Model Boat Mayhem

Dry Dock / Shipyard: Builds & Questions => Yachts and Sail => Topic started by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 11:46:29 AM

Title: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 11:46:29 AM
 First a little background- Brixham home of the ubiquitous sailing trawler a few of which still survive to this day. The fisherfolk of Brixham back in the mid 1800ís always on the lookout for newer fishing grounds gradually spread around the coasts of the UK.
Slowly making their way up the east coast they put in at Lowestoft, Hull, Grimsby and as far as Scarborough. The locals on seeing this type of craft were not slow to copy and order craft of their own to the same style. Sadly the Humber variant no longer exists, only as one line drawing in a book called Homes of the Humber , Homes among other things being a small craft (zuluís) sailor. From the contents of the book the boat was almost identical to the original Brixham craft but being 10-15 feet longer and 1 ft deeper draft to give them more sea room. The boats of the south coast running for safe harbour in foul weather whereas the east coast men would stay out at sea. More in depth reading on all the variants from Brixham up the east coast to Scarborough, both about the craft, their crews and their owners can be read in Edgar J Marchís book-Sailing Trawlers, good luck if you can find a copy anywhere for less than a £100. It was written  just after WW2 and has been out of print since 1970 but is a fascinating read! Interestingly the sailing smack rose to prominence and disappeared very quickly from nothing around 1870 to over 300 registered in Hull by 1890. Then in the next 10 years had just as quickly disappeared to be replaced by steam, so 30 years was the golden age for these type of craft on the Humber.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 11:47:55 AM
 So to my build, while taking measurements from the plan in the book,  I broadly followed builds of any similar boat for ideas and ways to crack problems that arise. So for the problems kicked up by the hull I am indebted to the late Greg Bulmer (Greggy1964) for solving most of them for me! His build of the Lowestoft variant can be found here--http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19422.0.html (http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19422.0.html)
The keel (p1) is 8mm oak scaled up this is a shade under 12Ē for the real keel, the hull planking will eventually be of oak also. Bulkheads/ribs are in 6mm ply (p2) and are there not for scale but to hold the planking(obviously!) and radio gear.  I have many ideas in my head for the deck, masts and other items, but its problem solving on the fly. You cannot complete part A because part C has to be given consideration for fitment beforehand etc  etc!  My first problem came at the stern, while Greg built at 1/20th mine is 1/44th( a cock up with upscaling on the photocopier!) physically a lot smaller.  He decided on rudder control  using a worm and pinion gear below deck. On mine the clearance between inner hull and deck head in that area was akin to 10mm, not enough room to put the same into place. I thought of using a standard tiller/rod connection through to a servo, but again the problem would be the swing needed for the tiller linkage, using it would mean that not enough timber would be left to support either the deck or the hull planking.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 11:49:37 AM
 After rather too much time sitting and staring at the area concerned I decided on the idea detailed in p3. I installed two short pieces of 5mm copper tube (car brake tubing available in lengths from ebay or a local motor factors) one port, one starboard (p3). I will feed  a line through these and up to the real tiller bar above deck, the other ends will be terminated at  adjustable turnbuckles at a servo. The outward appearance will show the tiller arm is lashed down as though for rough weather or because the helmsman  ( J Edgar March in his book Sailing Trawlers, mentions that the cook was also a boy apprentice and  helmsman when necessary) is helping out on deck with the gear or gutting fish. It was common for the 5 man crews to carry out any and all work as needed. There was however a pecking order, from apprentice up to captain, boys as young as 11 serving as apprentice could be captaining a boat by the age of nineteen!
The third copper tube in the centre of p3 is fed to the stern rail, through this will be  the sheet for the mizzen boom, down below operated by a sail servo. Once the deck is in place these tubes will be trimmed off flush with the deck and disguised by cleats port and starboard. The sheet will run up beside one of the horn timbers to the taffrail and be fed through a block up to the boom.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 11:52:01 AM
 In (p4) you can see my  solution to the rudder problem.  I have epoxied a 5mm brass tube which will act as a bearing for a 4mm rod that the rudder assembly will be built on. Again the scale rudder will be much too small to give any noticeable control. After some experimentation with solutions I decided on the rudder being a hollow pocket, into which a perspex extension can be fitted for sailing and stowed inside when the boat is on its display stand. The rudder two parts are shown in p5 and p6, the perspex addition roughly cut to size for the moment, I will trim it smaller and smaller once I can see how much I can get away with in sailing conditions.
There are several  ways of keeping this type of craft well balanced for sailing. The most popular seems to be to increase the actual depth of the hull, ie add in several more lines of planking. I wasnít happy to do this as when the model is on its display stand it will look out of proportion (to my eyes) so I plan on having a detachable keel and maybe a bulb weight, more of this later.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Circlip on February 08, 2014, 11:57:32 AM
Hope some are watching the bent tube solution Brian as this is all that's required for turning the "cable" in closed loop steering systems (Oh no, not again). As you've already done, the only thing to watch is that the ends of the tube bores have been deburred.   :-))
 
  Regards   Ian.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 12:01:13 PM
Thanks Ian. I had already deburred them but I am also going to line them with plastic tubing. It just so happens that biro pen refills are just the correct size-once I get the ink out of them!

More to follow this evening when I return home.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: John W E on February 08, 2014, 12:36:52 PM
hi ya Brian56
 
I am very interested in your build, and I myself often fancy making a model similar to this - so I will be watching every step of the way.
 
As a side note, I used to know a guy from Saltwell Park Model Boat club who built similar models and he used to obtain a lot of his information through various museums but not from the Plans Dept but the Picture Galleries Dept - as they aide him with his drawings/plans
 
aye
 
Keep up the good work.
 
John
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:19:36 PM
Thanks John.

