Model Boat Mayhem

The Shipyard ( Dry Dock ): Builds & Questions => Working Vessels => Topic started by: Corposant on October 09, 2008, 07:44:12 pm

Title: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on October 09, 2008, 07:44:12 pm
Is there any way of increasing the dead-band of a servo (Hitec HS-322 HD) that has been modified to produce continuous rotation? It has a tendency to creep and I am concerned that the slightest lateral movement of the tx stick is going to start an unplanned function.

I imagine the continuously rotating Hitec HSR-1425 CR still has the standard 8usec dead-band since it appears to be used in computer controlled robots.

I should point out that I am building my first model boat and am new to the forum. Any advice gratefully received.

Mike
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 09, 2008, 08:25:53 pm
I can only suggest looking up the IC datasheet of the servo amplifier.
If the servo had an old NE544 or ZN409http://www.meditronik.com.pl/doc/plus/zn409.pdf (http://www.meditronik.com.pl/doc/plus/zn409.pdf) it would be a piece of cake.
Regards
Sandy Calder
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Weeds on October 09, 2008, 08:33:15 pm
http://www.runryder.com/helicopter/t398911p1/
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 09, 2008, 08:52:22 pm
http://www.servocity.com/html/hsr-1425cr__continuous_rotatio.html (http://www.servocity.com/html/hsr-1425cr__continuous_rotatio.html)
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Corposant on October 09, 2008, 09:36:31 pm

Sandy, Thanks for your initial reply. I peeled the sticker off the chip but can't find any data about it (Hitec's own). The surface mounted components would make any changes a bit tricky!

Weeds, Thanks for the link to the Runryder thread - very interesting.

Sandy, You're obviously more observant than me! The Servocity website was where I found the HSR-1425 CR but hadn't noticed the comment about the increased dead-band! It looks as if that would be the answer - if it can be obtained in the UK. Thank you so much for your help.

Mike
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 09, 2008, 10:04:58 pm
Sandy, You're obviously more observant than me! The Servocity website was where I found the HSR-1425 CR but hadn't noticed the comment about the increased dead-band! It looks as if that would be the answer - if it can be obtained in the UK. Thank you so much for your help.
Cut it out!
Googled HSR-1425 CR and that link was hit #1

I thought that is what you had as I wasn't paying attention.
Post in Black Arts and you might get a response.
Stick the Hitec HS-322 HD board on a document scanner and take a topside photo and upload to photobucket as it might help those who have used them in the mini subs and warship rc conversions.
or wait the 4 days from US or find a UK source.
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: FullLeatherJacket on October 10, 2008, 08:37:01 am
Mike
Can I ask what application you are planning for this beast? There are several ways of controlling the speed and direction of a small geared motor. The CR servo mentioned only rotates at about 40 RPM anyway, which seems too fast to traverse a gun turret or crane and too slow for a main propeller or paddle-wheel drive.
FLJ
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2008, 10:56:14 am

FLJ,
I'm building a Caldercraft "Northlight" and the aim is to make the derrick functional. I have re-made bits of the winch in brass and mounted a motor under it. The idea is to pass the thread for the main hoist and that for raising and lowering the boom once round the main winding drum and one of the warping drums respectively before passing through the deck to servo driven drums below - hence the need for continuously rotating servos. These would appear to have the advantage of a combined ESC and built in motor thus (hopefully) making them a cheaper option.

Mike
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Martin [Admin] on October 10, 2008, 11:21:45 am

Hi Mike,
 I WAS going to attempt that for Jan's Puffer but found the the boom and hook weren't heavy enough to
 lower themselves back down, how do you plan to overcome this?
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2008, 12:22:44 pm

Martin,

I am anticipating problems! My thoughts so far are to make the pivot points very free moving, using thin thread (therefore more flexible) and possibly inserting a piece of lead in the end of the boom. The project is probably a bit ambitious for a first build. I will post a progress report in due time (but I am very slow!).

May I say how much I enjoyed your series on building Jan's puffer; it was really useful.

Having only just purchased the radio control set, my attention is currently focussed on the steering gear. Yes, I have remade the pulleys and bought a bit of silver chain!

Mike
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: malcolmfrary on October 10, 2008, 12:52:42 pm
For this particular job, the deadband can be increased by changing components as detailed in the links previously given, or
1/  Intercept the wiring to the motor.  Connect a pair of sub-min relays and diodes so that the relays are operated by the electronics board output, one for forward, the other for back, the contacts working the motor.
2/  Remove the servo electronics altogether and replace with one of Action's micro controllers.
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: FullLeatherJacket on October 10, 2008, 01:26:24 pm
Mike
Do you really need to control the actual speed of rotation by radio as well as the direction? If not, you could adopt a simpler set-up with a small geared motor (of which there are numerous on the market for pennies) which is run via a bi-directional switch. See this link:

http://www.action-electronics.co.uk/pdfs/Limit%20Switches.pdf - the top diagram refers. No dead-band problems here - and that's guaranteed.

You simply hold the stick over until the desired position is reached then let go and the motor stops. The limit switches prevent over-running at the end points.
If you need to adjust the speed of the motor then our buddy PMK published a simple PWM device on the Forum a while back which works a treat. You just tweak the pot to adjust the speed. I've built a couple for customers who report it does the bizz, and I have a couple of spares kicking around for anyone who wants to try one.

Suit yourself.

FLJ
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 10, 2008, 02:47:03 pm

http://www.action-electronics.co.uk/pdfs/Limit%20Switches.pdf - the top diagram refers. No dead-band problems here - and that's guaranteed.
FLJ. Who did that lovelerly diagram of the P44 and limit switches?
Did you promise a free P45 for it?

Regards
Sandy
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2008, 03:01:45 pm

Malcolm,
Many thanks for your very practical suggestions. The second looks the easier to achieve (see my reply to FLJ!).

FLJ,
No, there will be no need for speed control. Your P44 looks just the job! It would also make it easier to run the winch motor in parallel. As I am heading into un-charted waters (I have no pond-side experience!), there remains in my mind the problem of starting a function inadvertently. Does the P44 have a "reasonable" dead-band?

Mike
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 10, 2008, 03:45:54 pm
This diagram might be a better guide if you use that switcher.
(http://i371.photobucket.com/albums/oo158/sandy_calder/th_SWITCHER-1.gif) (http://i371.photobucket.com/albums/oo158/sandy_calder/SWITCHER-1.gif)
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: FullLeatherJacket on October 10, 2008, 04:33:31 pm
FLJ. Who did that lovelerly diagram of the P44 and limit switches?
Did you promise a free P45 for it?

Regards
Sandy

That'd be me. Got my P45 from HMRC two years ago and only then found out what "hard work" really means! Thanks for the addendum relating to two motors, BTW.

Mike
Ref P44 deadband - the switch triggers the relays at about 40% full deflection each side of neutral i.e. about 1.3ms and 1.7ms.You WILL need a proper proportional channel; one of the auxiliary ones which has a simple two-way (ON/OFF) toggle switch won't do the job. Ring me if you need any further info - phone number is on the website.
FLJ
Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Sandy Calder on October 10, 2008, 04:49:28 pm
In case of confusion, M1 and M2 in my diagram just refers to the brushes of the single motor.

The diagram in the present pdf link will work but the 1N4003 conduct the motor current.


Title: Re: Modified servo
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2008, 05:30:56 pm

Sandy,
Thanks for the extra diagram.

FLJ,
"Perfick". The radio set has 5 proportional channels. We're off to Cornwall for a few days on Monday. I will give you a ring when we get back.
Regards,
            Mike
Title: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 06, 2009, 07:33:51 pm
Last October (last October!!!!!!!!!!!!), when I said I planned to make the derrick functional on the Caldercraft puffer I'm building, Martin said he had hoped to do the same for Jan's "Highlander". He asked me how I planned to do it.

Herewith a progress report (if it can be called progress after all this time!).

There have been many periods of doing other things and several of giving up!

Step one was to make a mock-up to check feasibility - prior to purchasing FLJ's P44 devices to overcome the servo dead-band problem. I then spent an inordinant amount of time making the pulley blocks:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01065.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01064.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01095.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01167.jpg)

I naively thought that maintaining gentle tension on the lines for lateral boom movement would be simple! The current, elasticated, solution seems extemely crude - but how do you maintain even tension over a relatively long range of thread movement?

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_08_06_14_01257.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01257.mp4)

The final problem is finding suitable thread. So far, I have tried five. The ones that look best are not flexible enough to run freely through the blocks. The thin ones are too hairy.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01231.jpg)

There is great danger of a tangle occurring, out of sight, below deck. The winch will be a bit fiddly to remove.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_08_06_14_01251.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01251.mp4)

The weight hanging on the boom is 4.5g so a slug of lead, weighing about 10g, inserted in the end, should ensure reliable operation.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01238.jpg)

I have completely given up trying to maintain tension on the secondary single line - it will just have to flap around in the breeze! (How was this used in real life?)

The project looks feasible - but only just!

Martin made the right decision!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Dave Buckingham on October 06, 2009, 09:36:44 pm
Hi Mike
I expect the Topping Lift was used to raize the Derrick then the single line was fixed to a cleat as a back up or depending on the method also used while fixing the topping lift.

Dave
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 06, 2009, 09:59:03 pm
Thanks Dave - that would seem logical. The difference in ratio makes it a bit of a problem for modelmakers though!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Martin [Admin] on October 06, 2009, 11:05:53 pm

  At one stage I contemplated using a solid steel boom to keep a tension on the lines.....

    LOVE your winch! http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01014.flv (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01014.flv)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: tigertiger on October 07, 2009, 02:25:13 am
If the bottom line is mostly cosmetic, you could consider using some of that hatters elastic thread. It could still run, if following not pulling, and maintian a tiny bit of tension without causing a lot of friction.

I don't know if it would work, but it is an idea.
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Roger in France on October 07, 2009, 07:20:58 am
One solution to "hairy string" is to run it backwards and forwards several times over a block of beeswax.

Roger in France
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 07, 2009, 08:30:06 am

  At one stage I contemplated using a solid steel boom to keep a tension on the lines.....

    LOVE your winch! http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01014.flv (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01014.flv)


Oh why did you post that Martin. ill have to pull my winch apart to see if I can do anything to make mine look half as good. that's magic very nice

peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 10:37:28 am
Martin

Thanks for your comment - I hadn't realized that Photobucket displays more than the selected video!

I'm surprized that you thought you would need a boom that heavy! Did you get anywhere with lateral movement?

Regards,
            Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 10:47:36 am
Tigertiger

Many thanks for your thought - but I did try using a long length of thin elastic below deck (like my lateral movement tensioning arrangement) but it was still too strong to allow the boom to decsend without the double-block thread kinking. (See Martin's thought about using solid steel for the boom!)

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Bunkerbarge on October 07, 2009, 10:50:41 am
Gents, just a big word of warning here.  If you incorporate a working derrick in your model and use any form of weight to tension the boom when you operate the lift the effective weight will be instantly transferred from the point of which it is at rest on the model to the end of the derrick.  If the derrick is elevated this could have an immediate and disastrous effect on stability and the model could turn over.

This has even happened in real life so make sure that you do plenty of stability experiments in the bath long before you commit to putting this model on the lake and lifting the derrick!!
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: derekwarner on October 07, 2009, 10:57:40 am
Corposant....you could consider resting the end of the boom in a crouch

The attached rough sketch should suffice... essentially...the 1/4" OD solid brass boom locks down to a crouch made from 1/4" OD ....K&S brass metal tube ....but with a 200 degree mouth.........& so it acts as a spring loaded holding device ....Derek :-))
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 11:00:43 am
Roger

Beeswax sounds just the job - provided it doesn't cause the thread to become sticky. I'll certainly be giving it a try! I've tried spraying it with "dry-film" PTFE without success. I had wondered if it would be possible to "flame" it but realized that, at the speed I move at, I'd have no chance - the whole lot would go up in smoke!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Bunkerbarge on October 07, 2009, 11:02:10 am
Just to illustrate the effect check this out:

http://www.albanyaerialphotos.com/stellamare.htm
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: tigertiger on October 07, 2009, 11:05:33 am
Again, thinking out of the box.

You say the line will not run through the pulleys.
Have tried using Dynema, or even Dacron cord.

Both smooth and used in sailing. Very flexible, and Dyneema is smaller diameter (for a given strength) and slippery.
Both come in white, but dacron stains easily with boot polish, I imagine wood dye as well. I have not tried to dye Dynemma.

As for the elastic being too strong.
What if only a short section below deck was elasticated. This would reduce the pull.
Or you could try what the sailing boys do to maintain tension on winch drums. Where a ring on a piece of elastic is used to pull on the line and maintain tension.
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 07, 2009, 11:19:38 am
can you put an extra loop in and use a pully block wirh a very light spring to tension.

peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 11:36:38 am
Bunkerbarge

Thanks for the warning - and the illustration! I am hoping that 10g in the end of the boom won't cause much of a problem - lifting a load will be a different matter!

According to SWMBO, it won't be a problem for me as I'm not going to live long enough to finish the model!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 11:42:43 am
Derek

Thanks for your suggestion. The model comes with a white metal cradle for the boom, which sits on the edge of the deckhouse. I'm not sure I quite follow you on the "spring loaded" bit.

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 11:59:41 am
Tigertiger

Your box is obviously a source of really useful thoughts! I was hoping someone would suggest something better than "Mercerised" cotton - "Dynema" or "Dacron" would appear to be just what I'm looking for.

Your thought about tensioning has made me realize I went off on the wrong track with my arrangement, so many thanks for that - a major re-think on the way!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 07, 2009, 12:00:54 pm
it was for the secondry line   very rough sketch

peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 12:11:01 pm
Peter

Your suggestion (like that of Tigertiger) has shown me the benefit of posting ones faltering attempts on this forum! The puffer is my first build, so I'm on a steep learning curve. I should have paid more attention to the sailing fraternity!

Many thanks,
                  Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Martin [Admin] on October 07, 2009, 12:30:38 pm
Topic name changed....  :-)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 01:57:29 pm
Peter

Re: your "secondary line" drawing. If the boom is lowered from nearly vertical, almost 30cm of the secondary line has to be "lost" below deck. I found it impossible to maintain a gentle enough tension on the thread within the available space. Thanks for your deliberation!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 02:10:59 pm
Tigertiger

I've been exercising my limited number of little grey cells and my memory has clicked in. I did, in fact, start along the lines of your sail winch principle. My assumption was that the loop of thread for the lateral movement lines would be almost constant in length - which would have meant that your idea would work. This held true until I started to raise the boom! The loop then varies in length by a lot - hence the ungainly arrangement below deck.

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 07, 2009, 02:21:30 pm
you could do this and even use another spring on the single pully they only have to be very very light or elastic.

Peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: tigertiger on October 07, 2009, 02:41:37 pm
I believe Dyneema (aka Spectra) is used for fishing line. So you should be able to get some very small diameters.
I know that 30kg Dyneema is about 0.5mm diameter. This may be a bit big for you.

But I have googled spectra down to about 10lbs BS and 0.02"
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 02:59:07 pm
Peter

I'll give it a whirl! Thanks for not giving up on me!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 07, 2009, 03:01:27 pm
Tigertiger

Thanks for the info - I'll have scout around.

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Ron1 on October 07, 2009, 11:12:09 pm
Heres the mast and working winch on my son,s Moonlight,
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 08, 2009, 10:34:36 am
Ron

What a brilliant model - something for me to aim at! In my (very feeble!) defence, I am working at 1:32 scale rather than 1:24 and raising and lowering the boom.

If anyone wants to see how to do the job properly, have a look at www.north-cheshire-marine.org.uk/mn.htm

Many thanks for that,
                              Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2009, 06:06:33 pm
Peter (HS93)

It works! O me of little faith! Many thanks for your wisdom (and Tigertiger's "box").

As can be seen from the pictures and video, the experiment was very much a "lash up".

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01265.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_08_06_14_01287.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01287.mp4)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01284.jpg)

The weight on the boom weighed 9g.

By the way, is this picture any help?!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01002.jpg)

The plastic gears were a fortuitous find in Maplins (who no stock them - but they can be obtained from Como Drills www.mfacomodrills.com - who also supplied the motor).

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 10, 2009, 08:35:39 pm
glad t worked , if you make a double block two sheaves( think thats what they are called ) it may make it a bit smaller and simpler.

Peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 10, 2009, 10:50:03 pm
if you did it this way with a double version of your blocks.

peter
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 10, 2009, 11:40:05 pm
Peter

Thanks for the pretty picture! Yes that's what I had in mind. The blocks used in the experiment have 0.5mm stainless steel spindles to ensure the sheaves spin freely (and are reserved for use above deck where it shows!). The ones I bought for use below deck have thick brass spindles, so probably wouldn't work as well. Making a small frame is no problem but if I can't find any sheaves on the market with small enough holes, it'll be back to the lathe for another very fiddly session!

Crumbs, look at the time - I'm missing my beauty sleep!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on October 10, 2009, 11:59:16 pm

these are the ones I used on my woking boat derecks, you have to get the right cord to make them work smooth. miskin models do some 0.6mm rope.

Peter


http://www.model-steam-boats.co.uk/boat_fittings/boat_fittings.htm
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: tigertiger on October 11, 2009, 02:49:12 am
Excellent result. Neat and simple.

From the video it sound like you are eating a butty at the time of testing as well. {-)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 09:10:59 am
Peter

Once again, many thanks for your help and information. I only started this thread - very much togue in cheek - in response to Martin's challenge last year but the advice I have received has been invaluable!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 09:20:00 am
Tigertiger

Neat is the last word I would use for it! - but not bad for an ex hospital biochemist!

As for the video: I was working on the dining room table at the time! - SWMBO is very tolerant!

[Just to set the record straight - it was my hand brushing against the masking tape holding the deckhouse in place - if you can believe that!]

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Ron1 on October 11, 2009, 10:37:32 am
Now the next job is to get the wheel to lift up and down and get the bom to turn L & R, like anthony,  ;) ;) %)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 01:38:46 pm
Ron

I have actually had the hoist working. The second spool under the winch is for that. Until I get FLJ's P44 units, the small dead-band of the servo's is a real pain.

Yes I need to get the boom moving! My plan is the same as Anthony's - running a long pivot down below deck. That's going to have to wait until I mount it all in the hull.

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: catengineman on October 11, 2009, 04:03:51 pm
Could you take the second line below deck and run it to a drum on the end of your lifting winch, but have it driven through a slip clutch idea that way a constant tension could be applied, it would need to be directional and the drum would need a drag brake.

R,
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 04:46:57 pm
Catengineman

Good thinking - but there is a snag! The presence of the winding drums beneath the winch makes the whole unit difficult to jiggle in and out. I think more mechanism would add to this problem - although I'm hoping not to have to remove it too often! I'll give your ideas some thought - need to keep things simple to match my mind!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: catengineman on October 11, 2009, 06:07:42 pm
I know what you are saying regarding removal re fitting  :(( I made my Tito Neri anchor winch operational and the first unit gave some problems so I had to rethink that caused some removal / fitting mod's to be carried out but now it works I am happy to leave it where it is, unlike you where you have made a model to test it out I put mine in the model first so now I will use your idea if I ever do things like that again.

Is it possible to put your winch in a more accessible place then reeve the lines to that position via small pulley blocks or the likes of brake cable tubes to guide the line to where you require it.

