was happy enough with the "bowl" of rice-pudding....but now you want a "wedgewood" version! What next? A silver spoon, or will a pair of chopsticks suffice? .....or, perhaps being the "street urchin" you say you were, maybe fingers were the "tool of the day"?. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Roger in France on June 25, 2009, 06:24:20 PM
Came up Portsmouth Harbour the other day on a ferry from France. Passed by "Fort Grange" and thought of you Bryan....and I was supposed to be on leave from Mayhem !

Roger in France
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 26, 2009, 08:24:37 AM
I was happy enough with the "bowl" of rice-pudding....but now you want a "wedgewood" version! What next? A silver spoon, or will a pair of chopsticks suffice? .....or, perhaps being the "street urchin" you say you were, maybe fingers were the "tool of the day"?. BY.

Huh ??
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 26, 2009, 05:23:33 PM
So sorry Mike, I dashed down to the ferry landing stage as quickly as I could. But you had gone. All that was left was an empty bowl and a spoon. At least (being an urchin) you did'nt pinch the stool.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 26, 2009, 05:51:04 PM
Just beautiful ! I feel very honoured - a piece of my childhood locked away for posterity  O0 Hopefully I will get a chance to see the finished model on the water one day
I don't know about pinching the stool, suffice it to say that the blame for any window broken in a 5 mile radius of our house was automatically laid at my feet ( wrongly of course !  ;))

Thank you Bryan

Mike


Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 26, 2009, 07:09:55 PM
Mike. Right. Now we've got that little lot out of the way, can I please get back to building the ruddy thing!
Spent all day drilling tiny wee holes and stuffing tiny wee eyelets into them (the holes) in the "buoyant" seats. Drilling the holes is no problem...but penetrating the hole is a bit of a hit and miss affair. But such is life. Numerous suggestions have been given to me, ranging from the use of a suitable funnel to an outer ring of a fine but curved filament. None of which really works. So I guess I'm back to using Mk.1 eyeball (note the singular). Of course, I'm still avidly awaiting the arrival of the small boy for his second helping. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: DickyD on June 26, 2009, 07:21:47 PM
Excellent Bryan I have been waiting to see how the cracket and bowl of rice would turn out.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: catengineman on June 26, 2009, 09:09:15 PM
Mike. Right. Now we've got that little lot out of the way, can I please get back to building the ruddy thing!
Spent all day drilling tiny wee holes and stuffing tiny wee eyelets into them (the holes) in the "buoyant" seats. Drilling the holes is no problem...but penetrating the hole is a bit of a hit and miss affair. But such is life. Numerous suggestions have been given to me, ranging from the use of a suitable funnel to an outer ring of a fine but curved filament. None of which really works. So I guess I'm back to using Mk.1 eyeball (note the singular). Of course, I'm still avidly awaiting the arrival of the small boy for his second helping. BY.

Have you though to use the little tool that dressmakers use to thread needles
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 27, 2009, 08:31:19 AM
After mini rice bowls a few eyelets should be easy ! Ok, ok only joking !!  O0

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 27, 2009, 05:07:55 PM
After mini rice bowls a few eyelets should be easy ! Ok, ok only joking !!  O0

Mike
Sitting here a bit goggle-eyed after fitting 350 of the damn things today. I thought 500 would be sufficient. Wrong. I need another 200 to finish the job. (I forgot about the 6 at each end of the 18 seats ....buggeration). This particular task is becoming something of a test of my fortitude and bloody-mindedness. And I've still got to rig the lifelines through them with "hand-grips" in each loop. Why did I ever start! I'm really at the stage of build where just about everything is a bit of a trial, now the main "structure" is just about complete. As ever, your comments (and those of others) help immensly...even if only to give me a bit of a giggle. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 28, 2009, 09:00:20 AM
As long as you are still talking to us that's the main thing ! I can't quite picture what the eyelets are representing on the rafts but no doubt we will see on the next update. Was it those ferries that had the wooden bobbin thingies on the bight of the grablines, or maybe I have seen them elsewhere  %) %%
Sorry it's a bit early and I didn't read your posting fully re the handgrips/bobbins - it was those ferries !. That will be off to the handicraft shop for suitable beads ? I made the rollers around the gaff jaws on the barge with them (parells are they called ?) They were a nice dark brown and cost very little for thousands of them !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 28, 2009, 06:37:05 PM
As long as you are still talking to us that's the main thing ! I can't quite picture what the eyelets are representing on the rafts but no doubt we will see on the next update. Was it those ferries that had the wooden bobbin thingies on the bight of the grablines, or maybe I have seen them elsewhere  %) %%
Sorry it's a bit early and I didn't read your posting fully re the handgrips/bobbins - it was those ferries !. That will be off to the handicraft shop for suitable beads ? I made the rollers around the gaff jaws on the barge with them (parells are they called ?) They were a nice dark brown and cost very little for thousands of them !

Mike
Yep. Thats them. Except that I couldn't get brown ones so mine are a sort of iridescent turquoise..they have to be painted black anyway. The 1mm eyelets do exactly the same job as they do on a ships lifeboat....hold the grablines together. Normally I don't do any modelling on a Sunday (shades of Merlina Moucouri), but I'm a bit fed up with reading all the things I never wanted to know about somebody called Jackson. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 28, 2009, 09:53:24 PM
Mike. Right. Now we've got that little lot out of the way, can I please get back to building the ruddy thing!
Spent all day drilling tiny wee holes and stuffing tiny wee eyelets into them (the holes) in the "buoyant" seats. Drilling the holes is no problem...but penetrating the hole is a bit of a hit and miss affair. But such is life. Numerous suggestions have been given to me, ranging from the use of a suitable funnel to an outer ring of a fine but curved filament. None of which really works. So I guess I'm back to using Mk.1 eyeball (note the singular). Of course, I'm still avidly awaiting the arrival of the small boy for his second helping. BY.

Have you though to use the little tool that dressmakers use to thread needles
Yes I have. But that little gizmo will only come into play when I start reeving the things. Ta for the thought. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 29, 2009, 06:00:45 PM
Mike: so sorry to read that the little grey cells have forgotten how grab-lines were (are?) fitted. Perhaps this will jog the memory. Also remember that all the visible fittings you see here are on all 4 sides and "double-layered".
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on June 29, 2009, 06:20:15 PM
Thanks Bryan, I was thinking more of lifeboat grablines, it all becomes obvious from the photo. I had a bit of a start when I saw the kid at the aft end, but then thought it couldn't have been me with that posh coat and no raggy ar--d trusers. He must have been from the North Side !  O0 ;)

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on June 29, 2009, 10:27:12 PM
The young lad is the son of the photographer. The photographer was Bill Thompson  (normally known as Cap'n Bill) of TMBC. Bill built a model of the Northumbrian entirely out of tin plate some 30 years ago. Without his contemporary photos I would have had a real uphill battle with "only" the builders drawings to rely on. Bills model was (is) at 1:36 scale. Bill was also quite well known for his humorous and informative articles in the late 1970s issues of Model Boats. He's still an active member of TMBC although he must be approaching his 120th birthday by now. But truly, I couldn't have built my model without his input. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on July 07, 2009, 08:21:12 PM
Time for another update for those who are interested. Seems to have been a lot of work and time for little result. Tried to grab a few "rays" between noisy "showers", but constantly forced to retreat to the workshop.
A niggle. Why can't I buy a paintbrush of quality that just fits a Humbrol tin? I'm fed up with shaving the larger ones and then not being able to reach near the bottom of the tin.
Still searching for decent quality "G"scale figures (unpainted)...but not metal ones. As I need a lorry for the deck, I think I'll buy one of the "EMHAR" Bedfords. Look good to me.
The pics:-
2488a & b show seat layout, painted and ready for rigging. One is completed. (The missing one on the stbd side is being worked on). The longer seats are 7" long and have 68 of those little eyebolts each. Never again.
2489a
Pillars fitted (removeable if required). Handrails around stairs done. Not happy with the top one on the port side, but it was well and truly fixed when I noticed the "droop". Happens to all of us I suppose, at one time or another.
Funnel bands fitted. 2 layers of overlapping "strip" topped with half-round section. The for'd rails have yet to be extended to the wheelhouse
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on July 08, 2009, 07:35:45 AM
Now I understand the eyelet 'trials' even more ! She's looking beautiful if that's the right word for a hard working old lady, every picture evokes a quick flash of memory of some trip over the river.
One thing, just how are you going to manhandle this large girthed lady into the lake ? It looks a bit much for one person ?

regards

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on July 08, 2009, 05:32:23 PM
Thanks again Mike. Heaving it around is not a big problem although a bit of a clart. Lift the funnel and the back end of the passenger deck lifts off. Inside the "engine room" area is a fixed handle. Lift that and the whole upper deck lifts off. Leaving an empty hull. 2 spring loaded handles fitted to bulkheads enables the hull to be transported to wherever (the water I hope....if the council have cleared the weed before it's ready for launch). Once in the water the ballast can be put in, deck replaced and the funnel deck plonked back on. And away we go. The bare hull with motors is only about 15-20 lbs. However, I'm debating (with myself) the feasability of building a launching trolley. I guess launching from a trolley wouldn't be too difficult, but recovery may take some practise! Made the funnel "top hat" today from aluminium. Nice sharp edges to catch poking fingers! Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on July 09, 2009, 08:33:21 AM
Well you certainly thought ahead (must try it myself sometime !) Following the 'to the lake procedure' conjured up that ad on the tv for the car that transforms to a robot and then back again  :} Has the Tynemouth lake got sloping sides ? I cannot remember, if it has then a trolley may be preferable to a dunking if the sides are slimy  O0
Looking forward to the next update

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on July 19, 2009, 07:57:22 PM
Willing to chance another poetic epistle from "Bluebird"...
Pic 2410a just shows how it's coming together.
2498a is the "Fire Engine" as it was called in 1930 (and wasn't ever updated as far as I know. From the looks of it I would think it was a steam device. Could be wrong. I would have thought that water / foam would have been better, but who knows.
2508a ..the stbd. seats are more or less done.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on July 20, 2009, 08:10:24 AM
Looks better and better, Bryan. When she's finished I bet the Shields Gazette/Cookson Country (and the local Northside evening paper ?) would be interested in taking some pictures for publication, there's a lot of Tynesiders still around with very fond memories of those ferries.