Hull has an extensive seafaring museum, but as far as this type of craft goes they have nothing. square rigged whalers yep. steamers yep, trawlers yep. every concievable type of craft except for fishing smacks, as mentioned they appeared for a very short time only 30 years in the river's history. Hull grew into a massive fishing port, but this was and still is dwarfed by the more normal import export type of commerce.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:23:07 PM
 Again problems seeking answers.  It came to me that now I have the first two hull planks in place I could actually vision the finished smack. During this moment of lucidity I saw the deck and all the clutter on it, then I thought how in heck am I going to locate the masts through the deck at the correct angle? They lean forward at a 4į angle. So I cut the keel steps for them,  then made the sub-deck out of 1mm ply. Placing this onto the upturned keel and bulkheads I used a protractor to mark out the angle on the underside of the sub-deck (p7). While I was at it I also marked onto the sub-deck where the frame timbers will protrude through to hold the bulwarks  in place much later on, these can just be seen in the photo.
 
The other problem I can now consider is the actual access to below decks once all the decking is in place. The real boat only had two smallish hatch covers forward and a small companionway aft for the crew to shelter in foul weather and during trawl runs. Referring back to Edgar J Marchís book,  much of which is anecdotal quotes from crewmen in the latter days of their lives, it seems that in foul weather the crews would set a Ďstorm sailí lash the tiller and then all of them shelter below decks, hoping to see the following day. This is going to make for an interesting solution as the deck could  quite often be awash in heavy weather and I am sure will be no different with the model unless sailing on a millpond. The sealing of the access hatch is going to take some doing.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:27:18 PM
 Now I have to contemplate the planking of the hull. Iíve put it off and put it off, but itís not going to do itself, so I have begun to line off the bulkheads ready to make a start.

 Iím not going to go over old ground by outlining the hull planking, for a refresher take a look at the in-depth article  outlined by greggy1964. Iíll just add a couple of pics and a note or two, p8,p9 and p10 show the hull now planked up to deck level. Below the waterline I used pine because oak is so expensive, above the waterline I used oak principally because I did not want to paint above the waterline but leave it natural. Several things here, first it may have been false economy because the pine kept tearing when an initial sanding was done, so the application of some filler was needed in places (the brown stuff) Then the  major problem of bending the oak planks, I bought this in 2mm sheets and ripped it to size on my bandsaw.  I knocked up a steamer using some 50mm waste pipe and an old wall paper steam stripper, this did the job wonderfully. However you have to be quick because the timber cools fast and then becomes difficult to bend. Even so some of the planking was a nightmare to do, the ones under the transom stern and on to the sides have a longways twist, a curl like a banana from end to end and curve to follow the hull. So need to be manipulated in 3 directions at the same time.
Having said all of that it has taught me how much goes not only into building a model but the real craft, these boatbuilders of a bygone age really were artisans of their trades.

 

 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:30:25 PM
 Then to the finished inner hull, what I have done is to coat the insides  with polyester resin and then lay up a single layer of well wetted grp tissue  p12.  rather than chopped strand mat.  This reinforces the timberwork in the hull adding strength p13 , secondly it also bonds to the hull adding a waterproof layer against any slight gaps in the planks. And of course this being my first build of plank on bulkhead rather than a full grp hull, there were gaps! Albeit only 3 very tiny ones, but enough for resin to seep out (and seal) so water would definitely have got in had I not grpíd the insides.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:32:05 PM
  In p12 you may just be able to see through the resin along the keelson some lead shot (the artificial type) I had from many years ago.  I ran it down both sides and resiníed it in place under the tissue. Iím not certain of how much ballast itís going to take to float it to the waterline,  but Iíve just had it on the wifeís kitchen scales ( donít worry sheís in the UK and Iím in Spain so she wonít know!) and at the moment it comes in at 1.86 kiloís. While Iím admitting to doing stuff when sheís away, I also grp in my outside workshop but then carried it inside to the lounge and left it on newspaper on the floor. Just because itís Spain doesnít mean itís hot all the time, the weather at the moment is akin to the good old UK,  too cold for grp toíset upí so into the warmth. Fortunately she isnít due back for another couple of days and the smell has almost gone now!

You will also notice in p12 the rather nasty way in which the frame timbers do not run the full depth and up the other side of the hull. The ply bulkheads  support the hull planking, the frame timbers are basically there to hold the bulwarks above deck and have no structural work to do apart from  look the part in the finished model,  the deck supports are similarly nasty looking. Not in place yet are crossbeams on 2 or 3 of the ply bulkheads also to support the deck, the deck will be well and truly epoxied down eventually. P13 shows the stern horn timbers, quite proud of these the way they went together,  a first for me to do something correct the first time. They may look odd and appear to be different sizes but this is because of the camera angle, they are all the same,  these will show above decks once it is eventually in place. The rather curious piece of ply in centre well is to locate the foot of the mizzen mast, the tiny hole is for the copper tubing that will carry the mizzen shroud from the sail servo.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:34:56 PM
   Hellooo Costa Coffee-although any coffee house would do. If you felt inclined you could even buy them in bulk from places such as Makro. What am I talking about? Deck planking otherwise known as coffee stirrers!  I was fortunate that the width of these were just about spot on for the width of deck planking they just need cutting to the correct length, I laid them out in a Ď5 plankí recurring pattern this was readily calculated for me by a neat little Excel sheet that I downloaded from another forum. I decided to go against the grain of some builders here and glue them to the ply sub-deck without any form of caulking showing p14. You will see the pattern of planks still waiting to be completed at the bow p15. Also an oversize hatch that I have cut from the centre p16, hopefully once the decking is stained and some of the deck fittings installed this wonít be noticeable to much. Iím now at the tedious part of adding all the bracing and water ingress sealing of the under-deck
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 05:40:31 PM
 Shipbuilding comes to a halt! Going back to that statement of having to consider  part C before attaching part B to part A problem. I now have to look at the lanyards that are going to act as my rudder control, trial fitting the deck now that it has a waterproof rim added to the access hatch I realise I will not be able to thread these through the copper pipes, likewise the mizzen sheet. So these are going to need adding now and have a generous length coiled up inside for later trimming. I have about 7 or 8 rolls of various thicknesses of rigging cord bought in the UK, while it may be ok for static models in no way could it be classed as authentic looking. So I am in the process of making a ropewalk! In for a penny in for a pound huh, who said modelling was easy.
 