R,
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 06:37:26 pm
Catengineman

When I started, my thought was to use modified servos (i.e. continuously rotating) to operate the winding drums, so I made a frame to mount them under the winch. Because of their very small deadband, they are not going to be useable, so the plan is leave them in place and just use their motors, driven by FLJ's P44 units. If I were starting again, I would certainly adopt your idea. I'll give it some thought, but having got it just about working, it would take a lot to make me change tack!! However, for the next model ..............!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: catengineman on October 11, 2009, 06:49:26 pm
I am having some problems getting the right operation for three dredge gantry winches but two have to do more than just up and down on a line. still it's the fun part of modeling which I find so addictive.
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 11, 2009, 11:08:47 pm
Addictive is the word!!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 12, 2009, 04:21:56 pm
Ron

Just to prove I can do it!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_08_06_14_01293.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=08_06_14_01293.mp4)

Still a long way short of Anthony's scratch built winch with a fully functional cable drum! (I'm planning to cheat by glueing a length of thread round mine!)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01290.jpg)

The relay is not very happy at present - it doesn't like the PWM signal feeding the servo motors!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Martin [Admin] on October 12, 2009, 04:44:44 pm

Very impressive Mr. Bond!  :-))
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Ron1 on October 12, 2009, 06:42:13 pm
Mike, Its looking good, and your getting there, Anthony,s was built 23 years ago , he was 18 when he started the project. ;) ;)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 12, 2009, 07:19:21 pm
Ron

I've left it a bit late to get up to his standard - threescore years and ten next year!!

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Ron1 on October 12, 2009, 11:17:15 pm
Im still trying, im 71 in dec this year. ;) ;)
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on October 13, 2009, 09:40:54 am
So you're into creaking joints and lost without your watchmaker's loupe too!!

Mike
Title: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Bugsy on November 20, 2009, 07:31:42 pm
its still bl**dy annoying.

Fitting some carbon fibre rudder control rods today. Fitted the rudder ends (push-pull system), measured and marked the rods with masking tape, removed them from the boat and 'dremelled' the ends off only to find that I'd cut the wrong side of the masking tape. They are now 3/4" too short.  {:-{  <:(

Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: omra85 on November 20, 2009, 07:35:14 pm
Look on the bright side - at least you didn't use 2" masking tape  {-) {-) {-)

Just cut 3/4" out of the boat  :-)) %%

Danny
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: barryfoote on November 20, 2009, 09:04:58 pm
Bugsy,

I think that kind of thing has happened to us all.....without exception..
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Peter Fitness on November 20, 2009, 09:40:20 pm
What's the old saying?? "Measure twice, cut once"  O0 But you only did cut once, but in the wrong place  :o As Footski said, we've all done it.

Peter.
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Damien on November 20, 2009, 11:02:53 pm
Bugsy   Mrs Damien says you should get on your knees and thank God your not a Surgeon.
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: gondolier88 on November 20, 2009, 11:09:02 pm
Or you could be real boat boatbuilder...
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: andyn on November 21, 2009, 01:06:05 am
Every Rover ST1 ever made was slightly longer one one side that the other, we've all done it ;)

Just earlier tonight after making some toast I had phone in one hand and butter knife in the other, guess which one I threw in the sink? Luckily no water in it  {-)
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Bugsy on November 21, 2009, 07:34:55 am
Great comments  :-))

Note to self: put an arrow mark on the edge to be cut. :-)
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Roger in France on November 21, 2009, 07:44:37 am
I know the feeling well !

I now practise:
   
    Measure twice, cut once.
    Mark where to cut.
    Forget what the mark means.
    Start again.
    Get it wrong.
    Take the pills.
     Go and take a nap.

Roger in France

Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: omra85 on November 21, 2009, 09:07:04 am
So, Bugsy in Vienne and Roger in La Vendee (surrounded by good, cheap wine), Andy swimming in Strongbow -
I think I can see a pattern emerging  O0 {-) {-)

How about "all cutting to be done between 12md and 3pm" which would coincide with the end of the DT's but before the start of the afternoon session  %) %)

CHEERS
Danny
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Bugsy on November 21, 2009, 09:31:42 am
I can 'hic' assure you Danny 'hic', that the wine 'hic' has nothing to do with it. 'hic'.
 %) %)
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: andyn on November 21, 2009, 01:55:53 pm
Yesterday I was at the nice 12 year old scotch that someone bought me  ;)
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Corposant on November 22, 2009, 09:10:13 pm
Bugsy

At least the solution to your problem was "clear cut"!

For several weeks (on & off), I have been making some pulleys for mounting below deck.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01310.jpg)

Having just completed them, I realised the ones with a mounting bracket were u/s because the bracket was going to foul the thread on it's way round the sheave. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similarilar).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01313.jpg)

One would have thought that the guy in the drawing office would have spotted that - but his "senior moments" seem to be coalescing these days.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/drwingoff0001.jpg)

Solution: Make new mounting brackets using thinner brass and reduce the thread on the blocks from 4BA to 6BA. So...

Mounted one of the blocks in the lathe to skim off the threaded section...but not enough material in the chuck for good grip, so tool tears it out and chews it up. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01319.jpg)

Plan B: Start afresh with new rod. On cutting 6BA thread, find it's chewed up. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar). Turn down a bit more rod and try again - with the same result. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar). Close inspection of the die (c. 50 yrs old), reveals the reason - needs binning. Success with fresh die.

First attempt at milling the slot results in the work coming loose and the cutter destroying it. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01328.jpg)

(I don't have a milling machine, so it's a bit hit and miss with the pillar drill.)

Make yet another block - O.K. this time round.

On making the new mounting brackets, I had to destroy the first one to retrieve the tap as the solder had caused it to jam. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01332.jpg)

Eventually, however:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01324.jpg)

Just goes to show what can happen when a biochemist tries his hand at engineering!

Mike
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Bugsy on November 22, 2009, 09:12:29 pm
Brilliant !!
Title: Re: I don't suppose I'm the first but .....................
Post by: Corposant on November 22, 2009, 09:40:33 pm
I thought that might cheer you up!

Mike
Title: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 07:03:01 pm
What could be simpler?

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00780.jpg)

Two strips of brass, 2mm thick. Drill ten holes..........

First attempt abandoned when 0.5mm Tungsten Carbide drill shattered, leaving it's remnants firmly embedded. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

Second attempt resulted in the drill shattering in the tenth hole. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar). This time I spent the afternoon and the following morning attempting to remove the fragments as I had no more 0.5mm drills with a sturdy shank. Although successful, nasty things happened to the first of the HSS micro drills I used to enlarge the hole to 0.65mm, because of remnants of Tungsten Carbide were still in the wall. Thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

So...

Question: How do you drill small holes?

I used a pillar drill, white spirit as lubricant and was very gentle (or so I thought). Ordinary HSS micro drills are too "whippy" to keep the hole vertical (and too small to fit in the chuck).

Is there a better (i.e. tougher) alternative to Tungsten Carbide? Obviously cost is a factor but one wouldn't mind paying a bit extra for something more user friendly.

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: stallspeed on December 09, 2009, 07:47:04 pm
Have you tried titanium coated steel bits?
I got over the flex of small diameter bits on a dc powered drill by using a controller that monitors the drill motor current drain.The chuck
idles until pressure is applied at which the controller steps up the voltage to full.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Liverbudgie on December 09, 2009, 07:56:38 pm
1) Tungsten carbide drills are very hard and brittle therefore shatter easily and are not the best for this job as you have found out.

2) I take it that you do "pop" mark your holes before drilling so that the drill does not skate across the material when it first touches it.

3) If you your chuck won't take the very small sizes A) Buy a chuck that will or B) buy a GOOD quality set of pin vices which will take your small HSS drills and insert pin vice into your present chuck.

4) Don't use so much pressure let the drill do the work, if you have to use pressure then this means that the drill is blunt and needs sharpening or replacing.

5) Use a light machine oil to lubricate if you need to.

LB
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 08:18:13 pm
Stallspeed

I've got a few Titanium coated drills but none with reinforced shanks - I'll have a look on the Internet (and at the Model Engineers exhibition). Your drilling machine sounds fascinating!

Regards,
            Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 08:33:07 pm
Liverbudgie

Many thanks for your thoughts. Yes, I mark small holes by "twizzling" a needle in a pin vice. My problem is not starting but finishing! The breakage occurs when the hole is quite deep, so it must be a problem with clearing swarf - even though I keep withdrawing the drill. I have never had a problem when drilling small holes using the lathe.

I have tried mounting a pin vice in the chuck, without success. The "Eclipse" one appears to be a reasonable quality - but perhaps you can recommend a better make.

Regards,
            Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: stallspeed on December 09, 2009, 08:44:51 pm
I've managed to break a 2.5mm of those tungsten bits so the only use for them is drilling plastic sheet and printed circuit boards.
You get the titanium bits in kits along with the wood bits,masonry drills from the usual suppliers of 100 bits for £10.....Aldi,Lidl,Makro

The drill speed control was only a circuit idea from Elektor Electronics.It works on the same principle as an SLA battery charger where the voltage steps down to the float level when the current drain falls.

I have not used the drill controller since I got a pillar stand for a variable speed B&D drill.All it needs is a drill with decent torque and proper chuck that you can run at low speed or doesn't leave 2" of twist drill flapping about at 5,000 rpm.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 09:17:05 pm
Stallspeed

Thanks for your advice. Elektor Magazine - that's a blast from the past! - I had no idea it still existed. I used to subscribe to it about 30 years ago! It was always very interesting.

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: dodgy geezer on December 09, 2009, 09:52:37 pm
I cheat.

I use dentist's burrs. My Dentist throws them out (to me :-)) after very few uses - they are very small and the shafts are very strong. I use them for pilot holes if I'm drilling anything small.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: stallspeed on December 09, 2009, 10:03:31 pm
Stallspeed

Thanks for your advice. Elektor Magazine - that's a blast from the past! - I had no idea it still existed. I used to subscribe to it about 30 years ago! It was always very interesting.

Mike
There was a pcb pattern with it too.
I think it was in the bumper summer issue of the mid 80s.Although I'm a sad git hoarder,I keep them out in the loft. :embarrassed:
The magazine is still going strong and is available in cd format.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: gondolier88 on December 09, 2009, 10:10:10 pm
Centre drill then enlarge with the finishing bit, or if you find you are drilling holes in brass often of the same diameter invest in two or three reamers to finish off.

However addressing the original problem- drill bits shouldn't break if they are used under the right conditions- make sure the work isn't moveing, make sure the drill bit is drilling centrally- your centreing method isn't the best for drilling brass- you should mark the metal, centre pop with a centre punch the use a centre drill and expand with a reamer or drill bit.

Also, use fast spindle speeds, very slow feed rate and lubricate with something better than white spirit- brass creates a lot of friction when it's machined, and white spirit being petroleum based will evaporate at the point of contact as opposed to lubricating it- try proper cutting fluid, or try 3in1.

Greg
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on December 09, 2009, 10:25:44 pm
I do a lot of bras drilling (look at some of my postings) and have found a lot depends on the brass, I tend to use softer brasses the type sold to watch makers and have found it machines great another source is the likes of K&S from model shops, I use the tin coated drills from
 http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue/Cutting-Tools/Twist-Drills/Drill-Bits---TiN-Coated     
for the last few years and have had good results.

peter
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: stallspeed on December 09, 2009, 10:29:54 pm
- drill bits shouldn't break if they are used under the right conditions-
Mike's drill bits are probably ex-equipment 1/8" shank solid tungsten bits from circuit board fabricators.They are very brittle.I broke a 2.5 mm one drilling plywood.

I don't see any sign of JB Cutting tools any more.Does anyone still sell these tungsten bits for sale at shows?
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 10:58:04 pm
Dodgygeezer

Dentist's burrs sound great - but do they go down to 0.5mm? That reminds me, it's about time I found a dentist (last visit 1989!!).

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 11:00:41 pm
Stallspeed

Thanks for the info about the mag. - I've had a look at their website.

Yes my drills have 1/8" shanks - bought from Horley Drill Service (free postage!).

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 11:06:10 pm
Greg

Thanks for your tips. Centre drill - no problem, I've got a small one but the breakage comes later! I think your advice about lubrication may be the answer. I chose white spirit because it works well with aluminium. I haven't got any cutting fluid but plenty of 3 in 1!

The mind boggles at using a centre punch for starting a 0.5mm hole! I'll stick with the centre drill!

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 09, 2009, 11:10:06 pm
Peter

Good to hear from you again - and thanks for the info. I had a quick look at the arceurotrade website but couldn't see any at 0.5mm. I'm hopeful of the Model Engineer's exhibition - and also hoping for more boats than last time!

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: gondolier88 on December 09, 2009, 11:13:30 pm
Centre punching small diameter holes- you need a brand new punch- very acute angle and save it for non ferrous to save the tip.

Using a brand new stanley knife scribe the centre lines you wish to use, then hold the work to the light, the brighter the better, and PUSH the punch into the centre- this will suffice for 0.5mm-1.5mm- it does for me anyway :-))

Greg
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: dodgy geezer on December 10, 2009, 01:40:37 am
Dodgygeezer

Dentist's burrs sound great - but do they go down to 0.5mm?

Mike

Smallest tip I have is .003 inch tip (0.07 mm), and a couple of .008 inch (0.23 mm). At 0.5mm I have quite a selection, including ball end and inverted cone. So in theory (if I could see or hold to that precision) I could drill a 0.5mm hole and undercut it inside to 0.25mm. Ask your dentist about them....


Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Bunkerbarge on December 10, 2009, 08:17:34 am
I use standard HSS drills and hold small ones in a pin vice.  I haven't seen a mention yet of my own technique, which is to hold the majority of the length of the drill in the chuck, thereby not allowing the drill to flex as much.  To start off such a hole I would only have a few millimeters of the drill outside the chuck and then might extend it a couple of times during the process to keep the free length as short as possible.  This allows the use of HSS drills and therefore reduces the likelyhood of a tungsten carbide bit shattering.

Obviously lubrication and very regular clearing of the swarf play thier part but I don't normally bother with lubrication on such a cut but do very regularly remove the drill to clear the swarf and cool the drill.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: stallspeed on December 10, 2009, 08:44:53 am
You call it a technique,Bunkerbarge.I call it common sense.
All it needs is a drill with decent torque and proper chuck that you can run at low speed or doesn't leave 2" of twist drill flapping about at 5,000 rpm.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: derekwarner on December 10, 2009, 08:45:51 am
I must agree here

1) accurate center punch marking  is required
2) accurate stability of the work piece is a must
3) the suggestion by 'bunkerbarge' ....which is to hold the majority of the length of the drill in the chuck, thereby not allowing the drill to flex as much is naturally the preferred option

A ........45:1 ratio of effective drilling depth to diameter is totally achievable with care............. :-)) ....Derek
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 10, 2009, 09:34:45 am
Greg

Thanks again - yes, I use a Swann Morton blade to score the centre line. I'll have a scout round for a suitable centre punch.

Dodgy Geezer

0.003" Wow! - I really must find a dentist!

Bunkerbarge

I've always been reluctant to grip the fluted part of a drill in the chuck - but I see the logic of it. For the current problem (now over!), the chuck of my pillar drill is too chunky - so I'll have to try and find a pin vice that spins true.

Derek

Thanks for your confirmatory input.

Many thanks to you all - I'm most grateful

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: tigertiger on December 10, 2009, 12:14:21 pm
I cannot remember what I saw or where, but this problem rings a bell.

Perhaps what I write will ring another bell with someone else.

I think for brass you need to chamfer the cutting edge of the drill bit. Otherwise it digs in and bites, maybe why they snap. By taking of the sharpest part of the cutting edge, this is avoided.

Like I say I can't remember what exactly I read, but I am pretty sure it was about drilling brass.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: wideawake on December 10, 2009, 12:47:39 pm
I cannot remember what I saw or where, but this problem rings a bell.

Perhaps what I write will ring another bell with someone else.

I think for brass you need to chamfer the cutting edge of the drill bit. Otherwise it digs in and bites, maybe why they snap. By taking of the sharpest part of the cutting edge, this is avoided.

Like I say I can't remember what exactly I read, but I am pretty sure it was about drilling brass.

Yes TT you're right.   It seems to be standard advice in Model Engineering books to do as you suggest when drilling brass or gunmetal.   Unchamfered, the drill has a tendency to snatch as it breaks through and break under the twisting force.   I also believe (but may be wrong) that when a wider range of kit was available than now, slow spiral drills were preferred for brass.   i have read of serious model engineers who keep a separate set of most-used sizes (tapping drills etc) modified for brass drilling.
If the drill is breaking earlier in the hole then too much pressure and/or not withdrawing often enough would seem to be the most likely cause.

In terms of cutting fluid it's possible to get small bottles of purpose designed oil quite cheaply.

HTH

Guy
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on December 10, 2009, 01:00:37 pm
I have just rember'd drilling some hard brass recently and found that dormer drills where the only ones that would touch it, the cheap ones where just skidding and getting hot, the brass was B+Q best wont buy that again no wonder it is so cheap.

peter
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: wideawake on December 10, 2009, 01:22:09 pm
I have just rember'd drilling some hard brass recently and found that dormer drills where the only ones that would touch it, the cheap ones where just skidding and getting hot, the brass was B+Q best wont buy that again no wonder it is so cheap.

peter

Yes Peter I think someone highlighted the problems with "brass" further down the thread or somewhere else.  Unless purchased from a reputable metal supplier and with a designation then what you get is fairly unpredictable in it's machining qualities.   Not knocking B&Q, I've used their stock myself at times for odd jobs.

The other thing your experience highlights is the desirability of using a rigid spotting drill or centre drill to form a dimple in which to start the normal twist drill.   Even the smallest size centring drill is far more rigid than a twist drill!

HTH

Guy
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on December 10, 2009, 01:42:55 pm
Yes Peter I think someone highlighted the problems with "brass" further down the thread or somewhere else.  Unless purchased from a reputable metal supplier and with a designation then what you get is fairly unpredictable in it's machining qualities.   Not knocking B&Q, I've used their stock myself at times for odd jobs.

The other thing your experience highlights is the desirability of using a rigid spotting drill or centre drill to form a dimple in which to start the normal twist drill.   Even the smallest size centring drill is far more rigid than a twist drill!

HTH

Guy

Yes it was me

Peter
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: wideawake on December 10, 2009, 01:50:37 pm
Yes it was me

Peter

OOPS!   Morgan - Rearrange the following, "Suck teaching eggs grandmother your to" and write out 100 times   :-)

Guy
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 10, 2009, 01:58:52 pm
Tigertiger, Guy, Peter

I know that brass comes in various hardnesses but, in my ignorance, I thought that it was the "bees knees" in terms of "workability". Your comments are very interesting - and helpful. I'm sure a major factor in the problem is using a pillar drill fitted with a 1/2" chuck. Whenever I use it, I think that a micrometer feed would be nice! - and that is why I don't have the problem using the lathe, because the feed can be done very delicately.

Thanks again,
                   Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: tigertiger on December 10, 2009, 02:09:41 pm
Hi Mike

It is very workable, or so they told us in school.
Just a matter of having the right tools.  {-) {-)
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 10, 2009, 02:14:55 pm
And a bad workman always blames his tools!
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: tigertiger on December 10, 2009, 02:19:02 pm
I seem to remember brass clogging files at school, and warnings about exploding grinding wheels.  {:-{

Trickey stuff, that brass.
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 10, 2009, 02:39:36 pm
Tigertiger

That's certainly true of aluminium but really surprises me with brass - especially exploding grinding wheels! Explosions like that usually result from a collection of fine, combustible particles causing a chain reaction. It used to be a problem in flour mills - and the exposions are very violent! I used to work with a biochemist who had previously worked as a forensic scientist. He told the tale of a chap who went into work alone one Saturday morning to do some machining using magnesium. The fine dust he created ignited. My colleague said all they found of him was his shoes!