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on July 20, 2009, 02:33:18 PM
Just wonderful Bryan- having never seen these boats your model leave nothing to the imagination- can just see the pall of smoke puthering from the funnel on a drizzly day on the Tyne as the Morris minors, Minis, Austins, ERFs etc roll on and off.

Do you weather your models artificially or will you leave the weather to do it for real?

Greg

PS thanks for the explanation of a cracket mike.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on July 20, 2009, 03:07:36 PM
You are welcome Greg, I never realized it was so little known until on here.

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on July 20, 2009, 05:21:31 PM
Just wonderful Bryan- having never seen these boats your model leave nothing to the imagination- can just see the pall of smoke puthering from the funnel on a drizzly day on the Tyne as the Morris minors, Minis, Austins, ERFs etc roll on and off.

Do you weather your models artificially or will you leave the weather to do it for real?

Greg

PS thanks for the explanation of a cracket mike.
Talking about the boat or the vehicles? For the boats I usually just brush the dust off. Dirtying up the vehicles will be a new thing for me, and as yet I haven't decided how to go about it. But plenty of time to think about that. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: sentry on July 20, 2009, 10:14:46 PM
Me for one brings a tear to my eye just thinking of them lovely days when the Tyne was a river and not just a nice walk as it is now Jimmy Nail got it stop on with the song BIG RIVER , been in Lincolnshire now for 32 years but still and always will be proud  to say am a Geordie even if I married a mackem and love Sunderland football club will always remember my days as a boy on the river side watching the ferry's Sentry.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 05, 2009, 09:30:16 PM
Just a couple of pics to show that the old girl is still progressing. The pic of the telegraph is larger than "life size"...it is 2" tall.
This model is proving difficult to photograph as one detail needs to be seen in conjunction with others that cannot be fitted into the 161kb limit imposed without going all blurry. Making the telegraphs was interesting if time consuming....as was the radar mast and scanner. The seats continue to be a pain in the tripes, but only 8 to go.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on August 05, 2009, 10:21:43 PM
Hi Bryan,

Talking about the boat or the vehicles? For the boats I usually just brush the dust off. Dirtying up the vehicles will be a new thing for me, and as yet I haven't decided how to go about it. But plenty of time to think about that. Bryan.

I meant the model as a whole- vehicles and all?

A little question you may be able to answer- I see your good looking little whistle has it's pull chord running down into the decks- did it have remote operation from the wheelhouse or did the engineroom(?) operate it? Just about every other steamboat of this size just has it running to the wheelhouse dangling between the funnel and the helm.

Greg


(edit) I just realised that it wasn't the whistle pull chord I waas looking at, it was one of the funnel cables! Need glasses!!
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ZZ56 on August 05, 2009, 11:07:25 PM
Looking beautiful, Bryan.  The seats are tiny models unto themselves. 
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on August 06, 2009, 08:26:08 AM


A little question you may be able to answer- I see your good looking little whistle has it's pull chord running down into the decks- did it have remote operation from the wheelhouse or did the engineroom(?) operate it? Just about every other steamboat of this size just has it running to the wheelhouse dangling between the funnel and the helm.

Greg


(edit) I just realised that it wasn't the whistle pull chord I waas looking at, it was one of the funnel cables! Need glasses!!

I seem to remember that the connection to the whistle was nothing more technical than a length of seizing wire or maybe a little heavier gauge (usually 2 port and stbd ?) with a grab handle on the end. When arriving in port after a long sea passage we used to give the whistle a blow to clear accumulated water from the pipes. Apart from the comical noises as it cleared its throat, anybody passing below got a soaking as it spouted hot water everywhere !

Mike

PS She's looking better and better Bryan, if that's possible  O0
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 06, 2009, 05:53:00 PM
Hi Bryan,

I meant the model as a whole- vehicles and all?

A little question you may be able to answer- I see your good looking little whistle has it's pull chord running down into the decks- did it have remote operation from the wheelhouse or did the engineroom(?) operate it? Just about every other steamboat of this size just has it running to the wheelhouse dangling between the funnel and the helm.

Greg


(edit) I just realised that it wasn't the whistle pull chord I waas looking at, it was one of the funnel cables! Need glasses!!
The whistle is indeed operated from the wheelhouse via a wire sagging (or dangling) between the 2. But as the deck area holding the funnel lifts off for access it seems pointless to fit it....suppose I could still fit the operating arm though. Another required departure from the "real" is that for the reasons given re access, the 2 forward funnel guys have had to be moved aft a bit. Looks a bit odd I suppose, but when needs must and all that.... BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 12, 2009, 06:31:41 PM
At long last I've finished the seats. It wasn't that they were difficult.....it was just the sheer repitition of it all. 1000 eyelets and roughly half that number of "hand grip" beads. I found myself wondering if this job would outlive my short spell on this mortal coil.
The next "big job" is the making of the cowl ventilators. For previous models I have been able to make "plugs" with a diameter of cowl of just over 1", set in the vertical column, and vac form them in my home-made (and very basic) vac-forming machine. But the 4 vents fitted to the ferry have a cowl dia of 2". Beyond the scope of my machinery. Also, being at 1:24 scale the detail and accuracy has to be a bit more precise than when making these things at 1:48. I've been trying for weeks now to find a local wood turner, but I guess that as it is a "hobby" a bit like model boat building these folk are hard to find. Tried "Craft Fairs" and all that. But I think I have found someone not too far away from me. Fingers crossed and I'll keep you informed. When they (the vents) are done and dusted that will be the end of the major constructional work. Then I'll continue the search for "people" and suitable vehicles. This thing is costing me an arm and both legs now...and I still haven't bought the 2 ESCs and the receiver!
It wasn't worth putting any new pics on here until I have something "different" to show. Cheers. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on August 13, 2009, 07:45:14 AM
It will be a bit of an anti climax handling the big stuff after all that bead work I suppose  %) %) I found Revell did a 1/24 truck crew consisting of two blokes and a little girl for some reason that weren't too expensive. They are all in the seated position obviously, but if they are still available, they could put a couple of bottoms on those lovely seats !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 13, 2009, 06:05:08 PM
It will be a bit of an anti climax handling the big stuff after all that bead work I suppose  %) %) I found Revell did a 1/24 truck crew consisting of two blokes and a little girl for some reason that weren't too expensive. They are all in the seated position obviously, but if they are still available, they could put a couple of bottoms on those lovely seats !

Mike
Mike, I don't know so much about going from little to "big"...see attached pic of the vents. Although the main trunks will be just over 1" dia there is still the turning gear to work out.
I've looked at the Revell site and (after a hint from Dicky D) quite like the look of some of their "older" models. As far as figures are concerned I was thinking in terms of 50 or so of the little swines.
Radically changing the topic, I think you are on a hiding to nothing as far as your petition is concerned. One of my (widowed) neighbours has been a member (can't think of another word) for many years and she reckons it's all done and dusted. Many reasons for closure. Lack of support. Not enough seamen visitors to make it worthwhile. Poor and uninterested leadership. And on it goes. Sorry.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on August 13, 2009, 07:54:49 PM
Thanks for the info Bryan, truth be known I was a bit pessimistic anyway but I thought it worth a few key strokes, I have yet to see any petition I have added my name to get anywhere especially if the government is involved (or accountants !)
Glad to here DickyD has come up with the 1/24th figure solution as 50 sets of two blokes and a girl would look a bit daft ! ( I know the arithmetic doesn't match up either !) Seeing those vents made me think of you and your watchmate fighting to turn similar sized handraulic beasts off the wind in the middle of the night when a tropical squall hit, when men were men blah, blah  %%

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 14, 2009, 05:31:20 PM
Some of you may well have either seen my "Baroda" at shows or as photos on this forum. So I show this pic as a comparison.
When I first started this build I knew it was going to be wide, although only 51" long. But, like Topsy it has just growed and growed...and the rubber tyre fenders have still to be fitted, adding yet anothe 1" or so to the beam. Sometimes I wish I'd never started it in the first place! I'm still enjoying the build (sort of) but it has become a bit of an effort turning it around without dismantling it and using the inside hull lifting handles.  I really must put my few remaining little grey cells to work and dream up a lifting arrangement for launching and recovery from the water. If the blessed thing had a "normal" hull then there wouldn't be a problem. But the 2" (on each side) deck extention makes things a bit awkward.
By the way, the trailer in which the ferry is pictured is 4' wide.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: sentry on August 14, 2009, 09:57:08 PM
Brian I only wish i,ed had the chance to build it my self so many memories keep up the great work.
                                                            Sentry.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 16, 2009, 06:31:53 PM
Took it down to the lake this morning just to show how the thing is progressing....and listen to comments. At least 3 guys mentioned that they thought the funnel clour was too dark (not the black bit). I know that memories fade a bit and the boat went out of service at least 35 years ago. So now I feel a bit stumped. An unexpected deviation. But I have found a wood-turner who may be able to help with turning the plug ventilator cowls. So not all bad news. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on August 17, 2009, 08:18:52 AM
Now you come to mention it I can see a lighter slightly washed out yellow in my minds eye, but that may be auto suggestion. I'll agree to anything !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 25, 2009, 06:56:28 PM
OK, I know these aren't the greatest pics the world has seen, but they are just "record" shots. Once I'm fully mobile again I'll get some better outdoor pics. The making and fitting of the ramps has been a problem for months now, but as with bulls and horns, a start had to be made sometime.
The last major "above decks" job is the making of the 4 large cowl vents. But just in case they get delayed I spent next Xmas money today on 2 ESCs and a reciever. So I can get on with that....and then probably a "steam whistle" module from FLJ.
2546...Inside of stbd ramp withe sliding foot, ramp control and mesh rope guard.
2548...A very poor general shot.
2549...Port ramp from aft.
2550...Outboard of stbd. ramp.
2551...Port ramp from aft.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on August 25, 2009, 07:14:07 PM
Hi Bryan,

Still improving!!!! :o

Great to see how authentic tghis model looks- you should be proud.