 So this brings me up to date with the model so far, this is a culmination of the last 5 months work albeit 7 weeks of that were spent in the UK so no work at all was done on it. So back to realtime and updates will be posted as and when I get stuff done, keep tuned everyone.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Netleyned on February 08, 2014, 05:58:03 PM
Looking good Brian,
At least you are seeing the problems and overcoming them
before glueing summat that you need to get around.
Did anyone get to do anything with Greggy's hull?
His death was a bolt out of the blue.
He really enjoyed finding a way round the build problems.
The kitchen was his workshop.

Ned
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: rmaddock on February 08, 2014, 06:14:52 PM
Brian,
You must be mad setting out to build a scale sailing trawler!  I mean, who in their right mind would want to do that?  :embarrassed:

I'm looking forward to following this build.  I too am a big fan of the brake pipe solution  O0

Robert.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 08, 2014, 06:45:46 PM
Ned I don't think anyone from the forum picked it up to carry on with. I do recall seeing somewhere that it had been taken up by a member of the Scarborugh model boats club but don't know what became of it, it would have been a cracking model had he been able to finish it.

Robert madness runs in my family at least thats what the voice in my head tells me %% But no madder than your prawner subject :} We  must be cut from the same stock :-)
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Chris G on February 12, 2014, 02:37:27 PM
Hello Brian
Super build and look forward to seeing it all develop. I still manage to glue some bits before they are meant to be fixed making the next process difficult or in some cases impossible.
Lot to be said for having two on the go at the same time gives you time to think things out.
Your model will look great with the hull planking on display instead of painted. Keep up the good work.

Regards Chris G 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on February 12, 2014, 04:25:19 PM
Chris. Very imprest with your planking. I have a trawler @ 33:1 a little bigger than yours. Faced the same problems as you are now.  Came to the same solution almost. Rudder in pocket mine is operated by a servo. I use plastic fuel pipe (model engine) carry it up to the servo so cord can be renewed if necessary. Although I have a drop down centre plate it is not required as she sails well with internal ballast only.   I shall all be watching.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Chris G on February 12, 2014, 04:40:22 PM
Hello Hammer
Slight confusion methinks, the builder of the boat featured is Brian56 I simply admired it, similarly I admire yours which also looks a treat, lovely modelling by you both, congrats.
Regards Chris G
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on February 13, 2014, 05:42:22 PM
I am sorry Brian56 .but I will be watching.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dlancast on February 13, 2014, 06:30:30 PM
Keeping sailing history alive.... love it!  Very nice work gents.  I'll be following along.
Regards,
Dennis
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 18, 2014, 07:37:25 PM
And so to the next instalment.......

 Before I discuss the ropewalk Iíll finish off the rudder, p17 shows the beginningís of the pintle and gudgeon parts of the hinge mechanism. I simply cut a length of 5mm wide brass strip from a 0.25mm thick sheet I have, then using fine needle nose pliers and my small vice bent them to shape. Having done the initial bending I attached them to the hull and rudder using epoxy and then drilled them to add the bolt heads. The boltheads were simply dressmakerís pins with the head snipped off leaving about 2mm of pin to epoxy into the holes p18 and p19. A timely warning on cleanliness and safety here, p20 shows vinyl gloves, when using any of the items shown, epoxy glues, grp resins, cyano glues etc, its worth using a pair of disposable gloves. They are cheap to buy, this box of Spanish ones cost me 2Ä for 30 pairs and more importantly they keep the stuff of your fingers. Some people may be allergic to the various glues and resins, others like me just might spend the next few hours peeling the stuff off of fingers!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 18, 2014, 07:44:32 PM
 Okay down to the ropewalk, I had researched this in a couple of publications and the best internet tool there is (besides Mayhem of course) Youtube! I collected the bits together they really are a simple machine. P21 shows the assembled parts, on the left is the mechanism that does the winding, I have used 4 hooks in case I want to try winding shroud laid rope, but for most ropes 3 hooks are sufficient. Also there are four cogs that wind the hooks synchronous to each other. The hardest part was actually drilling the holes through the plywood perfectly parallel without a pillar drill. We all make mistakes, mine was the cogs, Iíd bought these last time we were in the UK, slotting them onto the hooks I realised that there was no way to secure them to the hook shaft, if you build one make sure yours have grub screws! I spent some time cross drilling the cogs and the hook shafts so they could be pinned together and then assembled  onto the plywood 120 degrees apart (think equilateral  triangle) The winder mechanism will in time be a 540 or similar motor, but for now I am using a battery drill attached to the centre shaft. On the right is the other end, a simple pulley that will carry a rope with a weight to add tension and a ring and swivel assembly that the three strands will be attached to p22.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 18, 2014, 07:47:23 PM
 The basics of operation are thus- three strands of line are attached to the three outer hooks at the winding end and all three terminate at the ring and pulley at the other. The length between the winding end and the pulley end can be as long as you like, for my experiment that was the dining table (again) But I do have an extendable square tube that I aim to attach everything to so that it is permanent.
 So the clever part of all this is the bobbin. This is shown in the centre of p23, it hold the 3 strands apart at the pulley end from premature twisting, you apply the winding torque to the cogs via the drill. Because this twists the strands on themselves you will see the weighted rope begin to lift up off the floor as the strands shorten. The bobbin should move forward under its own momentum as the line begins to form a rope behind it
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 18, 2014, 07:51:49 PM
  P24 shows the three strands attached to the winding end, p25 shows the pulley arrangement at the other end of the table. The bobbin in motion is in p26, to the right are the unformed strands and to the left is the formed rope. P27 shows the completed cable laid rope in its formed condition before cutting away from the hooks. I tied a loop around both ends and knotted it before cutting loose, just in case it decided to Ďunravelí itself.
 