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: gondolier88 on December 10, 2009, 05:07:36 pm
Bunkerbarge's advice is sound- i found this out after drilling brass funnily enough- the bit snapped, however the tip was left intact for a length of about 1.5inches- I put this back in the chuck and it worked perfectly.

Greg
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 10, 2009, 06:52:22 pm
Greg

Bunkerbarge's advice is always sound! (especially good at pointing out pitfalls.) I'm very glad I posted my shortcomings, it's been very educational!

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: tigertiger on December 11, 2009, 12:43:59 am
I thiink the exploding grinding wheel was not the gaseous like particles (e.g. lead powder), but the fine particle of brass clogging in the grain of the grind stone (possibly a build up over time) and then these particles expanding with the heat caused by friction. The expansion of the brass in the stone of the wheel causes the stone to rupture/shatter, whilst rotating at high speed. So less of a chemical explosion, but certainly high speed debris in all direction.

Well I think that is what our metal work teacher was saying.  I was possibly bored at the time {:-{ , looking forward to another double period of planishing my caddy spoon. :((
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 11, 2009, 08:09:16 am
I'm sure your teacher was right - they usually were! I hope you've still got your beautifully planished caddy spoon!

Mike
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: derekwarner on December 11, 2009, 11:24:27 am
mmmmmm grinding brass?  >>:-(...in lay terms .......we have aluminium oxide wheels for ferrous metals & silicone carbide wheels for tungsten or tipped tools

Were we not taught  :police: :police: :police: , never grind brass on a grinding wheel  %% .......but maybe something newer has been invented............Derek
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: samuel15g on December 11, 2009, 12:45:07 pm
We also have to consider the rake and clearance angles when drilling brass.
Correct Rake and clearance angles are essential when drilling different materials.
Brass, cast iron and perspex will "snatch" if you use drills ground for mild steel. If your works not properly clamped the drill will snatch, grab and break.
With a large drill there's a chance it'll take your fingers out too.

To find the recommended angles search the web to find a myriad of stuff , however , it can take years of grinding experience to do this in a home workshop.

Kind regards
Title: Re: Give me strength!
Post by: Corposant on December 11, 2009, 03:50:45 pm
Samuel

Many thanks for your advice. Sadly, adjusting the rake and clearance of a 0.5mm drill are beyond my capabilities! - and I don't have enough years left to gain "grinding experience in a home workshop"!! I'll certainly have a rummage on the "net".

Mike
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Angusc on December 14, 2009, 03:55:00 pm
Hi

Nothing to do with working Derricks but I have just bought the caldercraft puffer as a first model. Have you any advice you can give me? On opening the box I felt a littlebit overwhelmed.

Thanks

Ancusc
Title: Re: Working Puffer Derrick crane anyone?!?!?
Post by: Corposant on December 14, 2009, 04:59:28 pm
Hi Angusc

Northlight is my first build too! We had a holiday on the Vic32 - brillaint experience - and I bored them all at work about it so much that they gave me the kit as a retirement present! That was over nine years ago! In fairness to myself, because of moving home, renovation etc, I only started building it about two years ago.

Like you, I found the instruction booklet geared to someone with at least some experience. Once you get started though, it's not too bad. Why they start with fitting the rudder is a bit of a mystery! Because the inner surface of the hull is somewhat uneven, I made the bulkheads out of card and made these fit first - like the first stage in making the non-existent stand! These can then be used to shape the wooden ones. Two part epoxy is the adhesive to use here.

Then - big, big problem!!

Looking at the bag of bits for the winch, I thought "Wouldn't it be nice to make this work". If you're planning to complete the model in a reasonable time, shut any such thoughts from your mind! (I also decided to make the steering gear work with the chain, which will require modifying the shape of the wheelhouse.)

So...

My advice to you is ask lots of questions on the forum - the guy's here fall over themselves to help chaps like us. They don't mind if it's been asked before, but they do like lots of pictures!

First question should be about suitable adhesives for the various materials involved. At some stage in the near future, ask about when the fittings should be painted - I haven't got round to that yet, so you can save me the trouble! I've fitted a motor from my accumulated odds and ends and I'm planning to use an ESC which I made up from a Maplin's kit about twenty years ago - this will cause the forum members to throw a wobbly - so you'd better ask them for some proper advice here too!

Quite a number of people on the forum have made this model, so you should get more useful adice shortly.

Regards,
            Mike
Title: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Angusc on December 30, 2009, 04:33:10 pm
I don't much like the white metal propellor that comes with the kit. Can anybody recommend a source of brass propellors?

Thanks

AngusC
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Bradley on December 30, 2009, 04:36:46 pm
Try this one, Angus -

http://www.gsitek-props.co.uk/

Derek.    :police:
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: a3nige on December 30, 2009, 05:04:50 pm
Then paint the white metal one and use it as deck cargo.  :-))
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Bradley on December 31, 2009, 05:13:03 pm
Angus,
What happened to your other postings about the Puffer, did you get any replies?  They seem to have disappeared. {:-{  I was going to suggest that you ask Martin-Admin if they could all be combined into one and you may then have got more replies.  One thing you could do is to put 'Caldercraft Clyde Puffer' or even just 'Puffer' into the search box, top left, and I think you would be surprised at the number of links it will come up with. :-))

Derek.    :police:
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Angusc on December 31, 2009, 09:42:17 pm
Thanks Derek. I wondered myself what had happened to them. I thought perhaps I'd upset somebody. I will take your advice and do a more detailed search. I'm just finding my feet on the forum at the moment.

Angus
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Corposant on December 31, 2009, 10:28:17 pm
There's a couple in the first "Working Boats" section.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Bradley on December 31, 2009, 10:57:26 pm
Quote
I'm just finding my feet on the forum at the moment.

Angus,

On this forum if you're not sure, just ask.  Most mayhemmers could not be more helpful. :-) :-) :-))

Derek.    :police:
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Angusc on January 01, 2010, 06:37:19 pm
Thanks

Angus
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Davew on January 07, 2010, 06:29:27 pm
Hi
I am after a bit of advice just about to start the Caldercraft Clyde Puffer build and I just what size moter to use and ESC to suit.

Thanks DaveW
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Angusc on January 12, 2010, 12:09:43 am
Hi Dave

I'm afraid I haven't got that far yet. I don't seem to have the time at the moment to get started.

Angus
Title: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: Corposant on January 12, 2010, 07:59:04 pm
The good news is that FLJ's P44 units work a treat for operating the Puffer winch motors. The tiny dead-band problem I had with modified servos has been overcome by removing the circuitry and just leaving the motors.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00803.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00803.flv)

Because one may wish to lower the hoist whilst raising the boom, a relay prevents conflicting signals being sent to the motor driving the winch mechanism. (I tried to demonstrate this in the video but it's virtually impossible to spot!)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00784.jpg)

Now the bad news.

After the success of using a weighted pulley system to maintain gentle tension on the secondary (dummy) line for raising the boom (shown, still in prototype form, on the right in the next picture), I made a similar system to replace the crude lengthy pieces of elastic which I was using to maintain tension on the lines used for lateral movement of the boom.

Knowing that a greater length of thread was involved, I increased the number of sheaves from three to five.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00821.jpg)

The video demonstrates the extent of my stupidity!!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00810.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00810.flv)

The two outer sheaves in the upper block don't count, so it's a three sheave system!

I'm now in a quandry. Do I accept that I can't raise the boom quite as far as I had hoped and stick with the rather lengthy, horizontal, piece of elastic to maintain tension (I had hoped to use a spring) or do I start again using an extra pair of sheaves?

The system already has a total of nine!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00831.jpg)

I strongly suspect that, with any extra sheaves, more spring tension will be required to prevent transient slackness in the thread and this could put too much strain on the system when the boom is fully raised. My inexperience is getting the better of me!

Finally, the ugly:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01016.jpg)

Given half a chance, she'll lick you to death!

(Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: Corposant on January 13, 2010, 11:48:00 pm
Dave

It might be better to start a new thread with your question about a motor. Several members of the forum have built this model and could give you advice. I, like Angus, haven't got the right experience but it seems to me that "scale speed" is the key. I have seen a Puffer zooming round a lake like a speedboat and it made me cringe. In my case, I dug a 5 pole motor out of the "might come in handy" box and it seems about right in the bath - but that's a far cry from open water! (5 poles or more are better than 3 for low speed running.)

Most ESC's seem to be rated at 10 Amps going up to 20 or more. My motor, which I'm running off a 6 Volt battery pack, draws 1.4 Amps when connected to 7.5 V and stalled. Even at 9.5 V and stalled, it only draws 1.8 Amps. So you definitely need some advice from someone more experienced in these matters! Talk to FLJ about ESC's.

The Mabuchi website has a lot of information about motors:

http://www.mabuchi-motor.co.jp/en_US/index.html

In particular the Technical guide and Product Information/Web Catalogue/Motor Designations

Finally, I agree with Angus about the prop. and shaft that come with the kit. I have fitted them to mine but now regret it. You can hear the rust crunching when the shaft is turned! It's only been in water a couple of times - and yes, I did stuff plenty of grease in! Go for brass!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: FullLeatherJacket on January 14, 2010, 08:32:00 am
A 12v Mabuchi 555 and a 10A ESC would do nicely.
PM me for details if you like.
FLJ
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: Corposant on February 21, 2010, 04:33:59 pm
The Good:
               Have got four Hornby locos working. First trodden on (by an adult!) just after Christmas, the other three raked out of a leaky greenhouse by our eldest son - where they'd been for several years!

The Bad:
              My misgivings over maintaining light tension on the lateral lines of the puffer boom have proved well founded! The original attempt using lengths of elastic worked but was rather crude. Because of the success of a pulley system for another line on the boom, I took the same approach for the lateral lines - as described earlier in this thread but 5 sheaves (effectively 3) were not enough. Having endured some bone chilling sessions in the garage making a 7 sheave system (effectively 5),

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00933.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00953.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00950.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00924.jpg)

I now find that the extra drag created means that too much tension has to be applied to the lower block to prevent the lines going slack. The small weights attached to the ends of the thread (which can be seen in the video) help but the overall picture is one of diminishing returns.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00922.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00922.flv)

Another factor is the "reaving": very fiddly in the mock-up but would try the patience of a saint when mounted in the hull.

The Ugly:
              Cleo must have heard what I said about her and she is coming to get me.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00834.jpg)

I'm not sure what she plans to do with this, but I wouldn't like to be in my shoes.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00846.jpg)

It must be said, she's a lot better looking than me.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00878.jpg)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: dhenrypat on February 22, 2010, 12:59:28 am
I'm using a microperm motor that has been sitting around for donkey's years!  7.2 V, and a 1 3/4" prop.  Sorry I don't know the pitch, but I suspect that it's about 2" - 2 1/2".  Looks about right in motion on the water, but I may do a bit more experimenting with the gear ratios.  At the moment,the maximum rpm is about 850.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Clyde Puffer
Post by: FullLeatherJacket on February 22, 2010, 08:14:09 am
I may do a bit more experimenting with the gear ratios.  At the moment,the maximum rpm is about 850.

I think you'll need to. I'd start with at least 2000RPM if I were you.
FLJ
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: Corposant on February 27, 2010, 05:16:18 pm
The good, the bad and the ugly doesn't seem to have evoked much interest. No surprises there!

Reverting to the original system works to my satisfaction but relies on two long lengths of shirring elastic. Sorry about the quality of the video.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00975.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00975.mp4)

I would really like to avoid using elastic on the grounds that it perishes but...

How does one go about finding long, very weak (about 25g) extension springs? Obviously I want to avoid buying a succession of ones which prove unsuccessful.

(Actually I'm getting fed up with all this development and want to start getting everything in the hull.)

Mike
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: boatmadman on February 27, 2010, 05:57:23 pm
Corposant,

Over 220 hits shows people are interested, just not commenting.

Anyway, love the ugly - we have a black one!

Oh, your model work is great as well %)

Re springs, had you thought about making your own, its not that hard, and here is a thread on another forum showing how its done:

http://madmodder.net/index.php?topic=2734.0

Ian
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: Corposant on February 27, 2010, 06:39:14 pm
Ian

I wasn't surprised nobody commented - I didn't ask any questions! The help I've had from my other posts has been fantastic - and yours is no exception! What a brilliant article, just the sort of thing I was looking for. Thanks for sharing it.

Thank you too for your comment about my efforts - it's a good job they're not in focus!

Regards,
            Mike
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: The long Build on February 27, 2010, 06:59:25 pm
Most dogs settle for a ball or a small stick , but yours goes for the whole tree !!! :}
Title: Re: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Post by: Corposant on February 27, 2010, 07:19:03 pm
I have a confession to make! She's not actually our dog, she belongs to our daughter and son-in-law. We get to take her out for a "walk" three or four times a week. She is amazingly adept at finding the balance point of the bigger branches she "fetches"!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on February 27, 2010, 10:10:09 pm
All topics merged.

 This is a great project!  :-))
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on February 27, 2010, 10:49:32 pm
aldi have boxes of springs on offer, they some times have them in when there is not one , a couple of hundred springs of all types for a few pounds.

Peter
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on February 27, 2010, 10:57:45 pm
by the way I think you may be supprised at the number of people who look at this sort of thing, in time there will probably be lots of people linking to how to do it when questions are asked in the future, I did one or to brass things in the past and was surprised at the number reading but not asking questions.
keep up the good work
Peter
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on February 27, 2010, 11:55:02 pm
" surprised at the number reading but not asking questions."

   I, for one, am just sitting back in awe of Mike's audacity to even attempt such a feat!   :o
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on February 28, 2010, 08:42:42 am
Peter

I feel I must apologise for my "lack of interest" remark. It was not meant to be a whinge - honest!

Many thanks for your previous help and for the tip about Aldi. Unfortunately their nearest store to us is 6 or 7 miles away from us but I'll keep my eyes peeled on their website.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on February 28, 2010, 08:55:50 am
Martin,

You have been busy! Your trawl net seems to have found my other "faux pas" too!!

"Audacity" - that's a good word! I hope my posts give encouragement to beginners like me.

I have to say that, without your forum and it's members, I would have given up!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on February 28, 2010, 09:06:35 am
Peter

I feel I must apologise for my "lack of interest" remark. It was not meant to be a whinge - honest!

Many thanks for your previous help and for the tip about Aldi. Unfortunately their nearest store to us is 6 or 7 miles away from us but I'll keep my eyes peeled on their website.

Mike
I cannot get out myself but I will ask my wife to pop in and ill send you a box if they have them, I buy the odd bit from them when they have offers they are not always the best you can get but the likes of the router cutters have got me out of a fix a few times with a odd shaped cutter that I will only say use once and a set of 12 is cheaper than one cutter from B+Q and does the job, same goes for some of the other tools.

Peter
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on February 28, 2010, 09:10:08 am

Many thanks for your previous help and for the tip about Aldi. Unfortunately their nearest store to us is 6 or 7 miles away from us but I'll keep my eyes peeled on their website.

Mike

PM sent.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Bradley on February 28, 2010, 09:30:27 am
Mike,
You will find that if you go to Aldi's website you can get them to send you weekly emails about their special offers. :-))

Derek.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on February 28, 2010, 12:52:04 pm
Peter,

Thanks again for your kind offer - and do give my kind regards to your wife. What would we do without them!

Martin,

Thanks too for your offer - I'm getting inundated!

Derek,

That's a good idea, I hadn't noticed that.

Many thanks,

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on February 28, 2010, 02:09:15 pm
would a boom made of brass rod help ? it would act more like the real thing and a spring may not be as important

Peter
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on February 28, 2010, 02:45:12 pm
Peter

I think the weight would be a problem with the boom swung over the side. See Bunkerbarge's warning of 07 October last year and his link http://www.albanyaerialphotos.com/stellamare.htm.

Martin claims to have contemplated a steel boom when making Jan's puffer!

The problem lies with the lines which are used to manipulate the boom in real life. I did contemplate using them for this purpose on the model but it was immediately apparent that this would be impractical - so they are purely decorative. It was your idea of using a pulley system, which worked brilliantly for the other "slack line", that prompted my efforts for the two lines in question.

Thanks for your continued interest,

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 17, 2010, 05:00:45 pm
Rather than adding even more temporary stuff to the mock-up, I resolved to start fitting everything into the hull before sorting out lateral boom movement....... but the seeds of doubt grew and grew in my mind: What if it doesn't work?

So, here's the next stage in the saga:

Some months ago, I painstakingly fitted a plastic gear to a servo in order to increase it's rotation:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00987.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00986.jpg)

only to discover, more recently, that FLJ sells a "servo stretcher"!

Before investing in the P96 and bearing in mind that driving the boom with the gooseneck pivot puts the servo at huge "mechanical disadvantage", I made up (out of an old piece of curtain rail) the direct drive linkage shown below.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00976.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00977.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00978.jpg)

The design allowed for it to slip if there was a jam but in practice the servo will simply stall, so I will be able to make it a lot neater.

The video shows the original plan in action.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00979.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00985.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00985.mp4)

Followed by the direct drive (as yet without P96).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00988.jpg)

(Note the ever decreasing length of the mast!)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00989.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00989.mp4)

The jerky boom movement, improved a bit with the direct drive, is not helped by the small knob on top of the Tx. I know, I'll fit a bigger one!

Is there anything else that needs testing before resuming work on the hull?
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 20, 2010, 04:43:59 pm
O bother (or something very similar), I've had an idea!

While my mind was re-visiting the boom lateral line tension problem, I thought let's try using one large pulley instead of several little ones - thus reducing the drag effect. So, did a quick calculation and reckoned that one of about 25mm diameter would take up the slack with 5 turns. With this attached to a small sheave of about 5mm diameter, tension would need to be applied over a distance of about 90mm - i.e. quite manageable.

So, I attacked a sheave from an old chart recorder with the lathe, lashed it onto the dreaded mock-up and the result is shown in the video:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV00990.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV00990.mp4)

The result showed such promise that the chap in the drawing office applied himself to the task with his usual efficiency:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00992.jpg)

I know what you're thinking - why on earth didn't he do that in the first place!

But then disaster struck. He thought, before I embark on this new idea, let's reconsider moving the boom by pulling it to and fro. (This approach had been rejected earlier on the basis of a quick experiment and anticipated problems when raising the boom - something that the yachting fraternity don't have to deal with!)

I have decided it could be possible. (The chap in the drawing office thinks so anyway.) The advantages are that the "mechanical disadvantage" of the servo would not apply and the system would not require such delicate control of the tension.

So, before I abandon several month's work on getting the boom to swing satisfactorily, I would greatly appreciate some advice.

Is there any reason why the lateral line bulwark attachment points should not be moved further for'ard - to about where the samson posts are sited? See plan:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00991.jpg)

A difficulty I can see is that I propose to site the shrouds further aft as I cannot believe that in real life the aft-most one would be in line with the mast.

Any suggestions warmly welcomed!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 26, 2010, 10:14:48 pm
Am I chuffed or what!

In my last post, I was contemplating a radical change in moving the boom laterally. Driving it from the pivot point didn't seem mechanically sound. The aim was to pull it to and fro, as in real life. (As I mentioned, this had been unsuccessful many moons ago.)

Using a sail winch seemed the obvious approach.

First problem: They're expensive!
Second problem: They're much chunkier that a normal servo.
Third problem: It would need a pretty large diameter drum.
Solution: Make my own!