Regarding a whistle sound module- why not put one of those cheap 12V car accessory-socket powered tyre compressors pumping onto a small reservoir then fit a model steam whistle on the funnel with a servo-controlled valve (look at http://www.mainsteam.co.uk/products/whistle.htm (http://www.mainsteam.co.uk/products/whistle.htm))?

Just a sugestion... :-))

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 29, 2009, 05:49:12 PM
Hi Bryan,

Still improving!!!! :o

Great to see how authentic tghis model looks- you should be proud.

Regarding a whistle sound module- why not put one of those cheap 12V car accessory-socket powered tyre compressors pumping onto a small reservoir then fit a model steam whistle on the funnel with a servo-controlled valve (look at http://www.mainsteam.co.uk/products/whistle.htm (http://www.mainsteam.co.uk/products/whistle.htm))?

Just a sugestion... :-))

Greg
Greg. Thanks for the interesting reply. Although I have oodles of space to fit your suggested idea, I must decline! For a start, my "steam pipes" are solid (knitting needles) and I have no desire to make them again out of tubing. Then fastening the whistle body to whatever a whistle is fastened to sounds like too much hard work with the always present chance that the thing may blow off its mounts and become an unguided missile. Finally, I really want a nice deep toned steam whistle sound and not the shriek that was given off by steam trains. I think I'll stick with the electronic version. Ta for the interest though. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 29, 2009, 06:28:15 PM
Some while ago (when building "General Havelock") I posted a rather uninformative pic of cowl vent making. T that time I already had the "plugs" made (for another model) so this time around I thought I'd do a series from conception to completion. The next 4 pics show how I make a vent plug (or mould or whatever you wish to call it) from its raw beginnings to being ready for vac-forming. I'll cover the rest when the basic forms are done. Making your own simple vac-forming machine is really quite easy and it can be very useful, but the cowls for the Northumbrian vents are 2" in dia and a bit over what my little machine is capable of handling. James Lane has a heavy-duty thing so he's said he will do the actual forming for me. The same plug will be used for all 4 vents.
Pic 2552,
The 2 rough plug elements, granted that they look "dual purpose", but as this is a family forum just acknowledge that they are fo making air ventilators. OK? I have 2 just in case I made a horlicks out of one of them.
2554.
Gash spiggot cut off and taped around the approx "cut off" line. Cowl end slotted and main shaft trimmed to fit.
2555.
The 2 parts glued together.
2559.
All trimmed up and the flaring contours smoothed in with car body filler. The cowl is cut off with a 5* rake. (Cowl vents very seldom have vertical faces on the cowls).
2561.
The unit sliced in half. "Filler" pieces to both halves to give a clean line after vac-forming.
This is the last major job to do on the upperworks. Electronics and ballasting next. Should be interesting. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on August 29, 2009, 06:35:38 PM
Oops. More finger trouble! Can the "powers that be" please delete one of the duplicates?
2552.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 04, 2009, 07:36:58 PM
I've been plodding along with these vents for quite long enough now.
The enclosed pic shows the "state of play" as of 10 minutes ago.
The "orange" sort of colour comes from having my reading lamp too close to the subject. Sorry.
The vents are 6" tall. The main "turning" gear is made from a suitably sized "tie-wrap" that looks about right.
Still to be done are the 4 little guide/holding down wheels that run around the lower (square) ring.
The main drive wheel and the rod is yet to be made and fitted. But nearly there!
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: mackem1946 on September 05, 2009, 12:24:12 PM
    :-))   Superb Work Brian, you must have the constitution of a horse to keep going.
On the subject of "Crackets" they originated in the coal mines and were used by the Hewers to sit on when they were working in coal seams which had a lot of water flowing through them.  They had very short legs just enough to keer the man's bum out of the water. The hole in the top was a different shape in different areas and was used to pick them up. Where I came from the Cracket used in the home never had a hole in as it had long legs and you could pick it up bt the top edge. Those with holes in were locally called "Farty Crackets" as they would let the gas out. {-)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 05, 2009, 07:01:38 PM
    :-))   Superb Work Brian, you must have the constitution of a horse to keep going.
On the subject of "Crackets" they originated in the coal mines and were used by the Hewers to sit on when they were working in coal seams which had a lot of water flowing through them.  They had very short legs just enough to keer the man's bum out of the water. The hole in the top was a different shape in different areas and was used to pick them up. Where I came from the Cracket used in the home never had a hole in as it had long legs and you could pick it up bt the top edge. Those with holes in were locally called "Farty Crackets" as they would let the gas out. {-)

Well ,one lives and learns! I suppose by birth I'm more of a Mackem than a Geordie (although time erodes these minor differences). But although we had "crackets" about the place my parents were pretty typical of the era and would never even admit that the word "farty" existed. It's quite amazing how strait-laced and conservative (with a small "c") lower working class people actually were. Bless them! Cheers, BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 06, 2009, 10:12:22 AM
   :-))   Superb Work Brian, you must have the constitution of a horse to keep going.
On the subject of "Crackets" they originated in the coal mines and were used by the Hewers to sit on when they were working in coal seams which had a lot of water flowing through them.  They had very short legs just enough to keer the man's bum out of the water. The hole in the top was a different shape in different areas and was used to pick them up. Where I came from the Cracket used in the home never had a hole in as it had long legs and you could pick it up bt the top edge. Those with holes in were locally called "Farty Crackets" as they would let the gas out. {-)



Thanks Mackem for explaining the very interesting origins of something I thought of as nothing more than a wooden stool.  :-)) Just goes to show you nothing is as it seems !
Great vents Bryan, what did you use to hold down the tie wraps/gear teeth ? I have found that some types of plastic don't adhere to Araldite and haven't found an alternative  

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 06, 2009, 07:17:25 PM
Mike. I found (after great expense) that the only superglue I could find that would stick the tie=wraps to plasticard is "Grip". Locktite just turned up a snooty nose at it. Having said that, I have pinned the ends that will be covered by the small drive cog. Cheers. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 06, 2009, 07:22:41 PM
Just a couple of record shots.  Interior 'cos it's wet outside and I don't want to get the boat wet (yet).
They really show how big a difference they make to the overall aspect of the model. Still some way to go yet!
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 07, 2009, 07:39:10 AM
Thanks Bryan  :-)) Tip duly stored away in brainbox, hopefully in a recoverable compartment !  :-X

Mike

PS That shade of yellow looks just about right (Now tell me you havn't changed it !!) The green sidelight box seems to stand out a bit in the picture if I may be so bold ?  :embarrassed:
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 07, 2009, 08:58:18 AM
It has been bugging me since I wrote the above ! (The sidelights) How dare I criticize someone who obviously has forgotten more about model making than I have learned so far. O0  On looking again it probably was the flash bounce giving a false shade of green ? No offence meant Bryan !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 07, 2009, 06:14:56 PM
It has been bugging me since I wrote the above ! (The sidelights) How dare I criticize someone who obviously has forgotten more about model making than I have learned so far. O0  On looking again it probably was the flash bounce giving a false shade of green ? No offence meant Bryan !

Mike
Mike, criticise away, all you like. Consructive (or even "destructive") criticism is always welcome to me. Unless it's of the "carping and trivial" sort. I always take note of what is said, and either accept or reject...but always consider. The "green" was indeed due to the flash....but now I think the funnel is too pale! "xxxxx" it. It's staying the way it is! Finished the vents off today (the spindle turning gear). Now to do the electrical bit, unless I find some odds and ends to do on the upperworks. Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 07, 2009, 06:20:27 PM
Mike, criticise away, all you like. Consructive (or even "destructive") criticism is always welcome to me. Unless it's of the "carping and trivial" sort. I always take note of what is said, and either accept or reject...but always consider. The "green" was indeed due to the flash....but now I think the funnel is too pale! "xxxxx" it. It's staying the way it is! Finished the vents off today (the spindle turning gear). Now to do the electrical bit, unless I find some odds and ends to do on the upperworks. Cheers. Bryan.
As a rider to the above, if you enlarge the page you will see that your rice bowl has sort of pride of place!. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 07, 2009, 07:15:29 PM
Rats and all the other expletives that come to mind. After posting the last answer I had another look at an old colour photo. And the funnel is definitely darker than I have it at the moment. Feeling a bit stymied at the present time...and more than a bit annoyed. Still, needs must, and so another search begins! Not a happy bunny at the moment. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 08, 2009, 07:47:38 AM
Just blown up the pic and checked out my bowl !Quite chuffed at being a tiny part of a great model  O0 Hope you finally get the colours to your satisfaction. With only the doubtful aid of memory the funnel was a pale yellow as opposed to a 'buttery' hue, Must have a look at pictures of E.D ships and see if there is a resemblance
Cheers