The last pic for this post is p28 showing the before and after versions, the two at far left are before and after Egyptian cotton 0.10mm formed into cable. The centre two are before and after 0.5mm rigging cord (maybe Billings not sure) formed into cable. The two on the far right are before and after 0.25mm Egyptian cotton formed into cable.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 18, 2014, 07:53:03 PM
  I need rope to a thickness of .75mm and 1.2mm to be in scale with my smack so it has been successful and I will make more in the future, for other models. To my eyes I can tell the difference between ordinary string sold for rigging models and a traditional cable laid rope as you can see in p28, the formed cable has more texture and definition, a four string rope is referred to as shroud-laid. Larger (thicker) rope is made by taking your plaited cable and repeating the process until the desired diameter is reached. Iím sure there are more knowledgeable people than me who will pick up any mistakes in this description, after all I did use Wikipedia as a reference!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dlancast on February 18, 2014, 08:28:16 PM
Brian,


Very nice work sir.  The deck detail shot on Albatross does not get any better than that!  Fine job on the rope walk.  Over 20 yrs ago, i I drew up plans for a rope walk and had an engineer friend build me one.  I can turn up to five lines.  It uses a sewing machine motor with foot control.  I mounted it up in the rafters of my garage and could rope that was 15ft turned.  Admit that I have gotten lazy in my old age and no longer use it.  Found a great source of turned rigging line here in the U.S. from linen/cotton blend.  Not near as fun as making your own though.  Good job on ya.  Enjoying following along on this build.
Regards,
Dennis
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 19, 2014, 07:48:03 AM
Brian,


Very nice work sir.  The deck detail shot on Albatross does not get any better than that!  Fine job on the rope walk.  Over 20 yrs ago, i I drew up plans for a rope walk and had an engineer friend build me one.  I can turn up to five lines.  It uses a sewing machine motor with foot control.  I mounted it up in the rafters of my garage and could rope that was 15ft turned.  Admit that I have gotten lazy in my old age and no longer use it.  Found a great source of turned rigging line here in the U.S. from linen/cotton blend.  Not near as fun as making your own though.  Good job on ya.  Enjoying following along on this build.
Regards,
Dennis

I have to agree, the detail that Hammer has managed on Albatross is quite amazing. And like you my ropewalk may have to be longer. On the table I can manage 3 to 4 feet when it is wound, so you lose about a 1/3rd of the starting length. In some case this isn't going to be long enough, I hope my telescoping square tubes will be long enough at 9 feet will be a long enough base for future use.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Chris G on February 28, 2014, 12:52:32 PM
Hello Brian
So we are alright for supplies of rope now, will put my order in soon. {-)
Visited a model boat exhibition in Peel I.O.M last year where there was a chap making rope in a similar way to you and very authentic it did look. The model boat exhibition was first class btw some real enthusiasts on the I.O.M.
Your build seems to be progressing well keep the pictures coming please.
Best regards Chris G   
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on February 28, 2014, 04:22:53 PM
Thank you all for your kind remarks Hammer.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dlancast on February 28, 2014, 06:45:52 PM
It has been my experience that rigging will make or break a good model.  Nothing can compare to hand laid up rope done in the proper fashion.  You will be very happy with the extra effort in making your own line.  A question I have is the fact that the model is a working RC model, does that effect what type of rigging line is used?


Dennis
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on February 28, 2014, 07:32:07 PM
It has been my experience that rigging will make or break a good model.  Nothing can compare to hand laid up rope done in the proper fashion.  You will be very happy with the extra effort in making your own line.  A question I have is the fact that the model is a working RC model, does that effect what type of rigging line is used?


Dennis

Not too sure on this Dennis, no doubt I will find out once its finished! I think Hammer has ideas on what to use, I did have a pm chat with him months ago on what he used on the Albatross. My thoughts are that if I have wound 3 cords of .25mm into one cord, that finished cord will be 3 times as strong as a single cord of .75mm diameter.

Updates coming shortly, I've done a little work this week but been very busy so its taken a back burner over the last week or two.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on February 28, 2014, 08:26:54 PM
Brian knows I know nothing  :o about rope, string yes.  What I do know it all depends on the material the rope is made of. As for sailing model the standing rigging is not load bearing, as long as it doesn't stretch its fine. The control lines will need to be soft or flexible though.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 01, 2014, 08:44:30 PM
...As for sailing model the standing rigging is not load bearing....

I think you will find the standing rigging on a working model IS actually load bearing otherwise the mast would fall over.

From my experience the standing rigging is under most stress while the boat is being handled, particularly outdoors in gusty conditions
 :-))
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 01, 2014, 10:32:42 PM
The masts on my models are all freestanding without support from the rigging. This is possible due to scale effect, simple. It is true handling the model in and out of the car, the rigging won't help when tangling with door, roof, seat etcetera.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: derekwarner on March 01, 2014, 10:47:09 PM
Morning hammer  ok2

I suspect your masts are stepped down through the deck & into the keel plate? ....so 150 to 180 mm of actual tiled support?

1. this would provide a tremendous amount of rigidity for the mast itself  %)
2. long straight grained timber selection for the mast would also help  :-))

Derek
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 02, 2014, 09:55:23 AM
Morning hammer  ok2

I suspect your masts are stepped down through the deck & into the keel plate? ....so 150 to 180 mm of actual tiled support?

1. this would provide a tremendous amount of rigidity for the mast itself  %)
2. long straight grained timber selection for the mast would also help  :-))

Derek

My masts will be similarly stepped through to the keel (think I demonstrated this in the pics) however I am using 4 pieces of quadrant section ramin that will be epoxied together. The reasoning here was that the centre would actually contain  a 2mm diamter piano wire for stiffness and also act as the antenna for the 28mhz set I had. Since I decided on this option my good lady bought me a 2.4ghz set so the antenna is not needed but I am still going with the mast set up.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: derekwarner on March 02, 2014, 10:31:16 AM
Fully understood BrianB6.........that your masts would also be stepped down to the keel from your previous image  :-))

I have read of the ancient method of fabricating the mast construction as you note.....