I had some plastic gears left over from my re-construction of the winch and the drum was turned up from a piece of acrylic sheet.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00994.jpg)

The intermediate gear and final pinion had brass sleeves inserted.
The spindles were soldered in using a wood block to get them vertical.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01002.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01008.jpg)

The result mounted in the mock-up:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01025.jpg)

The video shows the result:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01024.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01024.flv)

It needs some refinement. The swing is not quite as far as I would like but FLJ's servo-stretcher should sort that. Since cutting off the bottom of the mast, the mock-up has become very wobbly but it has served it's purpose well and I now have a further incentive to start getting everything into the hull!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on April 27, 2010, 07:17:42 am
Most impressive!
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Roger in France on April 27, 2010, 07:54:40 am
Wow!

Well done.

Roger in France
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 27, 2010, 09:17:06 am
Thanks guys. I was particularly pleased that it worked with the lines (sheets?) going through the deck that far for'ard, which means an almost 90 deg swing is possible.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Archibald H. on April 27, 2010, 10:17:41 am
Brilliant model engineering, this is!

Cheerz, A!H.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 27, 2010, 11:04:14 am
Archibald,

Thanks for your kind comment. I don't think that "brilliant" is the right word though!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Tug-Kenny on April 27, 2010, 08:25:25 pm

Nice piece of engineering. I'm going to say Brilliant as well. You deserve it.   O0

Ken


Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Archibald H. on April 27, 2010, 10:36:09 pm
Nice piece of engineering. I'm going to say Brilliant as well. You deserve it.   O0
Ken

Hear, hear!
A!H
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 27, 2010, 11:33:34 pm
Thanks Ken. I've lost count of the number of superb models you've made since I started my attempt. I see that Bunkerbarge says "If you worry about how long it takes, you'd go crazy." - so all is explained!

Archibald, thanks again!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 31, 2010, 08:31:10 pm
Anyone reading this section of the saga must be prepared to have their mind boggled. My lack of simple engineering skills is causing some startling solutions to problems. Those of you who have been taking an interest in the project may remember my yearning to use springs instead of elastic to maintain tension on the boom lateral lines. You may remember also that the chap in the drawing office had the bright idea of using a large ratio double pulley to achieve this. I had several 25mm chart recorder pulleys to hand, so.....

Problem 1.
               These pulley wheels had a 3.2mm bore and I wanted the secondary diameter to be 2.5mm. They also needed to be mounted from one side. So..... I made brass spindles, tapped 8 BA, so that the wheel could be secured with a washer and a bolt. The idea was to then bolt on the 2.5mm diameter bit over the top using acrylic material.

Problem 2.
               How to mount this in the lathe and produce a fairly complex shape? Decision: make it in two parts and glue together, using 6mm acrylic sheet and 8 - 10mm rod. The former I had in stock, the latter I hoped to buy at Beale Park. Sadly, no acrylic rod at Beale Park, so turned down a jumbo chunk using 4 - jaw chuck!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01044.jpg)
Starting materials.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01045.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01046.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01047.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01058.jpg)
Mounted inside out.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01059.jpg)
Showing spring.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01063.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01063.mp4)

I suppose I should be grateful that they seem to work OK!

If that's not enough to convince you I need to be on medication - there's more!

The "home made sail winch", made out of gears already "in stock", didn't swing the boom quite far enough and I couldn't get FLJ's P96 servo stretcher to behave as I wanted [I must stress that, having discussed it with Dave at Wicksteed on Saturday, he put me right on this and there is nothing wrong with the P96.] - so I decided to use a larger gear ratio, going from 48/12 teeth to 60/12 teeth.

Problem 3.
               Couldn't find a source for the latter. Bought a 60 tooth single gear.

Problem 4.
               6mm bore and a jumbo boss! Solution: Hybridization!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01051.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01052.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01053.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01054.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01055.jpg)

The new arrangement will allow for a larger winding drum with deeper channels, thus removing the possibility of the thread riding up over the edge.

Time to send fot the van and men in white coats!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: DickyD on May 31, 2010, 08:56:09 pm
Bit late in the day I know but have you tried Technobots in Totton Southampton for gears etc. our club members use them quite a lot.

http://www.technobots.co.uk/index.html
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 31, 2010, 09:30:37 pm
Hi Dicky,
            I've had a quick look but they don't appear to stock one to fit my need. Mind you, if I was starting from scratch, I think they probably would - my problem was starting with a mod 0.5 gear which I had to hand and then wanting to change the ratio!

Many thanks for the link to the site, it looks like a good source for all sorts of bits I might need in the future.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on June 26, 2010, 07:09:20 pm
Talking with Steamboat Phil and NoMustang Mark at Alford, a few weeks ago, I mentioned that I was thinking of changing the steering arrangement from servo horn drive to drum drive - using a one turn sail winch. Their advice was: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". If I had taken heed, it would have saved a lot of time and money!

The motive for making the change was that it is a bit fiddly to set up without getting slack in the "non-pulled" length of chain, especially at the extremes of rudder travel. The two bottom pulleys are adjustable for this purpose.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01070.jpg)

View from rear:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01073.jpg)

and the side:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01072.jpg)

I purchased a sail winch (£17 inc. postage) and set it in the original "test bed". It was going to need a drum of about 15mm.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01069.jpg)

It soon became apparent that this diameter was going to be critical and maintaining taughtness would need the same arrangement that I had already. Introducing springs did not help, which was disappointing because they work in the boom swinging mechanism.

So: Project abandoned. If Steamboat Phil and/or NoMustang Mark offer you advice, take it!

The other thing I've had to re-visit is maintaining gentle tension on the secondary line attached to the boom.

The prototype worked well:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01265.jpg)

as did the purpose-built block, seen to the right of this picture:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00924.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00881.jpg)

With the advent of the central servo to swing the boom, however, it needed moving a fair distance to starboard and this led to unreliable operation.

So, undaunted, I decided I needed a high ratio double pulley-wheel, as used successfully in maintaining tension in the lateral boom lines.

Problem: How do you make one of these?

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01068.jpg)

I don't have any 28mm round stock (or a local supplier) and even if I did, I don't have the tooling to reach that deep - so the disc had to be made from sheet. I first tried soldering the the roughly shaped disc to the hub section but it sheared off when I tried to true it up. (Probably because in trying to avoid flooding the hub section with solder, the joint wasn't good.) Thought Oh bother (or something very similar).

Next time round, tapped hub and disc 4BA and this worked but cutting the groove produced nasty noises from the tool (0.6mm wide).

The result works

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01074.jpg)

(currently using a weight pending the find of a suitable spring.)

but I now find the 2.5mm section needs a shoulder on the nearside to keep the thread away from the disc as it is catching on the outer knot!

Making a new hub section is no problem but I don't fancy making another disc. Having put epoxy on the thread before assembly, I'll never get the hub section out in one piece. I'm thinking Oh bother (or something very similar)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on June 28, 2010, 08:23:31 pm
The matter of the catching knot is resolved! I've put it inside the disc. I know, I know, Why didn't I do that in the first place?

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01086.jpg)

As you can see, I've now resorted to elastic while looking for a spring. It will have to be very weak - perhaps a plastic one, if I can find one with a small enough diameter.

Going back to Martin's question of 10th October 2008: "How do you plan to overcome this?" (Yes twenty months ago!), I now feel in a position to answer: The boom falls reliably with an additional weight of 7.5g added.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01082.jpg)

This slug of stainless steel will be inserted into the end of the boom.

The reliability of the this fall is important because, if the line coming off the winding drum below deck goes slack, it will be necessary to pull the winch out to untangle it!

In practice, there could always be a small load on the hoist (probably the rowing boat) providing "belt and braces".

Without the help of forum members, I would certainly have given up - thanks guys!

A graveyard:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01078.jpg)

All of these items took a lot time to make but didn't live up to expectation! I take comfort from the thought that I'm probably not alone in this experience!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on June 28, 2010, 10:28:47 pm
Looking good Mike!

 Don't worry, it's building much faster than my current project.  <:(
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on June 28, 2010, 10:56:12 pm
Thanks Martin,

I cannot believe you're slower than me! Look at all the other stuff you do - Wicksteed for example - and you're a young man in gainful employment, I'm an old git in retirement!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: HS93 (RIP) on June 28, 2010, 11:20:10 pm
Thanks Martin,

I cannot believe you're slower than me! Look at all the other stuff you do - Wicksteed for example - and you're a young man in gainful employment, I'm an old git in retirement!

Mike

Oh belive it , he is THAT slow. %% %%

Peter {-)
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on June 29, 2010, 09:02:57 am
Oh well, we'll just have to share the motto "Slow and steady wins the race".
(If you believe that you'll believe anything!)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 27, 2011, 05:31:06 pm
My normal snail's pace came almost to a standstill last Summer. In June Mrs Corposant broke her wrist and then, in August, underwent major abdominal surgery, followed by more in January. The good news is she is now fully recovered and virtually back to her old self so here, at long last, is a progress report.

The process of transferring the mock-up to the hull is finally under way.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01143.jpg)

Several tasks need to be completed before permanently fitting the main deck:

Mounting the winch.
Considerations:
                     1. It needs to be easily removeable (in case there's a tangle below deck) but also secure.
                     2. One needs to be able to easily disconnect the wiring. (Relay control of the piston driving motor makes this a bit untidy.)

So...
Firstlly the aperture in the deck needs to be as large as possible (the winch has to be turned through 90 degrees during insertion and removal) which means the base plate cannot be directly bolted down. Solution: Use 1/4 turn clips.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01175.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01177.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01176.jpg)

In place:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01179.jpg)

and it looks plausible!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01180.jpg)

At this point, it might be worth mentioning the slipping clutches for the winding drums.
Cover removed from servo:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01014.jpg)

showing wiring to the motor:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01018.jpg)

The friction adjustment needed lock nuts, so a threaded shaft was inserted in the splined final gear. The picture shows this drilled and "morticed" to receive the shaft's shoulders:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01015.jpg)

Shaft inserted:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01016.jpg)

Cover back on and bits ready for assembly. Slip is provided by the celluloid washer and pressure by the spring (cut from copper out of an electrical contactor).
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01022.jpg)

Assembled:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01023.jpg)

Finished product:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01034-1.jpg)

Back to the deck! Next came making the holes for the boom lines to get below. (These had glass beads glued into recesses on the underside.)

Deciding on the exact positions for the holes was difficult because the ideal siting would mean the lines would foul the shrouds. (See the last bit of my post #160 on 20/3/10.) A much greater difficulty was caused by the chap in the drawing office. He thought it would look good if I created a couple of crew members who appeared to be hauling in/ paying out the boom lines. The thread would pass through the fists into the chest, round a pulley wheel and through the deck via the feet. Mounted on a cranked shaft, the pulley would thus push and pull the arms using thin, flexible "con rods".
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01199.jpg)

It took him several weeks to get this hair-brained idea out of his system. Factors like "How do you find a suitable plasic crew member to disembowel?", "You do realize all this has to fit in a figure about 2" high!" and "How long will this idea take to develop?" entered into the equation.

The saga contiues!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: farrow on March 29, 2011, 11:34:53 pm
Many years ago I watched one of the last puffers discharging coal in the western Ilses, she had a single whip wire rigged to the anchor winch going through a single block on the Jib head to the cargo grab. Waqs interesting to watch as the only one person operated the gear and consequently discharged her.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 30, 2011, 05:05:59 pm
Hi Old Dodes

You lucky chap! My experience is limited to the VIC32, which has been converted to holiday accommodation, so is not quite the same as a working puffer. Having said that, it makes for a brilliant "holiday"!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: dodgy geezer on March 30, 2011, 07:44:40 pm

 A much greater difficulty was caused by the chap in the drawing office. He thought it would look good if I created a couple of crew members who appeared to be hauling in/ paying out the boom lines. The thread would pass through the fists into the chest, round a pulley wheel and through the deck via the feet. Mounted on a cranked shaft, the pulley would thus push and pull the arms using thin, flexible "con rods"...


If I were doing this I would make figures whose arms were springy and centre-biased. I would pass the rope through a very narrow hole in their fists. Then I would tie a succession of small knots in the rope at 2" intervals.

As the rope went through the hole in the fist, it would catch and pull the arm back. Then the knot would squeeze through the hole, and the arm would spring back, ready for the next knot......
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 30, 2011, 10:34:06 pm
Hi Dodgy

That's a goodly thought! It would need a bit of experimentation - I suspect the knots would cause a problem going through the sheaves on the end of the boom, they're only 2.5mm in diameter. I'll mention it to the chap in the drawing office - but it will have to be kept secret from Mrs Corposant, she'll go potty if I re-visit the idea! She keeps saying "Why don't you just get on with it?"

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: dodgy geezer on March 31, 2011, 12:02:12 am
I was imagining very thin dacron, where a single loop knot would be pretty indistinguishable from the rest of the line. But I am not sure how thick your rope is. You might be able to thicken the rope at 2" intervals with a spot of glue, or, if it's quite thick, put a little pinhead inside the rope at intervals and have a fragment of niobium magnet in the fists of the figures.

Easier than working the arms with rods.....
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 31, 2011, 12:11:07 pm
Dodgy

I had ditched the idea of rods in favour of pulling sprung arms with thread but then came the realization that I wouldn't be able to fit a crankshaft with a long enough throw within the chest cavity. Your idea of moving the arms with some form of latching arrangement at intervals along the rope would solve the problem. I think using magnets would be better than snatching knots. I'm using 0.25mm polyester rope from Miskin Models - probably a bit thin for ferrous inserts. Definitely food for thought though!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: dodgy geezer on March 31, 2011, 02:43:57 pm
0.25mm IS a bit small, though we are only talking about pushing tips of needles in - 0.5mm would be much better. And even small fragments of neodymium magnets have a fantastic strength...   Dots of glue would work well for any diameter, however....
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on March 31, 2011, 05:06:11 pm
Dodgy

We'll just have to see if the chap in the drawing office comes up with something feasible! ...Unless you produce a working prototype!!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 03, 2011, 07:56:34 pm
Back to the build...

At this stage I decided to bite the bullet and change the prop and prop-shaft. This is rather boring (even more than the rest of the build) but is included for the benefit of first timers like me. I had fitted the originals at the start of the build but after only two brief sessions in the domestic test tank, the shaft became "crunchy" to turn. Yes, I had thoroughly greased it but it was a rather loose fit in the tube.

The old tube came out fairly easily by first removing the epoxy from the motor end seated in a bulkhead and as much as possible from the point where it went through the hull and then, after tapping out the aft bush with a rod, using a round file in a hand brace turned anti-clockwise.

The valley in the bulkhead got a bit damaged in the process, so I made it larger and filled the gap with silicone sealant when the new tube was inserted. (Making removeable, non-stick shuttering for this taxed my little grey cells!) I thought the resilient nature of this would be an advantage but now I'm not so sure.

Re-mounting the motor also presented problems. My first installation had been rather crude, so I decided on a bought mounting bracket, seated on a plywood plate glued to the bottom of the hull - but because of the uneven surface, it had to be very thin to get the motor low enough with the result that I ended up using a brass plate with 6BA holes tapped in it.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01187.jpg)

The siting of this was designed for the use of a universal coupling.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01194.jpg)

However, I decided to abandon this coupling in favour of silicone rubber tubing and for this I had to make this adapter:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01195.jpg)

The length of this is such that, if I change my mind again, there will still be space for the previous coupling.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01197.jpg)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 25, 2011, 09:21:40 pm
The transfer of the servo for lateral boom movement from the mock-up to the hull went smoothly.

The mounting bolts also hold the additional gearing in place so tapped holes were needed. The upper two were simply tapped through the ply bulkhead, hardened with superglue. (Nuts could be added on the other side if necessary.)

An extra piece of ply, backed by a brass plate, was mounted in the gap of the bulkhead for the bottom holes. This was kept as small as possible to allow access through the gap. (Also for wiring.)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01140-1.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01139-1.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01164.jpg)

The last picture also shows the pulley wheel for maintaining tension on the secondary line attached to the boom. This was mounted on a shaft using a 12 BA stud sleeved with stainless steel. Shirring elastic will be used pending the finding of a sufficiently weak spring. (I would love to try making my own, as per Ian boatmadman's advice [Reply #143 27th Feb. last year] but the management's reaction to using the domestic kiln for this purpose doesn't bear thinking about!)

The pulley wheels used in maintaining tension on the lateral boom lines, caused a few problems.

The mock-up had no hull sides and the pulley wheels had been mounted inside out for ease of access, so mounting them required the making of plates with new shafts which could be glued in place.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01154.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01160.jpg)

Bits of cocktail stick were superglued to the backs and pared down to adjust the angle against the hull. This was necessary to align the larger wheels with the lines coming through the deck and to keep the lines coming off the small wheels clear of the hull sides back to their anchorage points on the rear bulkhead.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01163.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01168.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01166.jpg)

The smaller pulley wheels had been secured to the mock-up with PVA but epoxy was used in the hull.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01157.jpg)

Incidentally, I have been wondering if "pulley wheels" is the correct term. Should they be called sheaves? I have assumed that, to be called a sheave, the wheel needs to be mounted in a block.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 08, 2011, 10:19:02 pm
My current posts for the build are a bit boring as they are simply describing the transfer of bits from A to B. I include them for completeness.

This stage covers the steering gear.

For the mock-up, I had made a frame to mount the steering servo using odd bits of "doll's house ply".

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01070.jpg)

The plan was to make a "proper" one when fitting into the hull but finding suitable ply (without actually resorting to buying it!) proved fruitless. Those pieces thick enough fell apart in water.
So... having removed the tempory frame from the mock-up, it was time for re-assessment. Slightly out of square but, below deck, not going to show! The doll's house ply survived a long soak in water, so decision made! Here it is in the hull (with rear deck also in place).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01184.jpg)

The siting of the steering chain necessitated a re-arrangement of the apertures in the sides of the deck-house.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01173.jpg)

The next pictures show the method of mounting the pulley blocks.

View from inside, before fixing:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01171.jpg)

View from outside, after fixing:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01174.jpg)

This one shows the other two pulley blocks mounted in the deck (Secured from below by 10BA nuts.)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01185.jpg)

The need for access to the steering gear governed the decision on how much of the deck-house needed to be removeable.

Sorry! I've just realized I haven't got any pictures of this - so more shortly. Meanwhile here's a video of it working:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01202.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01202.mp4)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 09, 2011, 07:47:20 pm
Here are the deck-house pictures:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01208.jpg)

The extra arms on the servo will be used for turning the steering wheel (which I shall have to make as the white metal one from the kit is equivalent to about 1.4 metres in diameter!).

The brass strips are designed to grip the removeable section. Being thin they can be bent slightly to allow for wear and thickness of paint/varnish (if I ever get that far!).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01207.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01209.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01210.jpg)

The next job will be sorting out the ballast. For the initial floatings a block of Lead weighing 2.5 Kg has been required but I decided to weigh all the bits that weren't present at the time. The white metal bits, funnel, mast and boom weigh 580g and the winch weighs 296g, making a total of 876g! This was a bit disconcerting as a lot of this stuff will be mounted quite high up (needing only about 1.6Kg in the bottom).

I was encouraged on reading the excellent article on ballasting by Richard Simpson in the Model Boat Construction Special supplement. The crew members are particularly heavy, so I will replace those with plastic and I was planning to make the stern grating out of wood anyway. The trouble with making new fittings is the time it takes! I was hoping to mount the radio-control gear quite high up for ease of access but that is something that can be dropped down.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 09, 2011, 10:28:34 pm
I had promised myself that I would not update this build until the main deck was glued in. However...

The decision to add a bilge pump (just in case!) has caused a dilemma (see September's post for that saga!), so I thought I would wait until Warwick before making a final decision.