Mike

Never thought it was so long ago that black and white was the norm ! Finally found one in colour and it might be near what I was imagining :  http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=25751
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 12, 2009, 06:49:20 PM
At last had a day when the sun wasn't either too bright or too dull. So the following pics are of today (12 sept '09).
2579a:- A pretty standard layout. The "tray" is 1/4" perspex. "On and Off" switches are marked. Wiring needs a bit more tidying up.
2582a:- "Main" deck in place. Shows main lifting handle for deck removal.
2586a and 2587a:- "Funnel deck" plonked in place and ready to go. But not yet.
Might take it to the lake tomorrow and give it a first ballast check. Depends on the weather.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 13, 2009, 07:49:40 AM
She's beautiful Bryan ! Bon voyage if the weather is favourable. Eventualy are you going to stick the vehicles down or just scatter them a la cushions ?  %) I would imagine she will be so stable that nothing is going to slide around !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 13, 2009, 12:58:28 PM
Went down to the lake this morning and the weed is back thick enough to play cricket on. What a dreadful year for us this has been. I think I've only had a boat out twice.
As far as the vehicles are concerned I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've got some from manufacturers in Mexico, China and "Europe". And they all seem to have their own idea what constitutes 1:24 scale!. They look ridiculous when placed together. However, once I get sorted out I'll have to come up with some way of fastening them down, otherwise they'll get nicked. But also, I'd like to be able to "ring the changes" now and again. The same applies to people. I've ordered some so called 1:24 jobs, but the "catalogue" states that they are approx 3.4" tall, which makes them nearer 7ft tall in "real" life! So a bit of "cutting and shutting" will be called for! Really, how on earth can manufacturers get it so damned wrong! Bryan.
PS....I thought the only bright lights showing on Teeside came from whatever industry down there is still working. Be even dimmer when they all have to fit "energy saving" lamps. Now I see that "they" want to ban "spotlights" and so on. Where will it all end? In tears and rage I expect.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 13, 2009, 03:04:28 PM
Surely a "Beetle" isn't that much larger than a Moggie? And is a Beetle really almost the size of a Camper Van? But all sold as being 1:24!
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 13, 2009, 07:41:00 PM
See what you mean about the 'elastic' 1/24th vehicles ! Agree with you that a Beetle was never as big as a VW Camper and the Traveller must have been around the same size as the Beetle !
Nice (and sad) to see what's left of Smith's and the surrounds, I bet the apartments in the old 'Jungle' building are worth a few bob now, even more so when they don't have to put up with Jolly Jack and that bird Flora and all their pals making merry  ok2 . Now I see why the Crane pub was boarded up, an unusual idea but at least it preserved a bit of the atmosphere of the area.

If the weed problem persists, you could always visit the Shiels Club  %) I'm sure John would love to see you. Come to think of it I havn't seen him on the forum for a while. Hope he is ok.
Are you reading this John ? You ok ?

We're off to Cyprus in the morning for three weeks house-sitting - tough eh ! I'm not sure if their computer is working, so I might have some catching up on here in three weeks time.

Regards

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ZZ56 on September 14, 2009, 10:24:30 PM
Went down to the lake this morning and the weed is back thick enough to play cricket on. What a dreadful year for us this has been. I think I've only had a boat out twice.
As far as the vehicles are concerned I'm in a bit of a quandary. I've got some from manufacturers in Mexico, China and "Europe". And they all seem to have their own idea what constitutes 1:24 scale!. They look ridiculous when placed together. However, once I get sorted out I'll have to come up with some way of fastening them down, otherwise they'll get nicked. But also, I'd like to be able to "ring the changes" now and again. The same applies to people. I've ordered some so called 1:24 jobs, but the "catalogue" states that they are approx 3.4" tall, which makes them nearer 7ft tall in "real" life! So a bit of "cutting and shutting" will be called for! Really, how on earth can manufacturers get it so damned wrong! Bryan.
PS....I thought the only bright lights showing on Teeside came from whatever industry down there is still working. Be even dimmer when they all have to fit "energy saving" lamps. Now I see that "they" want to ban "spotlights" and so on. Where will it all end? In tears and rage I expect.

Brian,

Have you looked into Revell's 1:25th scale car kit lineup?  The difference would be negligeable and from what I've seen, they are true-to-scale. 
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 14, 2009, 10:58:37 PM
Brian,

Have you looked into Revell's 1:25th scale car kit lineup?  The difference would be negligeable and from what I've seen, they are true-to-scale. 
Ta for that. I'll give it a swing and see what comes up.  Cheers. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 27, 2009, 05:34:48 PM
What a great day at the lake! The weed has retreated a bit and so I could finally do a ballast check on the ferry. As always I find these first trials/checks a bit nerve wracking, especially when done in public....and under the friendly but somewhat jaundiced eye of our friend "Nemesis" (he didn't half choose his pen name well!). Actually, he's always a great help when it's needed.
But to my absolute delight "she" settled beautifully, and is absolutely stable. The square "box" in the middle of the boat weighs 26lb (I use it in "Baroda") and the front as yet unboxed lump at the front is about 12lb. So including the 2 batteries that will all come to around 50lb. The full hull and upperworks at roughly 30lb will therefore give me an AUW of perhaps 80lb. A bit under my original guestimate (although I could make it a bit deeper in the water if I need to).
Now to spend a few weeks wiring the it up correctly, and making "cradles" for the batteries and ballast blocks (to prevent them sliding around, and to make placement easier).
Honestly, I'm really chuffed now. It's been a bit of a slog at times, and it's so nice to see the model actually floating the way I imagined. The cars and passengers will soon be embarking, and some interior lights will come on as son as I can find a club member who knows how to wire up LEDs (me and electronics have a mutual antipathy).
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 27, 2009, 05:52:56 PM
Well done Bryan, that second picture could almost be the real thing except for the lack of people!

Looking very good indeed.

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 27, 2009, 06:00:18 PM
Well done Bryan, that second picture could almost be the real thing except for the lack of people!

Looking very good indeed.

Colin
Just give me a little more time (a song title?). After that post, I think I'll make one of the passengers into a Bishop....any particular denomination? Perhaps a mullah me be more suitable! Thanks anyway. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 27, 2009, 06:54:11 PM
No need to represent me Bryan, I'm sure there are enough mitre joints in the model already....

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: hama on September 27, 2009, 07:27:05 PM
Congratulations! She looks super, I agree with Colin that she looks like the real one in that second pic ( OK, I haven't seen the real one but anyway ). Now some pictures of her decks full of "cargo" and her underway would be great!
All the best.
Hama
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 27, 2009, 07:29:31 PM
No need to represent me Bryan, I'm sure there are enough mitre joints in the model already....

Colin
Colin, not quite the response I anticipated...but all the more welcome for it.
A touch more seriosly though, a guy I know in Barcelona with a huge model railway layout models and sort of names on people on people he has known. Nice ones and nasty ones. I intend to follow his example. At 1:24 scale I think I can do it. During my long and still ongoing cataloguing of ancient MB mags I have come across an early 1980s pic of you doing some judging. So the model may be of a "young" version. Hope you don't mind. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 27, 2009, 07:41:12 PM
Congratulations! She looks super, I agree with Colin that she looks like the real one in that second pic ( OK, I haven't seen the real one but anyway ). Now some pictures of her decks full of "cargo" and her underway would be great!
All the best.
Hama
Thanks Hama. As I said, these were taken during initial ballasting trials. I do have some vehicles to place. But my idea is to have a "stock" of them so I can "ring the changes" as I feel fit. At the moment I'm musing over the idea of putting fixed fastening bolts upwards through the deck and make the corresponding fittings in the vehicles. But it (the ferry) is not a motor museum. I want it to be a ship model. Alas, I do acknowledge that "viewers" will pick up more on the cars, vans and people and ignore the boat. I'll have to learn to live with that. Unhappily.
Thanks for your reply. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 27, 2009, 07:46:42 PM
Immortalised on a Tyne ferry - who could ask for more?

Colin
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 27, 2009, 10:47:38 PM
Immortalised on a Tyne ferry - who could ask for more?

Colin
maybe more like immorlised? Mortifed? or even immotrilised. Who knows. A bit like wriring a book and the characters just keep on leading you in. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 28, 2009, 06:44:09 AM
Just caught up on your latest submissions and she looks absolutely great.  :-)) As has been said, that second picture could have been the real thing (and I have seen it !) I'm dying to make some silly pun about bishops and bashing them too much but I'll bite my tongue !
At the her weight and beam, she must have a 'presence' on the water. I bet she hardly moves to the waves.
Lovely stuff !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 28, 2009, 04:34:14 PM
Just caught up on your latest submissions and she looks absolutely great.  :-)) As has been said, that second picture could have been the real thing (and I have seen it !) I'm dying to make some silly pun about bishops and bashing them too much but I'll bite my tongue !
At the her weight and beam, she must have a 'presence' on the water. I bet she hardly moves to the waves.
Lovely stuff !

Mike
Mike, nice to hear from you again. I was really pleased with how easily she ballasted down. But I was completely surprised at how difficult it is to get the thing to "roll". Very hard pushing down on a side doesn't seem to make much difference to her "stance". Being a more or less "round" hull with no bilge keels I expected a certain amount of rolling and recovery...nope, she just wants to sit upright. All the time. I'll see what happens when I put the vehicles on the deck. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: sentry on September 28, 2009, 09:04:53 PM
Bryan you have brought part of the Tyne back to life thank you Sentry.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: madrob on September 28, 2009, 11:02:56 PM
The on the water shots are superb, and unusual subject but what a fantastic one, i take my hat of to you bryan
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 28, 2009, 11:17:24 PM
Bryan,
Looking at that all-up weight, this is a rupture-inducing bit of (beautiful) kit. Is the ballast portable - to be fitted once afloat or do you have a fork-lift truck?