Piano wire has excellent tensile strength and resistance to shear  O0.....however really is a cousin of spring steel & as such will offer little if any stiffness as a mast reinforcement centre core.......Derek
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 02, 2014, 12:15:17 PM
Quote :I think you will find the standing rigging on a working model IS actually load bearing otherwise the mast would fall over. Mr Penguin are you referring to racing yachts with masts stepped on deck? not a scale work boat. I use elastic through the dead eyes to keep the stays taught so no support at all.  I did tell a lie the mast on my two paddle steamers do need the support of the rigging. Where I use turn buckles, home made with 10BA left thread one end & right the other.  HI DEREK, when are we going to see that wonderful steam plant in a boat?
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 02, 2014, 10:22:54 PM
Quote :I think you will find the standing rigging on a working model IS actually load bearing otherwise the mast would fall over.
Mr Penguin are you referring to racing yachts with masts stepped on deck? not a scale work boat....

Aha, we may be at cross purposes here...
While the shrouds on many race boats are load bearing, I was actually thinking more of a square rigger and its many shrouds....

Regarding a scale work - all new territory to me... watching with interest....
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: tigertiger on March 03, 2014, 02:00:07 AM
My masts will be similarly stepped through to the keel (think I demonstrated this in the pics) however I am using 4 pieces of quadrant section ramin that will be epoxied together.


If you do this and turn alternative quadrants in the opposite direction (reversing the grain direction), this should help prevent bowing and twisting of the mast.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 03, 2014, 09:58:39 PM
Is the mast hexagonal where it passes through the deck, then round tapering slightly & then square at the hounds???  Mine did so I started with Half the wife's old, wooden broom stick (sorry brush handle ) These have straight grain. Other wise she would have snapped it.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:38:48 PM
 Well itís been a couple of weeks since my last update, here goes- Iíve been doing a lot of that sitting and pondering as to what should be done next without actually doing anything, its called procrastination! Anyway the reality was I had hit an impasse, I got over it by doing parts that should be done later in the build. I began with the fairleading post shown in p29-p31, a simple little part consisting of a post and a sheave. As you can see it did have the small problem of cutting the angled slot in the post for the sheave to sit in, but in the end was simply accomplished by pencilling the slot on the piece and then chain drilling with a .5mm drill bit. Once done some fine wet and dry opened the slot to the correct size, the sheave is a commercially available item that I bought plenty of to complete the finished boat. This post is situated to the port side and slightly abaft of the main mast, the cleat on the post takes the topsail sheet around it before belaying to a cleat on the aft side of the mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:42:18 PM
 The post took me about 30 minutes to complete and compared to the next part, the windlass, was a walk around the dock so to speak. The windlass has taken about 30 hours to get to the stage in the photoís, my wife said she always thought I was mad but after seeing me build this she knows for sure!
 
 P32 shows the beginnings of the build, the drawing underneath was downsized in scale from the one shown in Edgar J Marchís book done using photoshopís scaling feature. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:44:14 PM
P33 and p34 show the first parts coming together, Iíve not seen a windlass like this in the various photoís I have collected from the internet, but it is clearly laid out in his book so as all measurements were there I went with it. The first part of the windlass consists of the bowsprit bitts, the right leg has a sheave on top of the post and a sheave along its leg. The opposite leg has a hole in it, through this will be passed the knotted end of the heel rope for the bowsprit (eventually) the free end comes out the other side, wraps across the end of the bowsprit and passes around the side roller in the other leg.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:45:34 PM
The next pic p35 shows the warping roller in place along with its outer support and p36 shows the knees added to the fore parts of the windlass, along with some fine brass strip to replicate the iron banding
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:51:12 PM
 In p37 and p38 you can just make out some more detailing, the wooden pawl in the centre and its engagement cog and the whelps on the warping drum. This is where the madness comes in, apart from cutting all the small parts! I didn't have any 11mm dowelling to make the outer drums with- solution? I had some 30 mm dowel, so I marked off the 11mm on its end then roughly cut it to size on the bandsaw, before attaching to a drill (think lathe :} ) and rotary sanding down to size!  It also has a first coat of base paint. I like to put this on as it shows up defects and where it needs more sanding before a final coat of paint. I will say at this point I am using lime wood for these small parts, itís light and relatively fine grain, but I have still have to do some filling as you can see in the painted pics to hide what grain there is. The whelps on the drum I used some strip mahogany because I had it to hand, but also because the edges of it are brown,  in real life any painted surface here would has soon been worn down to natural timber leaving just the paint in between the whelps with some staining.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:53:52 PM
...
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 12:59:06 PM
Apologies for the last pic out of sequence, it would not let me paste the text! So here it is... I have done some work on the hull as well, doing the small parts gets the mojo back and you want to get on with the big parts! In fact Itís quite a lot of work I have done really. In p39 you can see I have installed the batteries and servoís along with the halyards that will operate the tiller arm. The drum servo for the sails is proving my sticking point at the moment, the drum is not sufficiently large enough in diameter to take the actual thickness of sheet that is required for scale appearance. So I am open to suggestions here. I was looking at direct connection to the drum, but to do this will mean using my scale sheet above decks and a certain length below deck, then it would have to be downsized by tying a thinner cord to it so that it passes around the drum.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 01:01:16 PM
 Looking at p40 I have thrown in the almost finished deck as well, that has the two fore hatches in place along with the horse, this is an iron band transverse across the foredeck to take the sheet of the jib sail, no control being necessary, it was allowed to move along the horse as the wind blew it, only lengthening or shortening the sheet as required. Poking out from under the deck and also in plain view in the previous pic are the final oak planks for the bulwarks waiting to be glued into place.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 01:03:29 PM
 Then on to p41 and p42, shock horror! The hull is painted, not as I wanted but it is painted.  I was looking at the pale green colour for the anti fouling, however I wanted to be faithful to the book and in it he mentions that anti fouling in the 1800ís for these boats was actually tar! Now that is simply depicted using matt black paint, my problem is the nearest hobby shop to me in Spain is 60 kilometres away, I canít justify a 120 kilometre round trip for a 2Ä pot of paint. I did source some gloss black house paint closer to us,  a 250ml tin for 8Ä. But after applying it to some scrap wood and leaving it for a day to thoroughly dry I sanded the surface to remove the shine, it was horrible! So I went with the old faithful red oxide primer that I brought over from the UK last September along with other modelling stuff (yes its available here again 60 kilometres away, we are remote!) So I used the green above the water line and up to deck level, I am unsure as to whether to paint the bulwarks this colour or leave natural oak as I was planning, March says both options were used depending on the vagaries of the owners. You will also notice that the strapping for the deadeyes is in place, I wanted to get these properly fastened inside of the hull before the deck is glued into place and space is limited for adding epoxy over the ends of the pins. Dressmakers pins make great bolt heads at this scale as long as you cut to length so that the pointy bit is removed!
Finally you may also have noticed on the wall a couple of sheets of plans for the Brixham trawler ĎValerianí I am using these for the general arrangement of rigging etc. Any reference source that is available can be adapted as these boats, irrespective of port or builder were all based on the original Brixham boats, if it works why change it- then as now is always a good philosophy. These plans are available from Brown, Son & Ferguson, their website is www.skipper.co.uk.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 06, 2014, 03:22:11 PM
Brian coming along fine. The paint on mine is the result of an accident. I painted in the colours you see now, but decided to change to black all over. Unfortunately or fortunately the grey paint reacted, and the black stated to bubble so in desperation I removed it. Well all I could but I liked it so it stayed.
I have included pictures of the rudder, out of water retracted & extended in the when water.
I also utilised the Valerian plan used the hull lines, & master hand for the rigging. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 07:48:32 PM
Your model is the conundrum I now face Hammer. I have new and pristine paint on mine, but to me nothing looks so false as unblemished paint. In the real world it would be peeling and blistered like yours due to weather and seas. So I would like to weather mine when done, it's just bringing myself to actually carry it out on the finished boat. Maybe I'll take photo's of ot first and then rough it up so it looks like a real smack.

Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 06, 2014, 08:10:44 PM
Good idea Brian. As I said it was an accident. I have posted photos of the Pilgrim being rebuilt at Dartmouth. Now completed. Note the yard just a large band saw in the shed that's all.
I am glad to see you can see some of your planks, as it should be.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 06, 2014, 09:09:19 PM
@Hammer. Yes I have one or two planks showing {-) I can never understand why build a sailing ship and then sand smooth the timber, they were never like that in real life. Yes if you are depicting a 'modern' hull in steel but your material is wood. I don't have a problem sanding and filling and even coating the outside in resin. You are afterall showing a smooth steel hull, but a wooden sailing ship should be wood!

I like your reference pics Hammer. As it happens the two books I have that refer to these boats March's Sailing Trawlers and Watts'  Holmes of the Humber (life story of George Holmes 1861-1940) The first printed in 1950 the second in 2009 both mention the total non existence of the Humber variety of smack, this is not so! One did survive and was sold I think originally to Iceland. From there it made its way to various countries and owners until finally it has ended up back in Lowestoft! It is now owned by the Excelsior trust and is in storage until funds can be found to restore it.

Old ships may be gone but are not forgotten and sometimes just sometimes turn up again.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: derekwarner on March 06, 2014, 10:31:32 PM
Brian56 & hammer.......I agree there is nothing more satisfying that to see a wooden hull being built in traditional ways....[we have a member BB in Queensland of OZ building a model in a similar manner in another thread]

An interesting aspect of this thread is the securing of the planks to the frames traditionally with treenails [& hex head bolts].......... :-))...but it also suggests that modern technology is helping

Is the glue being used for the treenails a modern polyurethane?.........possibly the most advanced gluing material for wet environments & actually cures best with moistened timber

...& even better waterproofing qualities that that old ground up horse hoof granules we used to melt down in a boiling water bath...... O0......Derek
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Mad Scientist on March 07, 2014, 02:33:47 AM
...Brown, Son & Ferguson, their website is www.skipper.co.uk (http://www.skipper.co.uk).

Well, this was a pleasant surprise! I'd had no idea that this firm was still in business.
Thanks!
 
Tom
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 07, 2014, 04:16:35 AM

Well, this was a pleasant surprise! I'd had no idea that this firm was still in business.
Thanks!
 
Tom

Online catalogue is a bit tedious, plans listed by ship name no images so you have no idea of what you are looking at unless you are after a specifice named vessel.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 07, 2014, 04:21:50 AM
Brian56 & hammer.......I agree there is nothing more satisfying that to see a wooden hull being built in traditional ways....[we have a member BB in Queensland of OZ building a model in a similar manner in another thread]

An interesting aspect of this thread is the securing of the planks to the frames traditionally with treenails [& hex head bolts].......... :-)) ...but it also suggests that modern technology is helping

Is the glue being used for the treenails a modern polyurethane?.........possibly the most advanced gluing material for wet environments & actually cures best with moistened timber

...& even better waterproofing qualities that that old ground up horse hoof granules we used to melt down in a boiling water bath...... O0 ......Derek

From my reading reference material Humber variants were with few exceptions bolted and then plugged as per the photo of Hammer's. As to the glue shown in that refurbishment pic of Hammers it would have to be a guess,  but looking at the drips it doesn't have the yellow tinge of traditional hoof glue.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 07, 2014, 04:57:31 AM
....The drum servo for the sails is proving my sticking point at the moment, the drum is not sufficiently large enough in diameter to take the actual thickness of sheet that is required for scale appearance. So I am open to suggestions here. I was looking at direct connection to the drum, but to do this will mean using my scale sheet above decks and a certain length below deck, then it would have to be downsized by tying a thinner cord to it so that it passes around the drum.

This could cause you endless grief if not sorted properly.
The scale sheets must be very big in diameter as those winch drums will hold a fair bit.

Are you relying on the sail to pull the sheet off the winch drum and up through the fairlead?
Do you have some idea how much the sheet will need to travel from close haul to sheeted out?
There is the potential for tangles within the winch drum and also between the winch and the fairlead below decks..
You may be better off with the winch running an endless loop and attaching your sheets to the running loop.... I am not quite sure how things are supposed to go together with the layout of the boat or how many sails you are controlling so I may be way off track.... apologies if so...