Thus it came to pass that the steering wheel project was started. The white metal one seems too large, so a wooden one has been attempted:

Four pieces of teak were used for the felloes (eight being deemed too fiddly!) superglued together and stuck to a bit of broom handle with PVA for mounting in the lathe.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01363.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01365.jpg)

A 1/4" oak dowel was made and glued into the centre to form the nave. A central hole was then bored.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01366.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01367.jpg)

Not having a suitable tool to remove the waste material, I used an unsuitable one!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01377.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01378.jpg)

Eight holes were then drilled round the periphery and into the nave. This went very badly! It was not possible to keep the holes aligned going into the oak, the lignified bits being very hard and the vascular bits being soft. (I had used lignified bits from the same piece of old furniture when making the pulley blocks described earlier but the annular rings were not wide enough for the nave.)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01380.jpg)

A rummage in the box of scrap wood produced another piece with finer annular rings and after turning it down, the holes were drilled directly into this and a section inserted where the failed one had been bored out. This time it was left as a sliding fit and not glued.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01382.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01385.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01383.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01386.jpg)

Oddly enough, the new piece of oak proved unsatisfactory for the spokes, so strips from the original were cut, sliced and sanded down to 1.5mm. (A bit painstaking!)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01388.jpg)

After cutting into 17mm lengths, the inner tips were rounded, the holes in the teak made square using a piece of fretsaw blade and the spokes inserted thus:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01389.jpg)

A lberal coating of cyano was applied and the wheel sliced off in the lathe.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01392.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01393.jpg)

I wondered whether to make a new frame but thought it would be simpler to use the white metal one supplied. By the time I had finished hacking it about and coping with its softness, I realized this was a big mistake! It needed to be de-mountable and had nothing with which to fix it to the deck. The only good thing about this was that, to make a bracket, it forced me to do some milling on the lathe (for the first time - previously I have used the pillar drill!).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01368.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01369.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01370.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01376.jpg)

Next, the spindle with pulley for turning with thread from the rudder servo:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01398.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01402.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01404.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01406.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01407.jpg)

The wheel needs finishing off and a less fiddly means of attaching the thread to the servo arms but it seems to work!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01408.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01408.mp4)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Ferry Across The Mersey on November 10, 2011, 07:42:08 am
Hi Mike,

Just watched your video clip and it looks fantastic. A work of art. I bet you're pleased with the result so far, from design to seeing it actually work must be really satisfying.

Thanks Antony
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 10, 2011, 09:21:46 am
Anthony

Many thanks for your comments. Just a bit of delicate carving of the spokes and a brass boss left to do! Mrs Corposant says "But who's going to see it?" I have big problems with the chap in the drawing office - he comes up with these bright ideas, which look simple on paper. I then get the job of trying to make them!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: ooyah/2 on November 11, 2011, 11:31:08 am
Mike.

You are doing a grand job of making all the bits and pieces to make the boat fully operational.

May I suggest that on viewing the rudder bar that you make some small changes.
As the arm is quite short the sweep of the arc is to the opposite of that to the chain drive and will give limited rudder movement.
If you lengthen the arm to be in line with the chain coming from the 2- pulley wheels you will come more in line to the arc of the chain drive, it will be even better if you lengthen the arm to go beyond the straight line between the 2- guide pulleys  of the chain drive you will get an even better rudder movement and as you will be putting a grating over the chain drive it will not be noticed as being out of scale.

When I built my Skylight I put a spring on either side of the servo arm, although this was to stop any hitting of the rudder in transport it worked out that it allowed the tension on the chain drive to work better.
Here is a couple of pics of the rudder set up, unfortunately I don't have one of the rudder bar with the grating removed, the wheel house on the pic isn't on straight, I missed that before photographing.
George.
P.S.  I can't find your video pics, can you give me the link.

(http://s8.postimage.org/63lw0hhwx/PUFFER_2.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/63lw0hhwx/)

(http://s10.postimage.org/xgk551rx1/PUFFER_5.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/xgk551rx1/)

(http://s9.postimage.org/waihipat7/PUFFER_9.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/waihipat7/)

(http://s9.postimage.org/ebjqendvf/Puffer_in_boot.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/ebjqendvf/)
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Harald on November 11, 2011, 09:12:25 pm
Hi Mike,
just saw this thread the first time - unbelievable, what you achieved with the working derrick!
Concerning the rudder, I also added two extra blocks and lengthened the rudderstock on my MFM Highlander.

You can see more in thread 'Mountfleet Highlander' (Sorry don't know how to create a link).

Harald
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 12, 2011, 08:23:03 pm
George

Thankyou for your words of encouragement!

When I made the brass rudder bar, I copied the white metal jobbie that came with the kit. The chap in the drawing office came up with several ideas for the steering geometry and his underling produced mock-ups. It has to be said that bits of cardboard, cotton and drawing pins always work much better than brass pulleys and chain! The end result was the rudder turning through 90 degs.

So, my reaction to your suggestion? You're absolutely right! It had never occurred to me to deviate from the Caldercraft design but being a "generic" puffer, there is no reason not to - and the wheelhouse is going to be a different shape anyway!

I did try including springs but found they had a tendency to stretch when the rudder was being pulled (rather than taking up the slack in the other half of the circuit). The rather long route over several pulley wheels seemed to be the reason for this - they worked well in the mock-up!

It will be a simple task to make a longer rudder bar, so I will definitely give it a go! Many thanks for your advice.

When you say you can't find the videos, do you mean all of them? All the pictures and videos come from "Photobucket" and the videos should run when the cursor is clicked on the image. I have developed a strong dislike for the website, especially the advertising, and Martin had to sort out a major problem for me some time ago - but it's a bit late to change now!

Sorry about the delay in replying - been to the show at Warwick,

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 12, 2011, 08:36:16 pm
Harald

My apologies to you too for the delay in replying - the boat show was well worth the visit!

Many thanks for your kind words. I'm hopeful of making better progress now the weather gives me the excuse not to work outdoors!

Thankyou too for confirming Geoge's advice on the steering geometry.

Yes, I have been following your build with interest!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 22, 2011, 07:53:00 pm
A mini update: I've finished the steering wheel!

Before:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01392.jpg)

After:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01517.jpg)

Simple as that ......... Well, not quite!

I had debated, at an early stage, whether to shape the spokes in the lathe before inserting them but not having a revolving tailstock, I decided this would not be feasible. So, here's a picture of me beavering away with scalpel and needle files!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01421.jpg)

I didn't want to reduce the spokes too much at their thinnest points, for obvious reasons. The oak seemed reasonably robust - but it's easy to become complacent!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01499.jpg)

I thought "Oh bother" (or something very similar).

It was obviously not going to be possible to glue them back. I thought about inserting bits of wire but decided it would be easier to make new ones with pegs on them:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01500.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01502.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01504.jpg)

I.e. Taken down to 1.5mm, then a 0.75mm peg formed and finally chamfered with a tool having about the right angle.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01510.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01508.jpg)

0.75mm holes were drilled in the broken spokes and the new handles glued in, followed by shaping to match the others:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01517.jpg)

And finally dabs of stain on the spokes:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01518.jpg)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 24, 2011, 04:58:48 pm
Following Ooyah/2's suggestion that I use a longer rudder arm and looking at Harald's extra pulleys, I selected a suitable piece of brass but before I started work on it, the chap in the drawing office raked out the steering geometry test bed. The servo end bears the scars of the aborted attempt to use a sail winch instead of a servo arm but the rudder end is still intact.

The first video shows the current arrangement. The effective length of the rudder arm is 25mm.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01520.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01520.mp4)

It achieves a comfortable 90 deg. rudder swing.

Extending the arm to 40mm extends the swing to 98 deg.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01521.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01521.mp4)

Obviously, when using just levers, the maximum achievable swing is 180 deg. but for this, the pulleys need to be in line with the rudder stem (and the arm gets locked in the extreme positions).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01522.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01522.mp4)

So, following Harald's thinking, the "pulleys" were moved right to the edge of the hull.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01523.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01523.mp4)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01524.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01524.mp4)

The 25mm arm achieved a swing of 113 deg. and the 40mm 123 deg. So, extending the rudder arm increases the swing by 8 - 10 deg. while moving the pulleys gives an increase of 23 - 25 deg.

There are one or two problems: Firstly, extending the arm requires additional chain travel (c. 24mm in each direction). The servo arm has sufficient adjustment to support a rudder arm extended to c. 30mm but there would be a loss of mechanical advantage.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01070.jpg)

Secondly, the pulleys could not realistically be moved that close to the edge of the hull.

When the chap in the drawing office presented his findings to his underling, it was decided to wait and see how the model performs on the water before making any changes.

Many thanks to George and Harald for their stimulating thoughts!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 07, 2012, 07:33:30 pm
It’s only 6 months since my last update - am I getting quicker?

I had decided that the steering wheel was finished (bar a coat of varnish) so it was back to the bilge pump. Although I had got the Halford’s non self-priming screen washer pump to work, it would need mounting in the bottom of the hull and I was not confident in the reliability of operation - so the whole exercise was put down to experience.

The trip to Warwick (very enjoyable) saw the purchase of a Hunter Systems self-priming jobbie plus sensor circuit. It was decided to mount it behind the rear bulkhead - what could be simpler? Anyone who’s  looked at my previous antics on this build won’t be surprised that things didn’t go smoothly!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01559.jpg)

The two mounting bolts were no problem but I needed to create four dimples to accommodate the screw heads protruding from the casing so that it would sit flush against the bulkhead. Tugboat Ken’s phrase “Like trying to paper the hall through the letterbox” kept springing to mind. Working blind, it was difficult/impossible to find appropriate tools, get them in the right place and manipulate them through the deckhouse aperture, with the result that I ended up with holes going right through  - so I could have started  from the outside in the first place!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01563.jpg)

 Any sensible person would have simply replaced the screws with countersunk ones.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01566.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01567.jpg)

Holding the inlet tube at the lowest point in the hull, together with the sensor, proved  fiddly and involved  paring my fingers apart with a scalpel, having superglued them together. The blood loss was minimal and the management’s comments were re-interpreted to be tenderly sympathetic.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01585.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01587.jpg)

Video - I’ve just noticed that Photobucket no longer puts  “film edges” on video clips.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV01589.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV01589.mp4)

While all this was going on, the chap in the drawing office was making a nuisance of himself saying, “Shouldn’t the steering wheel have brass rings?” I kept ignoring him and pressed on with mounting the battery pack (6v) for the pump and ran some resin into the port side to ensure any water found it’s way to the pump inlet.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01590.jpg)

 The main deck was finally glued in place.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01625.jpg)

In response to that nagging voice, I did an Internet survey of ship’s wheels and the vast majority had brass rings! So I gave in.

My first thought was to slice thin sections from brass tubing and polish them down to a reasonable thickness. Finding nothing suitable in stock, it seemed madness to buy in a length and only use a mm or two.

The next idea was to mount a piece of acrylic sheet on a mandrel, mount it in the lathe, turn it down to 25mm and stick shim material on with contact adhesive. It nearly worked but the resilience of the adhesive  meant that the shim was torn off when trying to cut the ring. The disc also twisted round on the mandrel as it was fixed on with a screw.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01554.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01556.jpg)

I thought cyano would be better and could still be dissolved off with acetone so I mounted an acrylic block in the lathe and turned it down to 25mm as before.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01592.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01595.jpg)

 After sticking on the shim and using a boring tool with the lathe in reverse, to give a slicing action, it still didn’t work. The ring peeled off prematurely, I think because the cyano was going off before I could press the shim firmly in place. I thought, “Oh bother!” - or something very similar. The management made several suggestions as to what else I could be doing with my life but the chap in the drawing office can be a right pain in the a**e when he gets a bee in his bonnet.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01665.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01666.jpg)

Ironically, contact adhesive worked if I left it for a couple of days to dry out thoroughly before working on it.

Every picture tells a story!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01669.jpg)

Rear view:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01672.jpg)

Front view:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01671.jpg)

Whatever next?

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 17, 2012, 07:02:02 pm
I thought I would add a kit assembly stage so that other beginners can learn from my mistakes.

After gluing the main deck, the next job was to pull in the hull sides. The manual says to do this after fitting the capping rails but I thought that would be asking for trouble.

I filed notches in the hull for the stay-bars and glued them into the deck. Then, after a final warming and tightening of the cloth strips, I glued them to the hull. Finally the excess was cut off.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01656.jpg)

Boat on its side. Pegs to add a bit of weight.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01662.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01663.jpg)

I have decided to leave fitting the hatch coaming for now as I am working on the platform for the RC components. There was no piece of timber of the right size for the stem piece, so I made one out of scrap.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01626.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01640.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01644.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01645.jpg)

The cutwaters needed a lot of gouging out  to make them fit on the hull.

For the capping rails, I made up a jig and used a 1.5mm cutter in the lathe.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01683.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01684.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01676.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01674.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01678.jpg)

There were two strips in the kit, each long enough for both hull sides. One was short-grained, so rejected on the grounds that it would not survive being bent. The other piece was wetted and formed round the management’s colander, using a hot-air gun. Not surprisingly, because of its rectangular cross-section, it needed a lot of weights to keep it flat.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01687.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01689.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01693.jpg)

The anchor davit was a different size from the plan and needed a deeper collar to raise it, so that the cleat did not foul the cutwater when turning.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01954.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01955.jpg)

Hang on a minute, something’s wrong here. I don’t appear to have made any mistakes! I’ll try to do better next time.  :-)

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: tassie48 on May 18, 2012, 12:39:25 am
sailed on a old Dredger 30 odd years ago with chain steering and large adjuster slides in the chain lines we had to grease and adjust the slides big bottle screws to look at to keep the right tension on the chain was hard work steering her even with a small eletric motor helping tassie48
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 18, 2012, 10:57:33 am
Tassie

I imagine the gear on your dredger was a bit more substantial than this!

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/08_06_14_01035.jpg)

The picture is of the VIC56 moored at Chatham dockyard. I imagine there's a bit of slack in the wheel!

I envy you your experience on board (including the hard work!) - I am a complete landlubber - I think my build makes this pretty obvious!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: tassie48 on May 21, 2012, 10:24:47 am
Was a real trick to keep her on course we had a massive quadrant down aft to the rudder stock under some nice timber TEAK gratting was a real pleasure to serve on her had a coal range for cooking had to keep her hot all the time for hot water British Polar two stroke diesel as well a real ship to sail on slow and a happy ship now gone to the knackers yard keep up the great build looks like a good model tassie48
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 21, 2012, 05:00:48 pm
Thanks for the extra info. Tassie. I had the privilege of steering the VIC32 (as a passenger) about 15 years ago - a bit smaller than yours! These old vessels just ooze personality do they not. It's a shame that the VIC56 seems to be deteriorating a bit (probably short of money!). She must have had a grating across the stern at one time - the VIC32 has. I'm planning to make one out of teak for my Northlight - the white-metal one supplied with the kit could never look the part!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on January 23, 2013, 07:40:39 pm
Now, where were we? Eight months to report on - shouldn’t take too long! I remember debating ways of securing the end of the aerial vertically. In the end I decided on a hollow mast, so abandoned the wooden one and made another from acrylic tube.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01958.jpg)

The detachable top piece was a bit tricky.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01959.jpg)

Detail of the top (shows keying to prevent it twisting). End of aerial to be secured with piece of soft tubing.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02394-1.jpg)

The mast step  had already been mounted:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02941.jpg)

A support bock was glued beneath the deck:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02942.jpg)

To prevent the mast from twisting, it was keyed. A thin ply fillet was inserted:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02943.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02944.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02948.jpg)

And the mast slotted:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02950.jpg)

Complete:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02618.jpg)

At this stage, the bottlescrews were replaced with brass. Their gunwale plates were sleeved with stainless steel inserts and bolts made from 14 BA screws.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02837.jpg)

Then there was the boom to make heavy enough to fall reliably under its own weight but not to cause an embarrassing list when fully abeam. 7.5g was enough to ensure free fall in the mock up. A 10.5g weight was tried with the vessel in water and only produced a list of c. 3 deg. so this one was  chosen.

Useful selection of  ¼” rods:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02681.jpg)

Suspended needle used as pendulum to make measurements:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02642.jpg)

Shows deflection to port with 7.5g weight:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02643.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02647.jpg)

Now with 10.5g weight:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02659.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02661.jpg)

Boom mounted in the lathe:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02670.jpg)

Milled and drilled ¼”:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02671.jpg)

Weight epoxied in. (a small hole was drilled laterally at the bottom to let the air out when it was pushed in.)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02673.jpg)

Because the boom was going to be moving, a new gooseneck pivot was made and bearing surfaces sleeved with brass:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02676.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02679.jpg)

The above takes us to about July last year - next instalment coming soon!

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on January 24, 2013, 08:06:01 pm
I got to the point where I was about to fit the hatch coaming but then thought “better get the RC board sorted first” - more of that later!

Then I thought “better cut out the wash-ports first” - found the upper rubbing strake was too high compared with the deck. Asked the forum for advice - Tug Kenny said “then you do indeed have a problem.”

Then I thought “better check that the boom movements still work, now the mechanism is in the hull.”

Stage 1.    Threaded up the pulleys for lateral movement using some rough thread (on the basis that if it worked with that, it would be OK with decent thread). - Connected up servo to RX and tried it. Did it work? - Of course not! Thought “Oh bother” (or something very similar).

 After much head scratching (almost woke up the chap in the drawing office!) I discovered the reason was that the pulleys were not spinning freely enough (ironically because they were a bit too loose on the spindles and were being pulled out of alignment by the tensioning springs). Big problem! The spindles were brass rods soldered to plates epoxied  to the hull and now difficult to access under the deck.

The chap in the drawing office said the proper solution would be to use ball races - and the Internet revealed a source of very small reasonably priced ones (6mm diam. 2.5mm deep, bore 3mm). But how to make holes for a good press fit. Steamboat Phil was consulted at Warwick and came up with - “1/64th under.” The purchase of a 5/64th reamer (actually 0.05mm under) in combination with a tailor made anvil saw them pressed home in the lathe.

Backplate made to support pulley when in lathe chuck.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02970.jpg)

Milling out old bearing
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03062.jpg)

Reamed out to 5.95mm.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03065.jpg)

Insertion tool mounted in tailstock chuck.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03067.jpg)

Bearing mounted on insertion tool
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03058.jpg)

Ready to insert (pulley has been warmed).
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03059.jpg)

Success!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03060.jpg)

After a very ham-fisted removal of the original spindles, they were replaced with3mm threaded ones. Fine pitch was chosen as the plates are only 2.5 mm thick.

Making new spindle:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03068.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03072.jpg)

Cutting slots in heads:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03078.jpg)

Slotted.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03080.jpg)

Cut to length ready for assembly.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03083.jpg)

Old spindle.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03085.jpg)

Cut off.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03089.jpg)

Tapped 3mm (0.35mm pitch)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03101.jpg)

 Result success!!

Stage two coming very shortly!

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on January 25, 2013, 02:46:11 pm
As promised!

Stage 2.    Threaded up the pulley designed to maintain gentle tension on the secondary (dummy) boom lifting line. The original piece of shirring elastic, from it’s time in the mock-up, was still attached but time had taken it’s toll and it was no longer up to the job. A replacement length was taken from the original reel which promptly lost it’s elasticity after a single raising and lowering of the boom.
I thought “Oh bother (or something very similar).