Regards

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 29, 2009, 05:34:37 PM
Bryan,
Looking at that all-up weight, this is a rupture-inducing bit of (beautiful) kit. Is the ballast portable - to be fitted once afloat or do you have a fork-lift truck?

Regards

Barry M
Ah,Barry.....I presume you didn't read the preamble before viewing the pics! The whole caboodle is reasonably easily taken from wherever and put in the water. Most of my models are pretty heavy (ranging from 20lb to 110lb), so I've used what I call "handbags" to carry and place the ballast and batteries in place once the hull is in the water. The only (slight) problem with the ferry is the beam of the thing (23"), so I have to be extra careful not to clobber the side ramps when carrying/lifting it. I've found that the easiest way to carry it is, after lifting out of the trailer, just to twist the hull so the keel points outwards and the stbd side points towards the ground. Better balance for both me and the boat that way. By the way, can you recall what "Flora" looked like? I'll put her in as well....during an "off-duty" period. Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 29, 2009, 06:03:18 PM
Bryan,

So little time and too many tasks! This plus finally admitting to myself what I had been trying hard to ignore; that an almost completed plug is just not right and will have to be remodelled.  Drat and double drat - or something like that  <:(

However, all is now clear and I am left with the mental picture of you and your handbags!

Flora, as  I recall, was a sweet girl filling in time as Resident Flower Arranger at the Jungle while awaiting the call to the Low Street Nunnery. She drank Newcastle Broon out of seaboots and was always ready to do Good Works for passing matelots.

Surely you remember her?  %)

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 29, 2009, 06:51:00 PM
I do hope we are not sliding into Actresses and Bishops here..... :P
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 29, 2009, 07:07:37 PM
Bryan,

So little time and too many tasks! This plus finally admitting to myself what I had been trying hard to ignore; that an almost completed plug is just not right and will have to be remodelled.  Drat and double drat - or something like that  <:(

However, all is now clear and I am left with the mental picture of you and your handbags!

Flora, as  I recall, was a sweet girl filling in time as Resident Flower Arranger at the Jungle while awaiting the call to the Low Street Nunnery. She drank Newcastle Broon out of seaboots and was always ready to do Good Works for passing matelots.

Surely you remember her?  %)

Barry M
I think so. but she was too old (and worn) for me....but I can't recall the seaboots. Just the nuns "habit". BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 29, 2009, 07:08:51 PM
I do hope we are not sliding into Actresses and Bishops here..... :P
I suggest you choose your words more carefully......BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 29, 2009, 07:35:08 PM
Oh yes!  "Surrey Man found committing double entendre in the Forum." . I can just see the headlines.  :o

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 29, 2009, 07:49:05 PM
Quadruple Barry, I don't do things by halves..... ;)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 29, 2009, 08:00:46 PM
As the Actress said to the Bishop?

BM
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Colin Bishop on September 29, 2009, 08:03:34 PM
 :} :} :}
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 30, 2009, 06:07:14 AM
Bryan,

So little time and too many tasks! This plus finally admitting to myself what I had been trying hard to ignore; that an almost completed plug is just not right and will have to be remodelled.  Drat and double drat - or something like that  <:(

However, all is now clear and I am left with the mental picture of you and your handbags!

Flora, as  I recall, was a sweet girl filling in time as Resident Flower Arranger at the Jungle while awaiting the call to the Low Street Nunnery. She drank Newcastle Broon out of seaboots and was always ready to do Good Works for passing matelots.

Surely you remember her?  %)

Barry M

BE CAREFUL !! From the description you are talking about my Aunt Florrie, a fine upstanding friend of the Merchant Marine and not averse to taking pity on any unfortunate shipyard worker as well, may she rest in peace  %) %)

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 30, 2009, 02:03:11 PM
Mike,

Never for a moment would I cast doubt on the reputation of your Aunt Florrie (the “Sailors’ Friend”) who was well known for her charitable works. Why even her away-days to Betty’s Bar in Glasgow are still spoken of with some affection and, indeed, awe.

No, the Flora of whom I write had a far darker past which has been obscured by time and the Demon Broon Ale. Few people know that she was actually Fraulein Flora, the daughter of  Helmut Von und Oanlie and Ilse Von Aloan, conceived in an experiment to produce Hitler’s Ultimate Terror Weapon.

Shipped as deck cargo and landed by submarine at Whitley Bay, it was intended that she would shorten the war by causing havoc amongst local matelots but, seduced by the Demon Broon Ale, she threw in her lot (and it was a big lot) with the Allies and elected to raise the matelots spirits with her charitable works instead.

An imposing figure, modelled on a cross between Giant Haystacks and a Sumo wrestler with Desperate Dan’s chin (and his stubble), her peroxide locks tamed by a hairnet donated by a grateful trawler crew, she could be relied upon to keep order in the bar with one imperious sweep of her handbag. The fact that her handbag was usually weighted with old pipe flanges could not but help.

Confronted by this figure and her demands, few could resist – even when they wanted to – and often they were later grateful - usually when they were put down again. 

There is a rumour that Flora did find True Love in the arms of an Irish stoker who lost his way in the fog of Demon Broon Ale and a child was the result. Unable to keep the child, it was left on the steps of the Broon Brewery and raised by a couple who nothing of his background. The child was sent to sea with the RFA to keep him innocent and away from the Demon Broon. Alas, he still fell to temptation and was found in bars from Stanley to Sydney and Portsmouth to Malta.  It is said that the child, now a broken-down former seaman returned and settled in North Shields to ensure a regular supply of Broon Ale.

And Flora – what happened to her? Nobody really knows; perhaps she did enter a nunnery, perhaps not. But it is said that when mist wraps Tyneside in its oily embrace and the smell of Demon Broon hangs heavy in the air, seamen still look fearfully over their shoulders in case a heavy phantom hand descends on their shoulder, a pipe flange is heard to rattle in a tattered handbag and a ghostly baritone sounds in their ear with the fateful words, “Want an ‘orrible time, sailor?” 

Be afraid, be very afraid,

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 30, 2009, 02:39:49 PM
We really do diversify on this thread...and all the more fun because of it. I guess that now I'll have to model a bard...perhaps 2, as you made no reference to the poor mites coat of many colours as mentioned by "Bluebird". But you (both) are factually incorrect. I hate, and always have, the Demon Broon. (Except perhaps Oor Wullie). As for the "other" Broon, the less said the better. It's surprising that such large Teutonic figures should produce such an insignificant little runt. Perhaps mother wasn't concentrating, what with everything else she was involved in. I never met "dad"....but he could have been a Lascar from over the water for all I know. Alas, the imbibing over on the South Shore had to come to an end as I found the bars becoming higher as I got older, and toting mothers weighted handbags for so many years (her only legacy to me) meant that although I avoided rickets many were ther impolite queries regarding my long arms and short legs. However, after vainly searching the entire planet in the company of a mad Dutchman for a spiritual home, I finally arrived at the doors of "Model Boat Mayhem" and to my delight found so many like minded loopy ( I hesitate over this word) "people". Long may it last. B von Y.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on September 30, 2009, 03:20:31 PM
BarryM please accept my apologies for thinking you were casting aspersions on my dear old aunt Florrie. The Florrie of your acquaintance sounds a much more formidable lady, did she once frequent the Mechanics Arms in Shields by any chance ? perhaps under an alias for she certainly sounds familiar  :o
To you both I lift my rug as no way can I join you on such flights of entertaining fancy  O0 %%

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on September 30, 2009, 04:40:49 PM
Gentlemen,

I confess to feeling somewhat guilty; a) for revealing the secret of Flora and b) diverting Bryan's excellent thread on the Northumbrian.

My apologies,

Barry M

PS. We never got round to Fauna - now she was a girl (subject to medical confirmation).  %)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 30, 2009, 05:29:57 PM
Life IS a diversion. and building models in any form (apart from a female Frankenstein) is just part of the diversion. I welcome diversions. So do most people, I suspect. I really cannot see the personal benefit (except in cash terms) of having the work ethic of say the USA,China....oh, probably the rest of the world really. After a working "life" it's rather nice to be free of all that and just enjoy whatever comes along....with a bit of a nudge here and there. Keep up the banter. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on September 30, 2009, 07:08:44 PM
Gentlemen,

I confess to feeling somewhat guilty; a) for revealing the secret of Flora and b) diverting Bryan's excellent thread on the Northumbrian.