By the way, those winches are currently available in 1.5, 2, 4 and 6 turn variants... I think it is the HobbyKing ones you are using?
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__285__254__Boats_Parts-Sail_Boats.html
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 07, 2014, 12:26:43 PM
2 1/2 turns mr penguin, sourced via a shop in the UK called Howes. But you have seen my dilemma, the sheets are 1.2mm diameter at scale size. I am looking closely at a closed loop system in a book I have to see if I should go that route rather than direct connection.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 07, 2014, 04:34:14 PM
Trawler PILGRIM, yes I believe the glue is a polyurethane type. Also using mastic instead of pitch in the joints. 
Brian. I have found the closed loop system is much more reliable than direct drive. In the photo below is my method. The whole thing in an elongated box with the servo mounted on the side in the middle, with a pulley at each end one spring loaded. The box is removable as a unit.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 07, 2014, 09:32:33 PM
@Brian56:

have a look at this video of a loop winch setup with winch below deck and loop on top, it might provide you with some inspiration perhaps....

This is on a cheap Chinese boat of mine, it works great.... far better than the original setup that relied on the sails pulling the sheets up through the fairleads. The boat is a Surmount, 800mm long.... I know it is a long way from what you are doing but the winching setup may be relevant to adapt for your boat

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=JWhI3F_MY74
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 08, 2014, 07:30:04 PM
That would be all right on a scale.Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter where the lines come back to the cockpit. But not on a reasonable representation of a Sailing Trawler.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 08, 2014, 09:09:51 PM
That would be all right on a scale.Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter where the lines come back to the cockpit. But not on a reasonable representation of a Sailing Trawler.

@Hammer:
No worries.... I shared the video as I was thinking that some of the mechanical principles may be of value for what Brian56 is considering.

I did find this thread where you posted similar information that may be of use to Brian56:
http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,46145.msg467531.html#msg467531
Includes a really good diagram of the loop winch....

I am not familiar with how a sailing trawler would be sheeted, nor even the sail plan of Brian's as they seem to have a few variations. I have had a look at the photos you posted relating to your trawler but I guess I am just missing the basics of what sheets go where if you know what I mean. I will watch with interest to see how Brian56 solves this...

Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on March 08, 2014, 09:16:53 PM
Mr Penguin Don't get me wrong for a pilot cutter it would be good.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on March 08, 2014, 10:12:05 PM
Mr Penguin Don't get me wrong for a pilot cutter it would be good.

@hammer:
No offence taken, just interested in how the sheeting might work on a boat like this... obviously the boat is laid out differently to a Bermuda rig and the sheeting requirements wold be much different. From your other post, I gather the mizzen only needs half the travel of the mainsail, thinking this may apply to Brian56 as well?
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 09, 2014, 03:11:19 PM
OK guys, with the limited space I have inside the hull, today I tried various combinations of servo position etc. Nothing was going to be easy, most locations just would not work because of the physical size of the sail servo. In the end I have gone with the included drawing. Two pulleys at opposing ends firmly anchored into the bulheads. The servo remained in its original position and I added a jockey wheel retained by a spring to act as a shock absorber to the main line. the sheets for the main and mizzen booms will come off the longest  side of the servo line. This gives me about 100mm movement along the hull forward and aft.

Just have to hope this is going to be enough above decks now %%


Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 15, 2014, 02:11:49 PM
 Well again itís been a week or so since an update. I had to re-evaluate how I was going to control the sails. I have gone for a loop system as per the drawing in post reply number 68.  I did intend a direct to servo system and in all honesty I wish I had stuck with it! The amount of change within the hull r/c control systems has been a royal pain in the butt. However I digress, this week I have managed to get the deck into place, p43 and p44. It looked good with no more complications, so out with the clamps and try to figure out how to clamp it into place while the glue dried p45. There has to be an easier way to do it, elastic bands were not strong enough to pull the deck into place along the sheer. If I had to do it again I think I would upturn the hull and place it on blocks of wood and then add some heavy weights along the length of the hull.
So it was left overnight for the glue to set yep itís on the dining table again, fortunately for me my wife was back in the UK for a few days again, so she will never know! Then back to my workbench to begin on the next stage- the deck level rubbing strake, the bulwarks and capping rail. Itís at this point I realised that several ringbolts p46, that should have been fastened with nuts through the deck are still in my parts box. Fortunately as they wonít be taking any strain Iíll have to settle with putting them in place with epoxy.
 