Time to wake up the chap in the drawing office again. At the prototype stage,  he had me making intricate weighted pulley systems, which didn’t work, before deciding a very weak spring was needed.
This had a twofold result:
                                        a.)  An abortive search for a supplier and
                                        b.)  Ian Boatmadman telling me it’s easy to make your own. (complete with a link to a website explaining how to do it).
At the time, I opted for the shirring elastic (as recommended and purchased by the Management), which worked. But not permanently!!

So… the answer had to be a spring (no more than 6mm diam. c. 50mm long, extending to c. 95mm with a spring rate of < 0.02 N/mm). Once again, the Internet failed to satisfy (a few near misses but the main obstacle = cost of buying just one or two).

Ever since Ian posted the link, the chap in the drawing office had been pressing me to have a go and having a few metres of 0.3mm stainless steel wire in stock didn’t help. The thing that put me off was not having the wherewithal to anneal the result but, this time round, a very helpful chap from a spring  manufacturer told me not to bother. I have since learned that annealing doesn’t affect  “springiness” but extends the elastic limit.

So, it was worth a try! As I was going to need over 200 turns, I decided to use the lathe. Winding the wire onto a wooden reel proved successful in controlling the feed tension and  the result wasn’t too bad for a first attempt!

Lathe set up for winding (0.3mm pitch)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03111.jpg)

Wire secured ready to start. (Mandrel supported in sliding fit sleeve mounted in tailstock chuck.)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03114.jpg)

Finished. (Sorry about poor focus!)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03119.jpg)

Result: The mandrel was 2.37mm diam. and the spring expanded to 3.6mm.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03122.jpg)

After a bit of a battle to cut it and form end loops:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03130.jpg)

Mounted in hull. (Boom fully lowered, so stretched to 93mm.)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03134.jpg)

Boom fully raised. (Spring relaxed.)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03135.jpg)

 So far, so good! It maintains tension while the boom is fully raised and allows it to fall easily under it’s own weight. The acid test will come with the passage of time, because it is under maximum tension most of the time - i.e. when the boom is at rest.

Video to end - showing all the mechanical bits working! Apologies for poor focus!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV03138.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/?action=view&current=MOV03138.mp4)

Now, back to the wash-ports!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 05, 2013, 08:10:57 pm
Hindsight is a wonderful source of wisdom! If I knew then what I know now… the wash port saga would be very different.

I knew they were going to be too high with respect to the deck.
I knew the upper rubbing strake was going to be in the way.
But: I went ahead anyway!

In fairness to myself, I did contemplate scraping/filing off the offending strake but, after much deliberation, decided against this - on the basis that it would be very difficult to disguise the removal i.e. to get a polished surface and add rivets (without counting them of course!). Another factor was that, after going to a lot of trouble
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC01659_zps8d644727.jpg)
to pull the warped hull sides to a vertical plane, they have, to some extent, reverted to their warped state. I thought that removing the strake might make this worse.

So… herewith the outcome:

Stage1.    Gouge out hinge pin parts from the white metal cover castings and drill for 0.5mm replacements.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03166_zps14c6f761.jpg)

Stage 2.    Cut lengths of 0.5mm O.D. and 0.85mm O.D., 0.5mm I.D. SS tube to make hinges.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03142_zps863a61c0.jpg)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03143_zpse02655c4.jpg)

Stage 3.    Cut 2.5mm strips of 0.03mm brass shim for securing to hull.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03146_zpsbbe2c730.jpg)

Pieces of shim folded.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03147_zps36afbdf5.jpg)

Single cover fully assembled.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03152_zps3bedc453.jpg)

Stage 4.    Check function with mock-up.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03154_zpsaf55e874.jpg)

Video:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV03155_zpsb39f18b5.jpg) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV03155_zpsb39f18b5.mp4)


Stage 5.    Cut wash ports.

Stage 6.    Create 0.4mm slots for shim anchorage.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03159_zps60ed5954.jpg)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03160_zpsf39da796.jpg)

And finally! (Video)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV03165_zpsafaa0e12.jpg) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV03165_zpsafaa0e12.mp4)

The bottom inner edges of the covers will have to be chamfered as they sit on the rubbing strake. The hinges will not be secured in place (by glueing) until after painting.

It might be said that the result looks the part but I have a strong suspicion that experience on the water will result in the ports being sealed with pieces of clear acrylic sheet!

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 21, 2013, 08:17:01 pm
Having fitted the hatch coaming, the time had finally arrived to start painting! The weather, however, had other ideas. So… meanwhile, the r.c. tray needed sorting out.

It occurred to me that my previous diagram explaining the use of Action’s P44 units to operate the winch was a bit obscure:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC00784.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC00784.jpg.html)

So here is a better one:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/pfrcircdiag0001_zps6d8a170c.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/pfrcircdiag0001_zps6d8a170c.jpg.html)

The original connector:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02830_zps2b081a4a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02830_zps2b081a4a.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02841_zpsc2dbf4cf.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02841_zpsc2dbf4cf.jpg.html)

proved a pain to disconnect so a rummage through the storage system (rather unkindly called junk by the Management) produced this:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02828_zps2329016d.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02828_zps2329016d.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02829_zps2a7a3f2a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02829_zps2a7a3f2a.jpg.html)

The next pics show the relay:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02823_zps9222be23.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02823_zps9222be23.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02824_zps3bda5e36.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02824_zps3bda5e36.jpg.html)

And the complete winch circuitry:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02822_zps6e06a3f6.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02822_zps6e06a3f6.jpg.html)

The chap in the drawing office pointed out that, with the aerial mounted round the underside of the deck and going up inside the mast, removing the r.c. tray to get access below was going to cause a problem with the receiver (all the output leads would have to be yanked out). His underling thought that it would be much simpler if the aerial could be disconnected but was very reluctant to cut it. The chap in the drawing office suggested chopping up a “D” connector to get a gold plated pin and socket.

Result:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02978_zpsa3140e23.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02978_zpsa3140e23.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02961_zpsed21cbdc.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02961_zpsed21cbdc.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02974_zpsebe4e2cd.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02974_zpsebe4e2cd.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC02981_zps1a8fd43d.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC02981_zps1a8fd43d.jpg.html)

It was not possible to fit the socket within the receiver and it was felt the heatshrink  would help to keep it tight.

The plan is to finally secure the Rx and battery with cable ties.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03397_zpsd8b5999e.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03397_zpsd8b5999e.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03396_zpsfb071c8a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03396_zpsfb071c8a.jpg.html)

The positive leads from the batteries (Rx, Motor, Bilge pump) go to the fuses (0.8A, 2A, 0.8A respectively) and thence to two way switches with charging leads attached to the “off” terminals. (These were designed to be retractable but the two with silicone insulation don’t slide very easily!)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03399_zps631e77b3.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03399_zps631e77b3.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03400_zpsf2acdc0f.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03400_zpsf2acdc0f.jpg.html)

For testing purposes, two 2.5V bulbs were wired in series and connected to the Action P43 unit, using the Rx power supply rails as a supply. I shall have to weigh the power consumption of 6 LEDs (and how often they will be on) against the Rx battery duration. The alternative would be to use the bilge pump battery - assuming this will not be required to operate the pump!

As the Action P81 ESC had not been tried, it was time for a session in the test tank. The video appears to indicate that all went well:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV03395_zps503ef5cf.jpg) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV03395_zps503ef5cf.mp4)

BUT it revealed a problem of Titanic proportions! - see my cry for help post for the details.

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on November 06, 2013, 12:10:43 pm

Hey Mike!

 Any progress with your Puffer?    :-)
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 06, 2013, 04:49:52 pm
Hi Martin,

The short answer to your question is yes! The slightly longer answer is I'm getting even slower in my old age and I've been fiddling with some of the fittings ad nauseam. There will be some pictures appearing shortly.

The sailing at Wicksteed in May was very useful (and quite encouraging) but the reversing problem still needs further investigation. She is currently in a dismantled state as I decided it was time to start painting during the warmer weather.

Thanks for asking - hopefully we''ll see you on Saturday at Warwick.

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 26, 2013, 07:06:29 pm
Here we go. As promised, the next instalment.
After the “sea trial” at Wicksteed in May:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03410_zpsa8925a51.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03410_zpsa8925a51.jpg.html)

- the model was dismantled ready for painting (using Halford’s rattle can primers, grey, black and red).
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03947_zpsd077ca49.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03947_zpsd077ca49.jpg.html)

Very soon, it became apparent that more fittings needed to be mounted before going further, starting with the deckhouse doors.

It seems to me that almost every time I pick up a white metal fitting, it appears to be out of scale, is too heavy, needs modifying to make functional or replacing altogether (Note, so far, the steering wheel, turnbuckles and wash-port covers - not to mention the winch & steering mechanism!).

The deckhouse door hinges were no exception needing sleeves for the pins:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC03946_zps46405ccd.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC03946_zps46405ccd.jpg.html)

The sleeves were made by drilling 0.7mm holes in bits of 10 BA bolts.

The handles were deemed to be out of scale and unusable, which had the chap in the drawing office scribbling on various bits of paper for days:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04275_zpsd257ff89.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04275_zpsd257ff89.jpg.html)

The main problem being to allow adjustment for aligning the handle and catch without creating slack or tightness. (14 BA has a pitch of 0.23mm, so half a turn makes quite a difference.)

The starting point is two cheesehead 14 BA bolts with slots made half-round and two bits of 0.66mm wire for the handles:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04052_zps0c0b1eaf.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04052_zps0c0b1eaf.jpg.html)

The bits of wire were soldered onto the heads and trimmed down to 5mm.

The next picture shows the doors with hinges fitted and (on the left) the components of the latch - 14 BA nut, catch, curly piece of acrylic sheet as spring washer, sleeve to be glued into hole in door and 14 BA handle. On the right the latch is shown assembled.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04117_zps589cc510.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04117_zps589cc510.jpg.html)

And finally assembled:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04155_zps45d7e80a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04155_zps45d7e80a.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04232_zps126aaf7a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04232_zps126aaf7a.jpg.html)

The hinge pins were made from 0.66mm wire with mini collars soldered on at the top.

Coming soon - the saga of the portholes!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 28, 2013, 03:33:50 pm
And now for the portholes!

I must confess, this episode is so embarrassing I had decided not to include it - but then reminded myself that the main reason for posting this thread is that anyone reading it can learn from my mistakes.  O0

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04157_zps6fa71fdd.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04157_zps6fa71fdd.jpg.html)

I had cut holes to fit the white metal castings, planning to make brass replacements with the same diameter. However, the discovery that these could be bought from modelbox.info for 92p each (+£2.50 del.) resulted in a considerable saving in time and labour.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04158_zps8380caa5.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04158_zps8380caa5.jpg.html)

I felt that they needed to be removable as I did not intend to paint them and they might, at some stage, need re-glazing (the deckhouse walls are not removable because of the steering chain). Perhaps the most obvious fixings would be simulated rivets but the chap in the drawing office thought that securing them in the 1.5mm ply of the deckhouse wall might be difficult. The next thought was hex head bolts. As the holes in the rims were 1mm, 14 BA were considered but the heads were too big. (They looked too big and there was insufficient clearance to get a nut-spinner over them.) 16 BA ones were purchased and they looked OK.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04159_zps6efa228c.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04159_zps6efa228c.jpg.html)

Now for the problems!

The new portholes had a diameter of 14.9mm and the holes I had made for the castings were 15.9mm! My initial reaction to this was that I just needed to glue in an insert but this was when I was planning to use 14 BA bolts (and I have a 14 BA tap). When the 16 BA bolts arrived on the scene (and not having a 16 BA tap), there was nothing for it but to hand the problem over to the chap in the drawing office!

He designed a flanged sleeve to secure nuts on the inner surface - which, on paper, impressed his underling. All he had to do was make it - what could be simpler?

Acrylic material was chosen because it would form a solvent weld with superglue when embedding the nuts and would also make a good bond with the deckhouse wall. The lack of any round stock large enough meant wastefully turning down a rectangular block but hey-ho off we went. All a rather delicate operation but we managed to get a pair, each with six wells which were a gentle push fit for the nuts.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04160_zps9d01005d.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04160_zps9d01005d.jpg.html)

The next stage was significantly influenced by the fact that I am sensitive to superglue so I needed to glue the nuts in, keeping them aligned vertically, in the garden with a fan blowing  and keeping my nose at a safe distance!  :D A successful experimental run was performed with the nut held right at the end of a bolt and secured against a PTFE sleeve.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04230_zpsb7f39adc.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04230_zpsb7f39adc.jpg.html)

The bolt could be unscrewed from the embedded nut (i.e. hadn‘t got glued in!) so the main task was embarked upon. I started alternating between the rings and the first three went OK
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04252_zps4b605d4b.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04252_zps4b605d4b.jpg.html)

The fourth one, however, proved difficult to push in and the cyano was going off,  so I pushed harder and:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04253_zps9f00c5dd.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04253_zps9f00c5dd.jpg.html)

I thought “Oh bother” (or something very similar). Time for a rethink - which resulted in the thought: The problem would be easily solved if I had a 16 BA tap. My experience with small size taps has not been happy (I have three 12 BA taps, all of which produce over-sized holes - the worst being the one I paid most for). However, the 14 BA one, which was cheap, performs well so, after seeking permission from the Management, I bought a 16 BA jobbie from Eileen’s Emporium for £20 (+£4 p&p). It performs excellently!

So now, all I had to do was make a couple of spacer rings, glue them into the deckhouse walls, drill the holes and tap them out.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04235_zpsb9beb163.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04235_zpsb9beb163.jpg.html)

I had to make this little nut-spinner as a normal one is too chunky.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04164_zps79151261.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04164_zps79151261.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04251_zpsf193afcc.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04251_zpsf193afcc.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04254_zps15bd17e8.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04254_zps15bd17e8.jpg.html)

I know, I know - I can hear you asking “Why on earth didn’t he do it that way in the first place?”.  O0 I blame the chap in the drawing office - he definitely needs putting out to grass!

Coming shortly - an episode where everything went well!!!!!!  :o

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 29, 2013, 07:13:21 pm
And now the final episode of this stage in the build. I hope Martin is impressed with my current rate of posting!

 Quite simply, the mounting of the stern rails. (Nothing went wrong because there was virtually nothing that could!) I had actually cleaned up the stanchions and formed the wire into shape some time ago but delayed installation because of the need for free access to the deckhouse walls.

The old stern deck from the original mock-up came in very handy for bending the wire to the exact shape. I also drilled holes in this for the stanchions so I could ensure everything fitted.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04266_zps9d1a6a66.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04266_zps9d1a6a66.jpg.html)

I debated whether to cut the top rail and bend it down to the capping rail prior to gluing but decided against as I suspected fine adjustment would be needed, which would be easier when the wire was secure in the stanchions.

Because of the springiness of the wire, one or two of the stanchions tended to lift slightly, so I made a collection of weights to hold them all down firmly while the epoxy went off.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04264_zpsc4ac21be.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04264_zpsc4ac21be.jpg.html)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04260_zpsdd805798.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04260_zpsdd805798.jpg.html)

Why did this remind me of Australia?

And finally:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04272_zps0da927f3.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04272_zps0da927f3.jpg.html)

It's about time I started on the wheelhouse!

Mike

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Neil on November 29, 2013, 07:59:03 pm
lovely work.....novel way of setting the stanchions and rails. :-))
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 29, 2013, 08:23:01 pm
Thanks Neil

It comes of being a nutcase!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Norseman on November 30, 2013, 02:04:32 pm
I blame the chap in the drawing office - he definitely needs putting out to grass!

Mike, recent experiences in my underling role has shown I could really do with someone upstairs in the drawing office - even if only part time. Please send your chap here; there is plenty to do.

I am really enjoying reading your build.  :-))

Dave
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 30, 2013, 03:23:39 pm
Hi Dave

I'd love to send him to you (and I suspect the Management would be delighted with the arrangement!) but there is a snag - his underling is not quite the same without him!  ;D

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/chapindrwgoff_zps95b407d3.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/chapindrwgoff_zps95b407d3.jpg.html)

Regards,
               Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 26, 2014, 06:55:02 pm
 Time for another, long overdue, update!

 
Before embarking on the wheelhouse, I planned a little snippet just before Christmas. Neil had pointed out that the rudder stock on his Northlight had gone rusty.
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,41586.msg419664.html#msg419664 (http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,41586.msg419664.html#msg419664)
So, I replaced mine with brass but, just before posting, the computer decided to pop its clogs – resulting in the purchase of a laptop (with Windows 8  >>:-( ) and a very long and frustrating data retrieval exercise.

 
Firstly the rudder mod:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04278_zpsc366a537.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04278_zpsc366a537.jpg.html)

 
The wire pins were epoxied in.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04285_zps0d1e56b6.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04285_zps0d1e56b6.jpg.html)
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04295_zps29a3d012.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04295_zps29a3d012.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04295_zps29a3d012.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04295_zps29a3d012.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Now the wheelhouse:
I had to make it rectangular because of the route taken by the steering chain. The panels are a double skin of 1mm ply.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04509_zps21438029.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04509_zps21438029.jpg.html)

 
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 26, 2014, 07:00:48 pm
 So far, so good but, all the time the chap in the drawing office is thinking “what about the wiring for the LED's?” Mounting the resistors for these within the wheelhouse would allow a 2 pole connector. The initial idea was to mount them in a chart draw unit but then the external water-tank was chosen – which meant making a hollow one.

 
It seemed obvious that the door should be openable, which meant making hinges and knobs. It all looked fairly straightforward on paper:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04493_zpsbef22a47.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04493_zpsbef22a47.jpg.html)

 
Tools selected at commencement:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04492_zps6ad49589.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04492_zps6ad49589.jpg.html)

 
Work in progress:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04494_zps6f80c160.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04494_zps6f80c160.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04494_zps6f80c160.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04494_zps6f80c160.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04495_zps5945eaca.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04495_zps5945eaca.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04495_zps5945eaca.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04495_zps5945eaca.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04496_zps526e004b.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04496_zps526e004b.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04496_zps526e004b.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04496_zps526e004b.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04497_zps2b45b400.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04497_zps2b45b400.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04497_zps2b45b400.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04497_zps2b45b400.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04498_zpse79617d1.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04498_zpse79617d1.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04498_zpse79617d1.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04498_zpse79617d1.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04499_zpsf5982247.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04499_zpsf5982247.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04499_zpsf5982247.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04499_zpsf5982247.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04500_zps4e466c67.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04500_zps4e466c67.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04500_zps4e466c67.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04500_zps4e466c67.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04502_zpsf7422a20.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04502_zpsf7422a20.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04502_zpsf7422a20.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04502_zpsf7422a20.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04503_zps38c0c4d1.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04503_zps38c0c4d1.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04503_zps38c0c4d1.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04503_zps38c0c4d1.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04504_zps765f50a1.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04504_zps765f50a1.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04504_zps765f50a1.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04504_zps765f50a1.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04506_zps2855d57e.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04506_zps2855d57e.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04507_zps8145786c.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04507_zps8145786c.jpg.html)

 
Tools actually used:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04508_zps39de0c23.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04508_zps39de0c23.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04508_zps39de0c23.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04508_zps39de0c23.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
In the event, it proved very fiddly. Getting the door to hang properly was frustrating but led to a surprising discovery. I currently use Devcon 2 ton epoxy and this can be softened with a hot-air gun even after several days curing – which enabled minute adjustments of the hinges.

 
The first set of door knobs were a dismal failure. I had decided use a 16 BA spindle. As one cannot tap right to the bottom of a blind hole, I soldered nuts into the knobs but, following the clean up after soldering the catch in place, the knobs screwed for ever and epoxy failed to hold them on.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04531_zpsdc7c56df.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04531_zpsdc7c56df.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04531_zpsdc7c56df.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04531_zpsdc7c56df.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04645_zps4c06a035.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04645_zps4c06a035.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04645_zps4c06a035.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04645_zps4c06a035.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
I tapped the replacements right through, which solved the problem.