My apologies,

Barry M

PS. We never got round to Fauna - now she was a girl (subject to medical confirmation).  %)
I think someone once told me that I had had a sister. The history, as I was once told it by a female bulbous bow lifter, was that after she had gained her 1st class degree (from Hartlepool University) in Biological Stimulation she went on to become an unknown recluse in a town called Peeterheed. Where I believe she ate fish and succumbed to a disease that only enhanced her resemblance to a Haddock. I believe that she was sort of buried in the N.Sea from a certificated biologically clean transient oil-rig. There is still an exclusion zone around this rig extending for 200 miles (seawards) from the town that emits poisonous gasses . Some apologists blame this on the underlying rock, but I have my doubts. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 18, 2009, 04:07:40 PM
Finally got the old girl fitted out with vehicles and passengers (including Flora who, in typical fashion is shown letting it all hang out whilst chatting up a young guy who doesn't want to know...but I enjoyed painting her). Alas all the vehicles are left-hand drive as it would appear the only manufacturers these days are non-British. Even the guy reading the paper is readind a German one.  Everyhing went well apart from the rudder linkage coming adrift, but with both screws running (both turning outwards ) she was just as easy to steer on the throttles alone. Easily "fixable". I still fervently wish that the makers of the cars wouldn't stamp them 1:24 when quite plainly they are not all to the same scale when plonked on the deck. All I could do to reduce the visual anomaly was to space the obvious ones as far apart as possible.
So, dear followers of this thread, I've more or less done the job I set out to do over a year ago, and treating the build as a more or less full time job. A lot of work, even more thought and planning (I can afford to forget the problems now), and..of course..not forgetting the comfort and resilience given by the Laughing Cavalier. ("To copy it is Forgery", as it says on the tin). I may take some close-ups of the passengers, but that's "sometime".
Thanks for the moral help and comments.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on October 18, 2009, 04:25:28 PM
Bryan,

Beautiful job with a very realistic finish. You can be very proud of that one.

I bet Flora Von und Oanlie would hug her little Bryan to her Bazooms - as long as the platoon of DLI would move over to make space.  %)

Cheers and more of the Laughing Cavalier all round

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on October 18, 2009, 05:05:46 PM
Any chance of a close up of Auntie Flora then BY...

I'm not of a nervous disposition and wonder how well you have captured Von Und Oanlie at 1:24 plastic....???

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on October 18, 2009, 06:08:36 PM
Greg,

Wake up at the back there! Check the thread again to find out the true relationship between Flora Von Und Oanlie and Herr Bryan.

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 18, 2009, 07:12:04 PM
Any chance of a close up of Auntie Flora then BY...

I'm not of a nervous disposition and wonder how well you have captured Von Und Oanlie at 1:24 plastic....???

Greg
Wait. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: sentry on October 18, 2009, 10:45:15 PM
Bryan,
Thank you for a great build and sharing it with us as you went,A nice model to most but to me more then that so many memories of my childhood  and of when the Tyne was a great river and not just as a nice walk as it is now, With great model makers like your self it gives me inspiration to try and made my next one even better.
                                                  Regards , Sentry.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 18, 2009, 10:49:08 PM
Bryan,
Thank you for a great build and sharing it with us as you went,A nice model to most but to me more then that so many memories of my childhood  and of when the Tyne was a great river and not just as a nice walk as it is now, With great model makers like your self it gives me inspiration to try and made my next one even better.
                                                  Regards , Sentry.
Thanks for that. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: ZZ56 on October 18, 2009, 11:19:04 PM
Care to give away your secret for that fantastic black finish?  It's not too dark nor too grey. 
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on October 19, 2009, 09:00:51 AM
Bryan,
Thank you for a great build and sharing it with us as you went,A nice model to most but to me more then that so many memories of my childhood  and of when the Tyne was a great river and not just as a nice walk as it is now, With great model makers like your self it gives me inspiration to try and made my next one even better.
                                                  Regards , Sentry.

Couldn't have said it better, thanks Bryan for the sharing  O0

Mike

PS Looks like some pretty posh passengers were taking their cars ower the watter, she must be coming North to South ??  %)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: derekwarner on October 19, 2009, 09:53:45 AM
Superb photograph Bryan.....'Northumbrian' 19.10.09 - just for interest....over the past day we have been talking about vessel displacement  O0 ...so what does your build of 'Northumbrian' ...displace? .....regards Derek
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: derekwarner on October 19, 2009, 10:24:56 AM
OK....just reread ...........19th  August 2008 of .....which will give an all-up weight of around 87lb (gulp)...so how close is that weight?  {-)  %%................Derek
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 19, 2009, 11:08:22 AM
Care to give away your secret for that fantastic black finish?  It's not too dark nor too grey. 
No secret at all. The vents are sprayed with Humbrol Satin Black...3 light coats.
The smaller black bits are either one coat of matt black coated with 1 of satin black (tinlets), but I think the best black of all is the Humbrol tinlet of "Coal Black"....i think they do an aerosol of it and I would have used that if I could have found any locally. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 19, 2009, 11:17:44 AM
OK....just reread ...........19th  August 2008 of .....which will give an all-up weight of around 87lb (gulp)...so how close is that weight?  {-)  %%................Derek
Actually I guessed it would be heavier that it is. I think I originally assumed (thought, guessed whatever) that the hull was more "brick-shaped" than is the case. Particularly around the aft third of the hull, so it comes in at around 74lb. Not such a bad guess really from way back when I just had a bare hull and guessed the CoF.
Mind if I go on a bit more?
The bare hull with motors in and deck removed for carrying is about 20lb. Easy to actually lift, but the width(beam) of the thing plus the height of the ramps (5" or so) makes it a bit awkward to carry unless I twist the hull so the top is facing me. The 2 batteries are standard 12v-20a/h things. Main ballast is the 22lb "handbag". I like this method of ballasting as I use the lead I borrow from various public buildings (after all, I am part of the public, so I already own part of it) Cut the lead into 6" squares and lay yhe squares into the ally box until it's about right. (this way I can adjust the ballast for more than one model. Secondary "trimming" sheets are made up for each model. The rest of the weight is made up by the top decks and "sundries". Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on October 19, 2009, 05:55:29 PM
Hope I'm not boring you rigid, but being such a grotty afternoon up here I thought I'd do the passenger pics. Most of them are self explanatory. I particularly like Mr.Glum. And Flora taking full advantage of every opportunity. Hope you like them.
(The pics are probably 2x the actual size).
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Tug-Kenny on October 19, 2009, 09:14:35 PM

Superb build, Brian. I watched every step of the way. Well done.  :-))  :-))  :-))

ken


Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on December 23, 2009, 04:46:01 PM
As long suffering passengers on this scruffy old tub, we would all like to thank you for your patience....as we had to do for nearly a year. We all got to know each other quite well during the long wait, but poor Flora (being "self-employed, as it were) was left quite denuded (of cash, that is). The baby in the pram is now in school, the Norton motorbike is now a collectors item. Alas. the elderly lady and the gentleman reading his book both passed away on the maiden voyage. The NUFC supporter missed the trauma of the relegation, but ias apparently quite happy with the present situation. The "Glums" (bottom right) seperated when she wandered off to buy another packet of fags and couldn't find her way back to the landing stage. He smiles more nowadays. The "runner" with the 2 bags was arrested and given a caution for having only 20kg of something or other as it was for his personal (ab)use. Apart from that they are all doing well, and wish you all a very happy Xmas and a happy next years boating.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian ferry"
Post by: Shipwrecked on April 11, 2010, 04:50:40 PM
Beautifully model Bryan and saw it this weekend at the North East Model Boat Show at Temple Park and well done on a well deserved 2nd prize ...and correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that Barada (Best of Show and 1st in catagory) is yours as well and an outstanding bit of work. :-))
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 12, 2010, 06:33:58 PM
"Shipwrecked"....nice comments, thank you.
I'll tell you a little story about the show....if your'e interested.
The 2009 show (the first) didn't supply as many tables to TMBC as had been promised, and so all our boats / ships were crammed up sisde by side with really only the bows of the models visible. Not very pleasing to either the entrants or the visiting spectators. On the "assumption" that the same thing would happen again this year many of us at TMBC reduced their entries to allow more space. For myself, I was only going to enter "Northumbrian" as opposed to the 4 or 5 models I generally send to shows. Other club members did the same. So on the friday before the show opened when we took the models it was more than a bit of an eye-opener to discover that we had been allocated a huge stand..so really we could have shown more models without them being crammed up.
In "normal" circumstances the club hires a big van to transport the entered models. For reasons that I won't go into, the van didn't materialise so club members had to transport their own boats in their own cars. This obviously put a bit of a limit as to what could be transported. As I said, I had only entered "Northumbrian", but as "Baroda" was already in the trailer where it lives I dragged that along as well. When I got to the venue I thought how sparse the stand looked...and so Brian (brian_c) sort of coerced me into putting "Baroda" on to the stand. Then (!) he said he was going to enter it into the "competition"...nothing to do with me 'guv. So now the same ship has got 2 "best in show" awards that were totally unexpected. I'm quite sure that if some of our other "ship-builders" had known that our stand was to be so large, there would have been more models shown that are equally as good as "Baroda".
When I went back to collect my boats at the end of the show I was approached by a fellow modeller who was quite adamant that the "Northumbrian" should have all the vehicles and passengers removed as they were not part of "the model". I disagreed. After all, it is a model of a river ferry, and its stock in trade was to transport people and vehicles from one side of the Tyne to the other...so as far as I'm concerned they all remain where they are. Anyway, I don't build models to go "cup-hunting", I just do it to please myself.
The "Northumbrian" very nearly didn't make it to the stand at all. About half a mile from the venue the trailer dropped into a huge pothole...in the rear view car mirror I saw the model lift violently out of its cradle and my heart sank. With good reason. Without going into details a lot of work was needed with the aid of some superglue kindly loaned by a member of another club. (Green jersey, you know who you are, thanks, you were a life-saver!). BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: John W E on April 12, 2010, 06:52:18 PM
Hi ya there Bryan

Let's explain why I said the figures should be removed from your model.   In my eyes - its like putting furry dice in a Rolls Royce - just a thing not to be done.

Your standard of build is of a very very high quality and the standard of vehicles and figures look a bit of a low quality - so therefore not matching your high standards of workmanship.

However, mind, my wife Margaret, disagrees completely with me - and she thinks they add a good deal of character.