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04803_zps24775943.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04803_zps24775943.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04803_zps24775943.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04803_zps24775943.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04809_zps3a117527.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04809_zps3a117527.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04809_zps3a117527.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04809_zps3a117527.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04810_zps23481f5b.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04810_zps23481f5b.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04810_zps23481f5b.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04810_zps23481f5b.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04664_zps674ac500.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04664_zps674ac500.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04664_zps674ac500.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04664_zps674ac500.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 26, 2014, 07:11:29 pm
 The navigation LED's were super-glued onto short lengths of acrylic rod, tapped 10 BA so they could be secured to their shelves. They were wired with some wire-wrapping wire (0.25mm, 0.5mm OD) which has heat resisting insulation. Channels were cut into the inner skin to route the wires to the hole into the water-tank. Each of the lanterns was held in place with a single 16 BA screw.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04647_zps6aa74c8b.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04647_zps6aa74c8b.jpg.html)
 
Only the inner skin of the roof was glued in place so that the ceiling light LED could be mounted and wired. The outer skin is held in place using the centrally mounted vent.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04658_zpsa53bd932.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04658_zpsa53bd932.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04658_zpsa53bd932.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04658_zpsa53bd932.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
1K pots were used to adjust the brightness of the LED's.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04813_zps081041ad.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04813_zps081041ad.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04813_zps081041ad.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04813_zps081041ad.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04815_zps57a52fdc.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04815_zps57a52fdc.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04815_zps57a52fdc.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04815_zps57a52fdc.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Holding the wiring in place proved a bit tricky (I had hoped for a few dabs of aliphatic resin but had to apply it all along the runs).
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05440_zps156a1cb7.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05440_zps156a1cb7.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05440_zps156a1cb7.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05440_zps156a1cb7.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05446_zps5370cd63.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05446_zps5370cd63.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05446_zps5370cd63.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05446_zps5370cd63.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Stripping the insulation off the wire-wrapping wire evoked several utterances of “Oh bother!” - or something very similar. Several of them ended up shorter than intended – making the soldering a bit tricky!
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05491_zps82e1d307.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05491_zps82e1d307.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05491_zps82e1d307.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05491_zps82e1d307.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05494_zps49bb5116.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05494_zps49bb5116.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05494_zps49bb5116.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05494_zps49bb5116.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05495_zpsbc835b18.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05495_zpsbc835b18.jpg.html)

Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 26, 2014, 07:14:22 pm
 At an earlier stage, I had decided to avoid the problem of clouding plastic by using glass to glaze the windows and found a packet of largish cover slips in the loft. You won't be surprised to learn that “cutting” them to size took a bit of experimentation. In the end, success resulted from holding them in a jig made from thin card and stroking them with tip of the thinnest diamond coated needle file I could find. After several strokes of gentle pressure, they broke spontaneously along the scratch. Again, you won't be surprised to learn that this took a bit of practice – they are 0.16mm thick!

 
Whether they survive when in situ, remains to be seen – I won't be fitting them until later.

 
The staining and varnishing was done before the navigation lights were fitted and wired in. The local stores only had 'Dark Oak', 'Mahogany' or 'Antique Pine' – the latter 'Out of Stock'! I've had a tin of 'Burmese Teak' in stock for donkey's years, so experimented with this. After application and wiping off a lot of the colour with a cloth soaked in white spirit, I thought “That'll do”. It also soaked into the score lines to create a pseudo-planking effect – not brilliant but, once again, I thought “That'll do!”

 
I couldn't get any matt varnish locally, so used satin. This seemed appropriate for the “planked” sides but doesn't look right for the roof. (I have some 'Dullcote' on order.)
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05497_zps95a31996.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05497_zps95a31996.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05497_zps95a31996.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05497_zps95a31996.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05500_zps2013e709.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05500_zps2013e709.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05500_zps2013e709.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05500_zps2013e709.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
This leads me to the thorny subject of weathering! For example, is it best to put rust marks on the water tank before varnishing or after (when it would be easier to 'adjust' or change) – followed by a further coat when satisfied?

 
Most impressed with Darren's “Lady Bute” but I'm not up to his standard!

 
Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: DarrenCarter2 on July 27, 2014, 06:39:13 pm
Hi mate loving your build ur a brilliant engineer wish I had the skills u have to machine my own parts, love ur cabin as well looks good how u have done it :)

Did u have trouble with ur hull being wrapped mine was quite bad all so had to get my father to take my hull to work to skim the none needed parts off he works for BMW so has better tooling and space to do it,

I'm going to weather mine and rust mine and then varnish after I found only a few brands that do Matt varnish I brought 3 different types I'm going to do a test with each one before trying it on my puffer

Thank u for your compliment on my weathering and my lady bute she's slowly getting there I have a week off work now so I'm hopping to get cracking with her and hopefully get her done or atleast nearly done
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 27, 2014, 08:41:10 pm
Hi Darren

I'm no engineer - I used to be a biochemist! But thank you for your kind words.

Yes, my hull was badly warped but didn't need any bits skimmed off. It responded quite well to being tightly wrapped with strips of cloth and warmed with a hot air gun - my post of 05/04/13 (reply #210) has a picture. It needs to be slightly overdone as it tends to regain its original shape over the subsequent few days.

Amusingly a neighbour came in the other day and was horrified when I told her I was planning to put spots of bird poo on the roof!

Have a great week!

Regards,
               Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: DarrenCarter2 on July 28, 2014, 05:01:23 pm
Hi mate

Haha I was going to do that I have little seagulls that I was going to put one or two on the boat :)

Just to let you no I done 3 tests today with 3 different varnishes and the best one but Sod's law the most expensive one was humbrol Matt varnish spray it's number is 49 if that helps u finding it it only comes in 150ml cans but on my test it come out very well I have now done two coats on my hatch cover very happy with how it's come out :) hope this helps
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on July 28, 2014, 07:49:15 pm
Hi Darren

Thanks for the info about Humbrol varnish - it was on my list to try but everywhere seemed to be out of stock when I tried to order some. However, I have just successfully placed an order!

Lady Bute goes from strength to strength (car looks good too)! Hope your wife enjoyed the lasange  :-) .
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on August 23, 2014, 10:39:13 pm
 Before finishing the wheelhouse (i.e. glazing and fitting the interior), I decided to mount the lum and other bits and pieces on the deckhouse roof. As previously, I found myself struggling with the weight of the white metal castings so the steam escape pipe was replaced with aluminium and the ventilator hollowed out. The oil-drum proved difficult – I had no suitable sized tubing in stock. The chap in the drawing office thought it would be fun to make it from a piece of shim – making the ribs by scoring the back but his underling anticipated a very tricky soldering operation, so the idea was abandoned forthwith.
In the end, I resorted to turning down a substantial rectangular chunk of acrylic material. Holding it the lathe while forming the ridges and ribs proved a logistical headache and, once again, the chap in the drawing office proved useless. Yes, the handle of the drain cock did come off during the process and yes, I did make another one out of brass – the mind boggles!

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05502_zps1c7d1022.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05502_zps1c7d1022.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05502_zps1c7d1022.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05502_zps1c7d1022.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05504_zps273ca95d.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05504_zps273ca95d.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05504_zps273ca95d.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05504_zps273ca95d.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05506_zps4da4cfd1.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05506_zps4da4cfd1.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05506_zps4da4cfd1.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05506_zps4da4cfd1.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05514_zps901dd614.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05514_zps901dd614.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05514_zps901dd614.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05514_zps901dd614.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05515_zpsdf590585.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05515_zpsdf590585.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05515_zpsdf590585.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05515_zpsdf590585.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
I'm now struggling over what colour to paint the deckhouse. Caldercraft suggest “teak brown” but looking at umpteen puffer pictures, it seems 50:50 between brown and cream.
And another thing, I thought I might try my hand at a bit of air-brushing but can't get the Spraycraft SP20 (which came as a freebie when I re-subscribed to Model Boats) to work. Not only that, my son's Humbrol double action jobbie (not used for 25 years) produces an intermittent spray.
Never mind, I have a plentiful supply of paint brushes.
Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on August 24, 2014, 06:55:22 pm
A mini update on the tail end of yesterday's post.

The problem with the Spraycraft airbrush turns out to be a split in the connector of the siphon bottle.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05530_zps7661d651.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05530_zps7661d651.jpg.html)

And the problem with the Humbrol one is an internal air leak - which when it builds up, pushes a bubble back through the inlet. There is the possibility that an O-ring is missing - but if so, I think the leak would be more dramatic. It is more likely that the joint is an interference fit - which, like me, is showing its age!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on August 27, 2014, 08:16:31 pm
Another trivial update - sorry!  {:-{

Firstly the Spraycraft:

After trawling the net looking for a replacement siphon cap, it appears one would have to buy one for an Aztek airbrush. The problem was having to buy the glass jar too which, with postage, made it (in my opinion) unreasonably expensive.

This resulted in the chap in the drawing office getting involved.  :embarrassed: He thought that drilling a 0.4mm hole through the offending split and pulling it together with twisted wire would be the answer. His underling duly drilled the hole but it was immediately apparent that this solution would not be up to the task. So, a suitable washer was selected and, after applying a spot epoxy, was jammed onto the nozzle. (The wire option was also applied for good measure.)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05538_zpsa83733ee.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05538_zpsa83733ee.jpg.html)

Result: One working airbrush!  ;D

And now for the other one.

I decided that an O-ring was worth a try and a rummage through the collection revealed one small enough. There was the possibility that it would occlude the air inlet but in the event this was not the case.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05534_zps3f4e2d2a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05534_zps3f4e2d2a.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05535_zpsbb81662f.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05535_zpsbb81662f.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05536_zps08925a9c.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05536_zps08925a9c.jpg.html)

Result another working airbrush!  O0

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 21, 2014, 08:12:27 pm
First of all let me say this posting this update has proved very frustrating!  O0   I tried two word processing packages (I no longer have the one I used to use in Windows XP) and in both cases the tabbing went awry when copying into the forum. To add insult to injury, the last experimental download posted itself spontaneously - much to my embarrassment!  :embarrassed:   So here it is with no tabs, only spaces. It appears impossible to edit in a tab (or spaces) at the beginning of a line. I'm getting too old!



A progress report on the weathering.

I had anticipated that this was going to be a challenge and, to date, things are going as badly as could be expected.

Two factors have had a surprising influence on the situation.

1.     Getting the 25 year old airbrush to work and finding that, even in my novice hands, it produces a much better result than hand brushing.
2.     The weather. I had assumed that I had missed the summer window of opportunity for spraying outdoors but Autumn held off for several weeks!

The sequence of events is as follows:

1.     I wanted to produce a bleached (but dirty) effect on the ply sheets supplied for the decks. After several disappointing attempts, I settled for diluted white Humbrol enamel, followed by powdered graphite with the excess removed with a wad dampened with white spirit.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05600_zps0cd55272.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05600_zps0cd55272.jpg.html)

2.     Before gluing these in place, the deck-house needed painting. I decided against Caldercraft's suggestion of 'Teak Brown' in favour of Humbrol Cream (103). After masking, diluting the paint 50:50 with white spirit and applying three coats (on successive sunny days), I was satisfied with the result.

3.     After a lot of fiddly masking, I sprayed the stern railings white (this time with a Halfords rattle can).
4.     There followed a brief interlude while the bilge pump outlet was made. (The outlet is directed downwards to avoid the fire-hose effect if it should need to operate.)

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05640_zps43a48fa9.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05640_zps43a48fa9.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05634_zps2f2fe36a.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05634_zps2f2fe36a.jpg.html)

5.     All was now ready for the application of a rust coloured wash. I had experimented previously on a test surface, using a brush and found that a 1 in 6 dilution looked OK. Because air-brushing goes on very thinly, I made a 1 in 5 dilution of Humbrol 'Rust' (113). It took all morning to mask off everything but the hull and stern railings. After spraying, it was left overnight to dry. When the masking was removed the following day, a passing Mrs Corposant was heard to remark, “That doesn't look like rust!” Not being too discouraged at this stage, I wiped off the excess with a rag soaked in white spirit – just leaving the crevices etc. Mrs Corposant then made a further comment: “It still doesn't look like rust, it's pink!” It was one of those rare moments of total matrimonial harmony – I completely agreed with her! A scan of  the Humbrol colour chart in search of something browner revealed 'German Red Brown' (160) which, in turn, led to a trip to the local toy shop. All the masking had been removed and the temperature was dropping, so I decided to apply the new colour (also diluted 1 in 5) using a brush and this time, I included the deck-house. After leaving overnight, the result looked much darker than before – not surprising because the brush had deposited more paint.

Now for the creation of a very unhappy Corposant! You may have noticed that the purpose of most of my posts is that anyone reading them can learn from my mistakes – and this one is no exception!

I armed myself with a piece of rag soaked in white spirit and started to wipe off the excess brown from the railings – only it didn't happen! After trying several different solvents, white spirit in combination with a mild abrasive pad eventually removed the brown. The snag was that, by the time I had removed enough brown, the white had come off too!  Just to rub salt in the wound, the colour was actually what I was looking for.

Now for the hull. If I had been sensible, I would have used vertical brush-strokes and mopped off the excess immediately. In my defence, the ease with which the air-brushed coat wiped away, led me into a false sense of security. Now, however, I was faced with hours of wiping with white spirit and abrasive getting rid of the excess (and in particular, the horizontal brush-strokes).

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05641_zps4f2cb213.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05641_zps4f2cb213.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05642_zpsd773762d.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05642_zpsd773762d.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05646_zps087f1e90.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05646_zps087f1e90.jpg.html)

After two very long sessions, the hull doesn't look too bad,

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05657_zpsf6a6d00b.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05657_zpsf6a6d00b.jpg.html)

although there are one or two spots where the underlying red shows through the black.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05649_zps30927658.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05649_zps30927658.jpg.html)

The deck-house, however, looked a most peculiar colour

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05653_zps2207b5ef.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05653_zps2207b5ef.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05654_zps5c4ca5e7.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05654_zps5c4ca5e7.jpg.html)

and has had to be re-painted, together with the stern rail. Not only that, the weather broke and it had to be done by brush.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05658_zpse293fe83.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05658_zpse293fe83.jpg.html)

6.     Another problem occurred during this sorry saga. In manipulating the model to get at the deck-house sides for painting (and in particular poking a brush through the railings to get at hinges and fittings etc.), I managed to dislodge the front ends of the top rail from their anchorage in the bulwark capping.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05663_zpsfcd8cd0f.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05663_zpsfcd8cd0f.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05669_zps09b8b016.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05669_zps09b8b016.jpg.html)

With the benefit of hindsight, I realised I had made a fundamental error when gluing in the stanchions – I had left bending down the ends until afterwards.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC04264_zpsc4ac21be.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC04264_zpsc4ac21be.jpg.html)

This meant that the anchor points were too shallow and the inevitable sequel was that the first stanchion on the port side broke, then the second and finally, the first on the starboard side became loose. I thought “Oh bother.” – or something very similar. The chap in the drawing office suggested drilling holes up into the broken ones and fitting new spigots followed by cutting off the rail ends that had come adrift, drilling half way through the top balls of the stanchions and gluing in longer lengths of wire whose distal ends could be firmly embedded into the bulwark capping. His underling thought these were a silly ideas and favoured scrapping the lot and starting again with brass stanchions – this time bending the top rail ends down before gluing. He did, however, at this stage call to mind the couple of spares in the kit. Then, while driving along the A303 for a few day's break in Exmouth, the chap in the drawing office had an idea for anchoring the existing ends more securely – bash them flat and bolt them in place.

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05833_zps35738f4e.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05833_zps35738f4e.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05836_zps317bdfbb.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05836_zps317bdfbb.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05820_zps21fbdb3b.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05820_zps21fbdb3b.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05829_zps68d12c52.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05829_zps68d12c52.jpg.html)

Secured with a 16BA bolt:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05843_zpsf85fd83b.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05843_zpsf85fd83b.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05840_zpsfe0f4eb6.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05840_zpsfe0f4eb6.jpg.html)

7.     I haven't got here yet!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on February 22, 2015, 04:58:22 pm
 The last update had me moaning about text formatting and weathering set-backs. Please accept my apologies! Our 12yr old grandson gave me some scenic rust for my birthday – so I'm hoping to do better in future!

Meanwhile, here are some current pics:

Binnacle bits.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05972_zpsb24ba3bc.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05972_zpsb24ba3bc.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05972_zpsb24ba3bc.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05972_zpsb24ba3bc.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

You will notice that the chap in the drawing office made me hollow it out and put an LED in it!

In situ:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05979_zpsbd583a78.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05979_zpsbd583a78.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC05979_zpsbd583a78.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC05979_zpsbd583a78.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

Spot the difference!
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06068_zpse2e0086d.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06068_zpse2e0086d.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06068_zpse2e0086d.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06068_zpse2e0086d.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06077_zpseb921d7a.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06077_zpseb921d7a.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06077_zpseb921d7a.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06077_zpseb921d7a.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

Yes – the voice pipe has a removeable plug/whistle! Who will ever know? You couldn't make it up!

I am greatly indebted to Howard Q for asking about the colour of side light boards and for the answer by Jerry C.

http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49950.msg508989.html#msg508989 (http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,49950.msg508989.html#msg508989)

So, a couple of dabs of paint to create a pre 1972 model:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06115_zps2ebf7d7a.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06115_zps2ebf7d7a.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06115_zps2ebf7d7a.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06115_zps2ebf7d7a.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06116_zpsb6cb3279.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06116_zpsb6cb3279.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06116_zpsb6cb3279.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06116_zpsb6cb3279.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

and one or two more:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06122_zpsd738cef9.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06122_zpsd738cef9.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06122_zpsd738cef9.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06122_zpsd738cef9.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06120_zps426c841f.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06120_zps426c841f.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06120_zps426c841f.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06120_zps426c841f.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06134_zps48f182df.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06134_zps48f182df.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06134_zps48f182df.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06134_zps48f182df.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on April 03, 2015, 08:12:12 pm
 A trivial update – while waiting for the weather to warm up enough for spraying.

 
I had been putting off mounting the horizontal steering chain blocks. The reason being that I designed them to be secured with 10 BA nuts and, for this pair, access below the deck was going to be extremely limited.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06344_zpsunbdkrgk.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06344_zpsunbdkrgk.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06344_zpsunbdkrgk.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06344_zpsunbdkrgk.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06349_zpsmty9mumv.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06349_zpsmty9mumv.jpg.html)

 
Mrs Corposant said “Why don't you just glue them in place?” This, of course, would have been the sensible thing to do! However, in my experience, it is extremely rare for something that has been fixed never to need un-fixing at a later date.

 
So, this device was fabricated:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06328_zpsekn3hqn3.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06328_zpsekn3hqn3.jpg.html)
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06332_zps55dwgz8d.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06332_zps55dwgz8d.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06332_zps55dwgz8d.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06332_zps55dwgz8d.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06337_zpspibxcomg.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06337_zpspibxcomg.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06337_zpspibxcomg.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06337_zpspibxcomg.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
It enabled the nut to be positioned under the hole in the deck and the block screwed onto it. The length of spring enabled the nut to be twizzled tight.

 
View, using mirror, showing the port side hole.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06360_zpss4t76rrb.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06360_zpss4t76rrb.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06360_zpss4t76rrb.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06360_zpss4t76rrb.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
and the block secured - including a locknut!
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06389_zpsaixrk5ey.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06389_zpsaixrk5ey.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06389_zpsaixrk5ey.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06389_zpsaixrk5ey.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06398_zps0o3ojpe5.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06398_zps0o3ojpe5.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06398_zps0o3ojpe5.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06398_zps0o3ojpe5.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06400_zpsuqkbkofw.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06400_zpsuqkbkofw.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06400_zpsuqkbkofw.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06400_zpsuqkbkofw.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
The stage is now set for re-installing the steering mechanism – which, in turn, highlights the need for the rudder stem to be removable (so that the prop-shaft can be withdrawn when maintenance calls).
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06401_zpstsc6jvvf.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06401_zpstsc6jvvf.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06401_zpstsc6jvvf.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06401_zpstsc6jvvf.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Our grandson's rust seems to work well, although I have found it needs careful judgement to avoid overdoing it.

 
Before going any further with the weathering, I need to apply the decals. They appear to be the waterslide type (I've never done this before!) and I'm hoping they go on as words rather than individual letters!

 
Mike

 
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on October 31, 2015, 09:26:01 pm
 The current sequence of events:
The weathering,by and large, went well – one can set up practice pieces and experiment. It is easy to overdo it.
I had no experience of applying decals, so searched the Net and, from the large amount of advice (often conflicting!), opted to use white vinegar in place of “Microset” (which was said to smell of acetic acid) and the result showed a slight amount of “silvering” but I assumed the addition of a few extra rust spots and a coat of matt varnish would camouflage this. (But vide infra.)
I have to say, having also sought advice from this forum, that “Stan” is your man when it comes to sound counsel on such matters. Sadly his response came after I had “done it my way”. With the benefit of hindsight, I would use Microset, as recommended by Stan. The decals being fifteen years old may have been a factor in all this – Jotika say they can supply replacements.

 
Before varnishing the decks and superstructure, I decided to mount the fittings on the foc'sle, starting with the companionway. There followed a lengthy period of conflict between the chap in the drawing office and Mrs Corposant He contemplated the block of wood supplied and thought, “You can't just stick this on”. She kept saying, over the next few weeks of the underling's frustrations, “Why don't you just stick on the block that came with the kit?”

 
The chap in the drawing office thought it would be interesting to give it doors and a sliding roof section. Making it removable would enable it to be made “on the bench”. To prevent it being easily washed overboard, it was given a deep box section (which could be used as a mini storage area).
His deliberations went something like this:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07799_zpswrij9zlm.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07799_zpswrij9zlm.jpg.html)
Thin brass was chosen for the sliding cover and wood veneer for the fixed area (on the basis that the latter could be easily bent and glued). The chap in the drawing office then went into overdrive trying to think of a way of preventing the sliding cover from falling open. Obviously some form of spring was needed and, after a multitude of rejected ideas, the decision was made on the basis of being simple to make, not able to fall out and freedom from corrosion. Hence thin stainless steel wire.
The door hinges were of simpler design than those of the wheelhouse door and mounted within the structural layers (glued into the doors and push fit into side walls).


First stage.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07212_zpsy5zlvv5w.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07212_zpsy5zlvv5w.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07215_zpsntm18tpr.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07215_zpsntm18tpr.jpg.html)
Veneer.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07216_zpskiwy3xf2.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07216_zpskiwy3xf2.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07221_zps3fiy80i8.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07221_zps3fiy80i8.jpg.html)
Showing slots for hinges.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07713_zpsbnevm0xi.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07713_zpsbnevm0xi.jpg.html)
Showing slits for springs.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07734_zpsw3huhdqz.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07734_zpsw3huhdqz.jpg.html)
Final spring design.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07716_zpsxnlxkzct.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07716_zpsxnlxkzct.jpg.html)
Showing springs in place.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07727_zpshgzknghh.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07727_zpshgzknghh.jpg.html)
Hinges.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07721_zpsjojsnbts.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07721_zpsjojsnbts.jpg.html)
Doors.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07729_zps5uaniw2u.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07729_zps5uaniw2u.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07731_zpsurifebqe.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07731_zpsurifebqe.jpg.html)
Doors with hinges in place.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07738_zps1tde2gcz.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07738_zps1tde2gcz.jpg.html)
Edge strips formed by bending 0.8mm ply.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07736_zpsw1vubogz.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07736_zpsw1vubogz.jpg.html)
Finished.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07792_zpskewubhbp.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07792_zpskewubhbp.jpg.html)
Showing spring.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07795_zpsbhozzd9n.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07795_zpsbhozzd9n.jpg.html)
In situ.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07782_zpsvqhahbzi.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07782_zpsvqhahbzi.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07784_zpsapgquthw.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07784_zpsapgquthw.jpg.html)

 
The passage of time (a lot of time!) since applying matt varnish to the hull has revealed an interesting phenomenon. No change to the stern decals but those on the bows now show significant silvering and the varnish has lifted in a band below them. It looks as if something used on the decals has run down and affected the adhesion of the varnish – but all I used was water and white spirit (which were also used on the stern).

 
Pictures taken  22nd May.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06615_zpskt3dvkjc.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06615_zpskt3dvkjc.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC06631_zpsnd0awgek.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC06631_zpsnd0awgek.jpg.html)
Pictures taken 4th October.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07709_zpsou6f42hb.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07709_zpsou6f42hb.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07710_zpsllx6bllo.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07710_zpsllx6bllo.jpg.html)

 
Next instalment: The chap in the drawing office is thinking ahead!

 
Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on January 03, 2016, 08:42:23 pm
 As promised, the chap in the drawing office has been thinking ahead. Every picture tells a story!


Wherewithal for a level footing:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07809_zpswvpwomap.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07809_zpswvpwomap.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07809_zpswvpwomap.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07809_zpswvpwomap.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07824_zpswxcecvqy.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07824_zpswxcecvqy.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC07824_zpswxcecvqy.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC07824_zpswxcecvqy.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Regretted using teak – not easy to work at this scale!
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08071_zps8b5fo1qr.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08071_zps8b5fo1qr.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08071_zps8b5fo1qr.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08071_zps8b5fo1qr.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Yes, it's going to be bucket & chuck it!
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08085_zpsbehc2lvo.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08085_zpsbehc2lvo.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08085_zpsbehc2lvo.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08085_zpsbehc2lvo.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08117_zps6t85isxo.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08117_zps6t85isxo.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08117_zps6t85isxo.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08117_zps6t85isxo.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Bending the back to shape was a bit tricky.
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08130_zps5tuysvbq.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08130_zps5tuysvbq.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08130_zps5tuysvbq.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08130_zps5tuysvbq.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08135_zpscrpgddzi.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08135_zpscrpgddzi.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08135_zpscrpgddzi.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08135_zpscrpgddzi.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
Trimmed up:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08141_zpsryv8b9r4.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08141_zpsryv8b9r4.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08141_zpsryv8b9r4.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08141_zpsryv8b9r4.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08145_zpsd8fflacq.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08145_zpsd8fflacq.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08145_zpsd8fflacq.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08145_zpsd8fflacq.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08159_zpshkwxvgtx.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08159_zpshkwxvgtx.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08159_zpshkwxvgtx.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08159_zpshkwxvgtx.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08194_zpstqdruyzq.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08194_zpstqdruyzq.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08194_zpstqdruyzq.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08194_zpstqdruyzq.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08200_zpsq78jdn1t.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08200_zpsq78jdn1t.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08200_zpsq78jdn1t.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08200_zpsq78jdn1t.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]

 
In situ:
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08231_zpsjjhphje0.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08231_zpsjjhphje0.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08231_zpsjjhphje0.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08231_zpsjjhphje0.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]
http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08232_zpseu8ssc6s.jpg.html](http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08232_zpseu8ssc6s.jpg)[/URL (http://[url=http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08232_zpseu8ssc6s.jpg.html%5D%5BIMG%5Dhttp://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08232_zpseu8ssc6s.jpg%5B/IMG%5D%5B/URL)]


I wonder what the chap in the drawing office has in mind now? - Not a lot!
 
Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Peter Fitness on January 03, 2016, 09:39:09 pm
Beautiful work Mike, I love the attention to detail O0  I hope you're not going to model the contents of that bucket :o {-)


Peter.
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on January 03, 2016, 10:56:10 pm
Hi Peter,

I must confess it had crossed my mind  :embarrassed: - but fortunately only briefly!

The chap in the drawing office keeps nagging me to add some bits of newspaper hanging on a string and a lantern (for night-time visits) but these will be tricky at 1:32 so will have to wait til later - much later!

A very happy new year to you!

Regards,
               Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 15, 2016, 07:09:24 pm
 A few more trivial bits:


The winch has been in bits since July 2013 – ready for painting! I had sprayed it with primer but it needed brushing, so it could be done indoors and I have finally got round to it.


I had got fed up with the reversing lever getting bent, so the first stage was to cut it off and make a brass replacement.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08243_zpsh5bxznqc.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08243_zpsh5bxznqc.jpg.html)

 Painting completed:

(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08253_zpsj4q7sq4u.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08253_zpsj4q7sq4u.jpg.html)
 
Fortunately I had taken some pics when I dismantled it!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08613_zpsqdhz9tuo.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08613_zpsqdhz9tuo.jpg.html)
 
And it went back together without too much trouble.
 
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08321_zpsidclf14u.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08321_zpsidclf14u.jpg.html)(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08322_zpszhcpvpll.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08322_zpszhcpvpll.jpg.html)
 
And it still works!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV08281_zps1tqjpabx.mp4) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV08281_zps1tqjpabx.mp4)
 
It was not anticipated that the galley flue would present any problems – so here they are!
Firstly, it was going to have to be removable – because the winch is removable and comes out with a twisting motion. A bayonet fitting was designed to facilitate this.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08333_zpsmqpndkiz.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08333_zpsmqpndkiz.jpg.html)
 
Secondly, using the aluminium supplied was not a success (at least not in my hands!). It's softness made it difficult to make neat joints. Epoxy failed to hold them together!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08328_zpsukqx4y37.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08328_zpsukqx4y37.jpg.html)
 
The third problem – a bit trivial this – no brass tubing of the right size in stock. I had to buy some!
Fourth problem – creating joints tight enough for soldering in thin wall tubing. At last, something for the chap in the drawing office to get his teeth into!
Result:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08526_zps7rakw6im.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08526_zps7rakw6im.jpg.html)
 
Success:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08532_zps6yatdoxq.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08532_zps6yatdoxq.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08555_zpsrzvekww8.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08555_zpsrzvekww8.jpg.html)
Painted and in situ:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08561_zpsg5w8omlo.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08561_zpsg5w8omlo.jpg.html)
 
Time now to re-assemble the steering mechanism. I decided to simplify it by dispensing with a couple of pulleys and making a new servo arm. (With the old one, the chain went a bit slack on the non-pulled side at each extremity – so springs were added.)
I started to make a set of shackles, got fed up because it was proving very fiddly and taking too long  so ordered some from Component Shop – which were very well made. The snag now was that, while waiting for them to arrive (24 hrs!), I finished making my own and so was faced with the dilemma of choosing which to use!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08581_zpsv3gvrmzt.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08581_zpsv3gvrmzt.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08583_zpsgpyoyxol.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08583_zpsgpyoyxol.jpg.html)
 
In the end, I chose the homemade.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08601_zpsmdojy4mb.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08601_zpsmdojy4mb.jpg.html)
 
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV08598_zpsybphlotv.mp4) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV08598_zpsybphlotv.mp4)
 
At this rate, I'll be bringing her up to Wicksteed!!
Mike

 
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Martin [Admin] on May 15, 2016, 08:40:11 pm
 
 Work of art sir!   O0
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 15, 2016, 10:51:21 pm
Very kind of you to say so, Martin - but I think your trip to Specsavers is overdue!  O0

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: derekwarner on May 15, 2016, 11:03:25 pm
A true inspiration in what can be achieved in scale Mike :-))

Have been back to post #1 :o... but cannot see the reference to the number of turns on the steering wheel drum......I tried to count them, but the speed is too quick

Have you considered some sort of slowdown for the servo drum?

Again congratulations on brilliant scale detail converted to realism  ...... Derek
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 16, 2016, 12:13:28 am
Hi Derek

The steering wheel drum has always had a diameter of 6mm. There have been two or three changes to the servo arm (length and shape!) and the current arrangement turns the wheel approx. 2 1/2 turns end to end (1 1/4 centre to port or starboard). Control on the water seemed OK when I took her to Wicksteed a couple of years ago (apart from going astern!  :D ) so I don't think a change in servo speed will be needed. I think your problem with counting the turns was because the servo is jittering badly - and ferrite beads don't seem to help.  :((

Thank you for your kind words (although my pedanticism evokes very different comments from Mrs Corposant!).

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: derekwarner on May 16, 2016, 01:43:52 am
Interesting Mike.....when I re watch the video...I count approx. 4 + a bit seconds from hard over to hard over, however from hard over to mid ships is quicker that 1/2 of the  4+ a bit <*<

As you say. may be the jittery servo....... but this is only watching in detail...I am sure on the water such matter would pale into insignificance  %)

Another question with regard to safety.....is the steering chain of fused link construction?.....have you established the breaking load for the chain?.....

Derek
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on May 16, 2016, 10:49:59 am
Derek

Another factor is the poor focus of the video!

The steering chain is fused link silver (obtained from a jewelry supplier). No, I haven't assessed the breaking load - how can I live with myself?  :o
It is attached to the springs with elongated hooks made from 0.6mm brass wire. The springs seem to cope with the task in hand!  O0

I did make the mistake of painting the chain, to give a rusty/oily effect - big mistake! It took ages to loosen the links enough to get it running freely through the pulley wheels - I should have just left it to tarnish!

Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 26, 2016, 09:00:39 pm
 The trip to Wicksteed went well.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08791_zpsbhj3pjdl.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08791_zpsbhj3pjdl.jpg.html)
The temporary thread used for the slewing guys, which had survived the rigors of development for the last four years, decided to give up the ghost just before Martin arrived to take some  action shots!
The video shows the moment it parted!
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/th_MOV08773_zpsijjmqn5e.mp4) (http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/MOV08773_zpsijjmqn5e.mp4)


July saw me thinking “I really must have a go at using the Sylmaster casting kit” - a Christmas present from two years ago! I had long felt that the white metal crew members, although good castings, were too heavy. Keeping a weather eye open for resin equivalents failed to meet my requirements.
The first stage went well, only requiring a trip to the local charity shop for some Lego and following the instructions.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08885_zpsrfndqdds.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08885_zpsrfndqdds.jpg.html)
Fitting the moulds together with inlets and outlets proved a bit tricky. The first attempt, using just rubber bands to avoid distortion, produced an excess of flash. Bubbles were also a problem.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08882_zpsoggiypdj.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08882_zpsoggiypdj.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08896_zpss2kysghe.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08896_zpss2kysghe.jpg.html)
Using metal plates and higher pressure solved the flash problem and a more sophisticated inlet and outlet system reduced the number and size of the bubbles.
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08890_zpspudsbfvd.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08890_zpspudsbfvd.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08894_zps34dukvld.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08894_zps34dukvld.jpg.html)


However, the increased pressure resulted in distortion! After several attempts, usable results were obtained. In all this, my biggest problem was the resin going off in about 45 seconds – and I don't do fast!! The bubbles were filled with Milliput (which included fashioning new thumbs!).


(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC08919_zpsipbpndth.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC08919_zpsipbpndth.jpg.html)
My attention now turned to the hatch cover.
Unfortunately the piece of material supplied with the kit was wide enough but slightly too short. It also seemed too stiff and I didn't like the colour. I am indebted to Barriew for his idea of using a cotton handkerchief instead (dyed olive green).


http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,9767.25.html
Reply #29


(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09478_zpsldxbauob.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09478_zpsldxbauob.jpg.html)
Decided on a timber load:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09472_zpsyfgesucv.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09472_zpsyfgesucv.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09501_zps6touru9s.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09501_zps6touru9s.jpg.html)
The printed deck lights had always bothered me so I inserted pieces of microscope slide:
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09495_zps4tfvlfhp.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09495_zps4tfvlfhp.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09497_zpscmah9pin.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09497_zpscmah9pin.jpg.html)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09508_zpstc1ks2ek.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09508_zpstc1ks2ek.jpg.html)


Finally, the saga of the skipper's right trouser leg.
Painting the crew started with a coat of Halfords grey primer. I must confess the skipper's cap and jacket seemed a bit implausible for a Clyde Puffer – perhaps he has delusions of grandeur! The picture shows my choice of colours (Humbrol enamel). There is however an exception – the skipper's trousers. I liked the primer's shade of grey and had no Humbrol equivalent, so I decided no further coat was needed.
The final application was a diluted black wash, mostly brushed off with white spirit when just dry.
The weather by now was cold but I felt I could get away with a coat of matt varnish. With the spray can in the airing cupboard, the figures were set up in the greenhouse, resting on a piece of kitchen roll. After spraying the backs, they were put immediately in the airing cupboard. All went well and when dry, the process was repeated with the figures facing the spray. This time things did not according to plan. I got the spray can a bit too close and therefore added rather too much varnish. Not only that, they fell over! This led to the discovery that Rust-oleum matt clear coat dissolves Halfords primer, with the result that the skipper's right trouser leg ended up with a bare patch. I thought “Oh bother” (or something very similar).
Undaunted, I set about removing the varnish from his leg. Alternate washings with IPA and white spirit seemed to do the trick. After capturing some of the primer in a pot, I brushed a new coat onto the denuded area. After drying, a dark wash was applied as before. However, this time  there was a delay, it got too hard and his right trouser leg was much too dark. Trying to remove the excess resulted in – yes, you guessed it – wiping off areas of the primer. I thought “Oh bother” (or something very similar).


The third attempt went according to plan!


Every picture tells a story (but this one has hidden depths!)
(http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad338/photomultiplier/DSC09859_zpso923jsj2.jpg) (http://s949.photobucket.com/user/photomultiplier/media/DSC09859_zpso923jsj2.jpg.html)


Mike

 
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Tug-Kenny on November 27, 2016, 10:42:50 am

Terrific work.   Well done.      :-))

I am into painting little figures and can never do a realistic looking job. My colour always looks too rich.  Thanks for the tips.

ken
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 27, 2016, 02:15:28 pm
Thanks Ken

You're probably like me - finding the old eyesight is not what it was! I certainly found the eyes a bit tricky. By the time I got the brush to the pupil the paint had dried! In the end I found a finely sharpened cocktail stick, pre-wetted with white spirit, worked best.

Curiously, I have found acrylics to dry even faster - which, being water-based, surprizes me. (And, as I pointed out, I don't do fast!)
I also find acrylic colours a bit bright for many small scale modelling applications - but obviously opinions vary on this!

Regards,
               Mike
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: ballastanksian on November 27, 2016, 07:55:50 pm
You can always dull paint down either by mixing another colour into the paint or as you did by applying a wash or drybrushing a lighter coat of the original colour on top. Reds are horible to wether as they tend to go over pink in places (assuming you don't want fading as opposed to colour graduation).

I learnt recently that adding some grey to yellow improves its coverage and also takes some of the brilliance out of it. I read it in last month's Military Modelling I beleive.

Your figures came out really nicely and the efforts to get the trousers right despite everything ganging up on you worked great!
Title: Re: Caldercraft Northlight Puffer with working Derrick Crane
Post by: Corposant on November 27, 2016, 09:19:40 pm
Hi Ballasttanksian

Thanks for your wise words about paint - sounds like the voice of experience!  O0

I must admit the skipper's trouser leg has made me the subject of much leg-pulling by the family!  {-)

Regards,
               Mike