What you must do Bryan, is leave the model the way you feel - take a pic of her on the water and show the photo in black and white - it will look smashing.   I have a pic of her illustrated on an 'old' postcard (black and white) and it does look authentic.

Keep on building - whats next.

John
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on April 12, 2010, 06:56:58 PM
Bryan,

Tell Flora to get off? It would take a brave man to do that.

Congratulations and well done. Wish I could have made it this year.

Regards

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: yorkiej on April 13, 2010, 12:23:12 AM
I saw your 'Northumbrian' at South Shields on Sunday.
I must say that I thought it was superb. The attention to detail was second to none for such an unusual subject.
My pal, who does not model, but appreciates the finer points as a critic, thought that it was first class. He used to see the real thing and thinks that he 'cruised' on it a few times along with his motor bike and moll !!!
Very well done.
Did you win a prize? If not, why not!
Cheers
John  :-)) :-)) :-)) :-) :-) :}
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 13, 2010, 11:43:00 AM
Hi ya there Bryan

Let's explain why I said the figures should be removed from your model.   In my eyes - its like putting furry dice in a Rolls Royce - just a thing not to be done.

Your standard of build is of a very very high quality and the standard of vehicles and figures look a bit of a low quality - so therefore not matching your high standards of workmanship.

However, mind, my wife Margaret, disagrees completely with me - and she thinks they add a good deal of character.

What you must do Bryan, is leave the model the way you feel - take a pic of her on the water and show the photo in black and white - it will look smashing.   I have a pic of her illustrated on an 'old' postcard (black and white) and it does look authentic.

Keep on building - whats next.

John

John...I like the idea of doing a "black and white" version. Why didn't I think of that first!
I disagree with you re the quality of the vehicles, but I'll meet you half way about the figures. Two reasons for this. The first is that I didn't really want the figures to overshadow the model, perhaps I wasn't as successful there as I wished. Secondly, (and this isn't an excuse), this ARMD in my right eye makes modelling (especially painting of small bits) almost impossible. This second reason is why I'll probably not be able to build another model, much as I would like to. I'm attempting a "rebuild" / refurbishment / repairs on c/s "Norseman" but find that doing perhaps an hour at a time is my eyesights limit. All a bit of a b....r really.
Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 13, 2010, 01:11:04 PM
Like these any better,John?
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Martin [Admin] on April 13, 2010, 01:42:29 PM
 :-)
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on April 13, 2010, 05:27:04 PM
My offering, hope it evokes some memories in thanks for such a wonderful build.

Greg

PS- just to let you know-

-smoke from the funnel and soot marks to it's rear
-steam from the whistle
-land rover exhaust choking the other passengers
-marker bouy and black headed gull
-black headed gulls floating
-water at bow and stern 'chopped' a bit as scale speed never produces scale waves.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 13, 2010, 05:40:50 PM
I love it! Anyone else wanting a go? Love the smoke.....only wish I could doit for "real".....Thanks, Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 13, 2010, 05:49:07 PM
I saw your 'Northumbrian' at South Shields on Sunday.
I must say that I thought it was superb. The attention to detail was second to none for such an unusual subject.
My pal, who does not model, but appreciates the finer points as a critic, thought that it was first class. He used to see the real thing and thinks that he 'cruised' on it a few times along with his motor bike and moll !!!
Very well done.
Did you win a prize? If not, why not!
Cheers
John  :-)) :-)) :-)) :-) :-) :}
Yorkie..thanks for your comments. The model only came in 3rd in its class....I say "only", but without regrets. I'm pleased that Tynesiders and others who recall these grotty, ancient but loveable things were reminded of days gone by. As I've said before, I build for my own amusement and hopefully to engender interest from others......matters not one jot if I "win" or not. Check out Gondoliers take on it. Lovely. BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: bubbles on April 18, 2010, 06:58:31 PM
hi brian nice to see you at the lake today with your model,looking good, are you looking to do anything else mate or is the age thing keeping you from doing anymore builds :-)) >>:-( <*<
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Perkasaman2 on April 18, 2010, 08:27:55 PM
The Northumbrian is so much more than an unusual model subject.  I also visited the show and enjoyed the wonderful display of model boats yet this ferry was unequivocally my favourite........ I'm not usually a fan of commercial subjects.  :-))
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 19, 2010, 06:28:15 PM
Perkasaman: Thank you. Building the ferry seems to be a sort of fitting epitaph to my model ship/building "career"...but never say never. Perhaps the pic can transport you back awhile, when travel was so much more simple.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on April 20, 2010, 08:04:55 AM
Now that has to be the North Shields landing, judging by the luxury limo's coming off from Sandancer country ! Thanks for the picture Bryan (and the memories it evokes )

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: gondolier88 on April 20, 2010, 10:20:20 AM
Do RelRobs's work that far north?!

Greg
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Perkasaman2 on April 20, 2010, 02:28:12 PM
The Northumbrian is a pearl. She carries the spirit of the original, linking hearts and hands over the waters. The authenticity of the build is hallmarked in the thread ............ a distillation of impeccable research and a life'sworth of experience 'jelled'  in the reconstruction........ you cannot give more. In my book, you've won the ultimate  competition......... the only one that really matters........... the one you set for yourself.  :-))

Deep down I hope Florry found her man and that her 'special'  boat came in.

Forgive me for tacking on our song. (One for lyrics and the second for the true melody as I remember it.)

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz2U6HcG318&feature=related

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAQxxJPrWns&feature=related






  

Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on April 20, 2010, 02:56:17 PM
Do RelRobs's work that far north?!

Greg

If you pedal fast enough - Yes.  %)

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on April 20, 2010, 04:17:30 PM
If you pedal fast enough - Yes.  %)

Barry M

'Specially up Borough Bank !
Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 20, 2010, 07:09:14 PM
The Northumbrian is a pearl. She carries the spirit of the original, linking hearts and hands over the waters. The authenticity of the build is hallmarked in the thread ............ a distillation of impeccable research and a life'sworth of experience 'jelled'  in the reconstruction........ you cannot give more. In my book, you've won the ultimate  competition......... the only one that really matters........... the one you set for yourself.  :-))

Deep down I hope Florry found her man and that her 'special'  boat came in.

Forgive me for tacking on our song. (One for lyrics and the second for the true melody as I remember it.)

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz2U6HcG318&feature=related

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAQxxJPrWns&feature=related

All very poetic....you'll be writing me love odes next. But it's the thought that counts (or so I've heard).
But in all honesty (I was going to say "humility", but that's not in my nature), I've been (reasonably) amazed at the reaction of members of this forum who have nver even heard of these old wrecks, never mind actually seein them or travelling on one. But I really regret never actually taking much notice of the "thing" as a (sort of) ship. I couldn't have built it without access to the photos Bill (Cap'n) Thomson of TMBC took while he was building his tin-plate model of her back in the 70s.
I don't normally have the speakers on but if "Fog on the Tyne" is one of your toons I will (if I eventually meet you) either give you a cuddle or a Glaswegian kiss.....yet to be decided. Thanks anyway. Bryan.






  


Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 20, 2010, 07:17:16 PM
'Specially up Borough Bank !
Mike
Mike, up to you whether you believe it or not ( as I'm now "tainted" by some Foo person), but when I was in "Mercury" and doing a refit in Ming-Ming, Anne had to drive home with our then 7 month old son in the middle of winter....got to the S.Sh/N.Sh ferry but things being a bit icy couldn't get up Borough Bank in the Hillman Imp we had then. A bus towed her up. Would that happen now? I doubt it.
Let me know if the refit story rings any bells. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 20, 2010, 07:59:16 PM
If you pedal fast enough - Yes.  %)

Barry M
Barry, quoting from "Perkasaman", he expressed a hope that dear Flora "found her man". Considering that she was the design model for the Tyne Tunnel I think he is being a little naive. I really shudder when I now and again think of my parenthood. Perhaps I could be a new Icon for the UN? Diversity, integration and "multi-culturalism" and so on. Now I'm reaching my allotted "Seven Score and Ten", maybe being cast in bronze (not while living) could serve as a warning (or inspiration) to other idiots who wish to look at miles and miles of water, and observe some of the wonders of nature. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on April 20, 2010, 08:35:06 PM
Mike, up to you whether you believe it or not ( as I'm now "tainted" by some Foo person), but when I was in "Mercury" and doing a refit in Ming-Ming, Anne had to drive home with our then 7 month old son in the middle of winter....got to the S.Sh/N.Sh ferry but things being a bit icy couldn't get up Borough Bank in the Hillman Imp we had then. A bus towed her up. Would that happen now? I doubt it.
Let me know if the refit story rings any bells. Bryan.

Bryan I would still hope it to be in the nature of the average Geordie bus driver to want to offer the same help now (  %) ). As to whether he/she would be so constrained by all the rules and regs as to make it impossible is something else.
I'm sorry there are no ringing of bells about the refit in Ming-Ming, I'm not with you ? If I remember correctly the Mercury was Cable & Wireless and I was never with them.
Regarding the oriental gentleman, I too was puzzled, nay gobsmacked at the apparent implications. Best ignore it, his subsequent silence speaks volumes anyway !


Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 20, 2010, 10:55:40 PM
Bryan I would still hope it to be in the nature of the average Geordie bus driver to want to offer the same help now (  %) ). As to whether he/she would be so constrained by all the rules and regs as to make it impossible is something else.
I'm sorry there are no ringing of bells about the refit in Ming-Ming, I'm not with you ? If I remember correctly the Mercury was Cable & Wireless and I was never with them.
Regarding the oriental gentleman, I too was puzzled, nay gobsmacked at the apparent implications. Best ignore it, his subsequent silence speaks volumes anyway !


Mike

Mike, I'm ashamed for you! The reference was to a C&W refit in 1966/7 in Immingham. I refuse to be drawn on my reactions to Immingham and Grimsby circa 1966....except to say that at least one of them was well named. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on April 20, 2010, 10:56:31 PM
Quote Perhaps I could be a new Icon for the UN? Diversity, integration and "multi-culturalism" and so on. Now I'm reaching my allotted "Seven Score and Ten", maybe being cast in bronze (not while living) could serve as a warning (or inspiration) to other idiots who wish to look at miles and miles of water, and observe some of the wonders of nature. Bryan. Unquote

Bryan,
Perhaps you could have your collected thoughts bound in a little Red Book (all same Chairman Mao), start a fashion for uniform thermal underwear, start swimming the Tyne on your birthday and promote a much overdue Cultural Revolution in Geordieland?  Posteriority would remember you! (Possibly for lunacy and hypothermia and confiming many peoples views of Geordies but you would be remembered....)  %%

Barry M

PS I'm not convinced that Flora has departed by the way; anyday now news of a Second Coming might account for a certain shaking of the ground. . ..
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on April 21, 2010, 09:31:00 AM
Mike, I'm ashamed for you! The reference was to a C&W refit in 1966/7 in Immingham. I refuse to be drawn on my reactions to Immingham and Grimsby circa 1966....except to say that at least one of them was well named. Bryan.

Thanks for that Bryan ! I have just been searching back in the 'Strange but True' thread in an attempt to enlighten my still baffled brain re refitting in Immingham and discovered that for some reason I had missed your early tales from March 2008 when you started the thread to July of the same year when I chipped in concerning the 'Tidreach' Now an hour later (and still not caught up !) I have to abandon absorbing reading in order to get showered and dressed !
Still non the wiser about whatever I am ashamed about, but grateful for being directed back to missed reading ! Many of the other places you mention (besides Ming-Ming that is !) evoke memories of similar visits. I spent six weeks on a tramp ship at Montevideo anchorage discharging coal, where you ran her into the mud at the start and she floated off as she discharged (At least that was what I was told, as a lowly apprentice who only scrubbed the place, matters navigational on the bridge were not for the likes of me !) The bits of Graf Spey were still visible then also, but it was your mention of the smelly mud that triggered the memory. The old brain is still dragging bits as I write, just remembered making friends with a beautiful girl there who's father was a cook on the Graf Spey and had settled in Montevideo, she took us back to meet him and it resulted in an invite to an opera performance ! They wanted to show off their new British Officer friends and asked us to wear uniform. You can imagine that a Cardiff tramp wasn't really into dressing up in such finery and it resulted in a tarpaulin muster back on board to get three of us in something close to M.N uniforms, fortunately they seemed to be happy enough with the result ! A  close inspection would have showed many brushed out mould patches from damp wardrobes ! Remember the light bulbs wired in to the bottom to stop everything turning green !
Enough ! off for a shower !

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Martin [Admin] on October 27, 2010, 07:28:04 AM
Bryan's Northumbrian promoted to a Masterclass by popular request!  :-))
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: cloggie on March 19, 2011, 07:51:02 PM
"Shipwrecked"....nice comments, thank you.
I'll tell you a little story about the show....if your'e interested.
The 2009 show (the first) didn't supply as many tables to TMBC as had been promised, and so all our boats / ships were crammed up sisde by side with really only the bows of the models visible. Not very pleasing to either the entrants or the visiting spectators. On the "assumption" that the same thing would happen again this year many of us at TMBC reduced their entries to allow more space. For myself, I was only going to enter "Northumbrian" as opposed to the 4 or 5 models I generally send to shows. Other club members did the same. So on the friday before the show opened when we took the models it was more than a bit of an eye-opener to discover that we had been allocated a huge stand..so really we could have shown more models without them being crammed up.
In "normal" circumstances the club hires a big van to transport the entered models. For reasons that I won't go into, the van didn't materialise so club members had to transport their own boats in their own cars. This obviously put a bit of a limit as to what could be transported. As I said, I had only entered "Northumbrian", but as "Baroda" was already in the trailer where it lives I dragged that along as well. When I got to the venue I thought how sparse the stand looked...and so Brian (brian_c) sort of coerced me into putting "Baroda" on to the stand. Then (!) he said he was going to enter it into the "competition"...nothing to do with me 'guv. So now the same ship has got 2 "best in show" awards that were totally unexpected. I'm quite sure that if some of our other "ship-builders" had known that our stand was to be so large, there would have been more models shown that are equally as good as "Baroda".
When I went back to collect my boats at the end of the show I was approached by a fellow modeller who was quite adamant that the "Northumbrian" should have all the vehicles and passengers removed as they were not part of "the model". I disagreed. After all, it is a model of a river ferry, and its stock in trade was to transport people and vehicles from one side of the Tyne to the other...so as far as I'm concerned they all remain where they are. Anyway, I don't build models to go "cup-hunting", I just do it to please myself.
The "Northumbrian" very nearly didn't make it to the stand at all. About half a mile from the venue the trailer dropped into a huge pothole...in the rear view car mirror I saw the model lift violently out of its cradle and my heart sank. With good reason. Without going into details a lot of work was needed with the aid of some superglue kindly loaned by a member of another club. (Green jersey, you know who you are, thanks, you were a life-saver!). BY.

Thats fascinating to know Bryan, Apologies for such a long time in replying, but trouble logging on under original name, and as its coming to that time of year for a new show at Temple Park I feel I am able to reply without pregidous now.

Having been coerced into being a judge at the 2010 show (out of the blue), Northumbrian came to my attention, having been a shipbuilder on the Tyne myself and being of local interest she was always going to be of interest.

Looking over all the models on display, she was a fine example of superbly researched model few would attempt.  A credit to her builder without doubt.

Studying her, I can recall the other judges pondering whether she should be best of show,.  I looked below her lines from an unusual angle, simply looking for that one extra feature. Would this modeller add detail to her where no-one would ever look I thought? propelling her to that extra level?.

This was what was going to win her first prize, as opposed to second.  I remember being rebuked by a club member "Why are you looking down there? " I was asked sharply.

I was looking for that extra step which propelled her from brilliant to extra ordinary.  I witnessed a repair. Nevertheless, this just showed to me she'd had an accident or had been injured on a pond, a working model rather than a pristine static, which to me gave her added Kredos.

Barado was there as well, she was vying for first place alongside Northumbrian, along with one other model. 

Now,  can I just say, I don't look at names of modellers -I find it can sway opinions -rather to look at a model and decide on it's features and quality in my view;  Other judges came to the same conclusion as I did, in finding fault with only one aspect of the model.... Namely that one figure out of all the figures on board her, which added life to the model, seemed to be slightly out of scale on the model and hence she dropped 1/2 a point.  Leaving the choice to be between the superb Baroda and the other.  After some discussion, it ended as a unaminous decision that Baroda win with Northumbrian in second place with me adament that Baroda was the worthy winner.

Now don't get me wrong, I am just clarifying the position at the time, as a historical note from my privilaged view point at the time, and hope to see her again this year along with more of your superb builds.

In deep admiration of your building skills,

Regards Bry
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on March 29, 2011, 07:29:08 PM
"Cloggie".....it was only very recently that your post was brought to my attention. I know what you were looking for. The bracing struts between the hull and the overhanging vehicle deck. I did actually debate with myself whether to put them in or not (I've got the drawings for them) but decided against on the grounds of fragility. Although the models bulwarks are much stronger than they look, I always go for the invisible "belt and braces" solution.
I totally agree with you about the guy with the battered old Beetle....but that was just a bit of fun on my part. Winning or losing doesn't make much difference to me, but I was pleased with the general reaction of "viewers" who almost without exception said the model brought back many memories. Mainly from those who live on the North side, and were going home! BY.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: MikeK on March 30, 2011, 07:51:24 AM
And that special rice pudding  %) :-))

Mike
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on March 30, 2011, 09:56:51 AM
Did he get his just desserts?  %)

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: nhp651 on April 01, 2011, 03:49:15 PM
hi Bryan.............just a little snippet of interest to you.
on todays' ( friday 1st april) BBC 2 "Flog it" prog ( you can pick it up on iplayer.)a chap brought in 2 brass fire hydrant nozzles and a builders /engineers plack for one of her engines from Northumbrian, along with a picture of her...made good money too.
neil.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 01, 2011, 07:26:59 PM
Neil. thanks for that. The person who sold it couldn't have had the bits very long as they also featured on the same programme a couple of years ago....unless you were watching a repeat, which wouldn't surprise me! I tried (first time around) to get a screen shot from the telly but it was "unusable". Expletive deleted.....
Not so much interested in the hose nozzles but I'd love a decent photo of the builders plaque. That's just about all that's missing from the model. Cheers. Bryan.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: nhp651 on April 01, 2011, 07:50:14 PM
they have been running best of's on the prog so may well have been a repeat.
the chap metioned that he used to live south side and go over in the car to meet his girl friend who lived north side.....an oldish gent, smartly dressed.
neil.
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: BarryM on April 02, 2011, 09:22:23 AM
Sounds like Bryan - apart from the "smartly" bit  ;D

Barry M
Title: Re: "Northumbrian"
Post by: Bryan Young on April 02, 2011, 04:58:55 PM
Barry, I knew I should have accepted the offer of the Ermine, knee breeches and silver buckled shoes....if only to get up your nose.
But perhaps the "Young" peerage is hereditary and then I'll ensure that a second land clearage act is enacted in your area.
So, alas, until then I will remain a plain and ordinary "Mister" (to you, anyway). BY.