you may also notice on the portside a missing frame rail. At this section they are closer together to allow a removeable secion of bulwark that reveals a roller to allow the inhaul of the trawl net. So I have cut it off and will have to re-align it, a bit of dextrous cutting of spare coffee stirrer and I should be able to plug the hole in the deck.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 15, 2014, 02:24:12 PM
Well its saturday afternoon so its off down the local cafe bar to meet the other expats who live in the village. Its going to be midweek before any more updates, hopefully I'll get the pictures up and also maybe have the windlass completed.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 29, 2014, 06:40:08 PM
 So Iíve been a busy little bee, p47 is a shot along the length of the hull. Now in place are the bulwarks up to capping rail level. The tiller arm is in place as well, better shown in p50, you can see how this is controlled with the two lanyards entering the deck at each side. Fortunately my transmitter has a reversing function so that unlike the real boats pushing left would make the boat turn right, pushing the stick left will mean the model turns left.
In p48 can be seen the bulwarks and previously I had mentioned leaving them natural, however viewing it on the table from a distance it just doesnít look right against the green hull, so they are going to be green as well, inner bulwarks are going to be a buff colour. Also seen in place p48/p49 is the winch. I canít make up my mind about this, it looks too big for the space it occupies. However double-checking measurements it is the correct size, corroborated by the fact the jib does just fit in the bitts. If the winch was oversize the jib would obviously be too small a diameter to fit.
Also to be seen in these photoís are the fore hatch to what is referred to as the dill room and the main hatch where nets, trawl gear, cables etc were stored. Also the small diameter brass ring (yet to be painted) for the anchor chain to pass through.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 29, 2014, 06:44:34 PM
 You may notice that I donít have a particular order in which I complete jobs. To some this may be an unorganised way of working but it does work for me, if I get bored with one thing I move on to another for a while.
To this end p51 and p52 show the beginnings of the main mast. I have as I mentioned earlier in the topic gone for quarter round pine (not ramin) p53 is two of the quarters already glued together with aliphatic resin. These were held tightly by clamping them to the bench top and up against a straight edge shown in p54 and p55. In p53 you may have noticed the piece of piano wire in the centre. This is shown better in p56. Iím sure Iím not going to have strength problems with this mast, it has quite a large diameter for its short height. But from the beginning I had intended for there to be a piano wire rod up the centre to act as an antenna for the old 27mhz set I had. This is now out the window replaced with a 40ghz set but I have stayed with the wire up the centre, so p56 shows the wire epoxied into place in one half of the mast. The other half will have a fine coat of epoxy laid in the centre and then aliphatic resin on the timber before being clamped to the first half. The epoxy in the centre is to bind the wire to the wood and fill any voids, the aliphatic resin bonding the wood together. Essentially I will have a timber mast with a wire and epoxy core, if it wants to flex so be it, but it will be strong!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on March 29, 2014, 06:48:39 PM
 Finally in p57 a taster of what is to come soon. Double and single blocks and the deadeyes. The blocks are wood with working brass shieveís and as you can see they are small, a shame but only doubles and singles are available, I'm going to have to attempt to modify the doubles to make a couple of triples for my needs. They are not cheap at £0.60p each but the quality is second to none, available fromÖ..
 http://www.modellingtimbers.co.uk/1.html (http://www.modellingtimbers.co.uk/1.html)
They are priced on the website but the owner prefers an email with your requirements. He then sends you a return email with any up to date prices, send the cash by paypal and your order can be with you in two days!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 09:57:52 AM
 Today marks the seventh month of this build and by far the longest Iíve spent on any model Iíve built in my lifetime,  the hull is almost complete and the time is fast approaching for all the rigging to be started.
 This week Iíve completed the capping/hand rails shown pinned into place in p58 and p59. There has to be an easier way to do this than I came up with, Iíll outline my method: First of all I turned the hull upside down onto a length of paper, for my purposes this was 3 sheets of A4 taped together. I then traced a line around the hull leaving me with the bulwark top transferred to the paper then I places some greaseproof paper over that and pencilled the line on to the greaseproof, so far so good I taped the two together along the top edge so that the greaseproof could be lifted up. Then I cut lengths of mahogany strip wood that I had saved for just such a job. Laying them along the drawn line on the A4 paper I dropped the greaseproof over the top so that I could see the pieces through it. I chamfered the butt ends to get the correct fairing to follow the lines on the greaseproof.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 09:59:41 AM



Once I was happy with the cuts I glued each piece direct to the A4 making sure to slightly straddle the line. With both port and starboard done and glued to the A4 I  repeated the process, so that in effect I had two courses of mahogany stripwood sandwiched together which gave extra strength. I left it overnight to set up and cut the strips free still attached to their paper backing. Turning them over the paper gave me an outer cutting line to follow on the bandsaw. Offering them up to the hull I was reasonably happy with the way they fitted on the outer edges, so some sanding and they were deemed fit for purpose, shown in p58.
I then took a pair of compasses and set the gap to 7mm then using the pointer along the outer edge I transferred this to the unfinished inner edge. This was then sanded down to the line and after many checks against the frame timbers and bulwarks I was happy with the outcome. The paper was sanded off the underside and each rail was then glued and pinned to the hull in p58/p59. The stern taff rail was completed slightly differently, as it was small I cut two pieces of the stripwood and glued them together at a shallow V angle  to take into account the curve of the rail. In this case they overlapped one over the other at the centre, once dry enough to handle I cut two more pieces and butt jointed them on opposite sides of the first two. This gave me a continuous double strength piece, once fully set they were offered up and the outer edge of the stern  was pencilled on to them. Once more cut on the bandsaw and sanded to final shape the compasses gave me the inner edge line.
As I said there must be an easier way but as this is the first sailing model I have made Iím happy with it.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 10:05:22 AM
 I also completed the forward windlass that I started previously. Again I used the tried and tested method cutting the pieces from timber and gluing them together, the two bitts and knees shown in p63. This however through a spanner in the works. It required two small sprockets for the pawls to fall into and also two larger ones that actually form the winding mechanism. Nowhere could I find on the internet anything suitable.
However while browsing around the local Merca China (this place is a goldmine of stuff if you have the time to spend) I came across a shelf of those kiddies toy cars, the ones you pull back and release and they trundle across the floor. I bought a couple for the grand sum of 4Ä got home and under the gaze of my wife disassembled them, the  body parts went in the bin, she walked off shaking her head, but I had 7 or 8 usable sprockets!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 10:07:06 AM
 Then the problem raised its ugly head, I had completed the octagonal winding drum, I think I prefer the olde worlde eight quartered as a description! Building up the quarters around a piece of dowel. I attached the sprockets at each end ready to attach to the two bitts, the drum is shown in p61 and p62. The problem was the smaller sprocket on the winding shaft that engages the larger of the sprockets on the drum has gone missing. I couldnít find it anywhere, none of the other left overs were small enough so that meant another trip to the local town to buy another toy.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 10:09:26 AM
 P64 shows the winding drum attached to the bitts and p65 shoes the two brass bearing mounts for the drum shaft, these were simply made with some brass shim and forming with round nose pliers. Then we move on to p66, this is the winding shaft, complete with new small sprocket, notice the blood on the cutting mat? I was using a small diameter drill bit in an archimedes drill, looked up out of the window to see who was coming down the drive. The drill bit chose this moment to break through the other side and bury itself into my finger.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 10:10:37 AM
 This shows the steel shaft complete with its timber bearing mounts ready to attach to the bitts. Then finally for this piece we have p67 and p68, two views of the finished item, showing the bolt heads and the two shackles on each bit for the detachable winding handles. Also to be seen are two plastic cleats, the diagram in Marchís book shows just the one on the inner face of the cleat, but since I have plenty I stuck one on the rear face of the starboard cleat as well. So apart from some final tidying up with wet and dry this is ready for paint and mounting.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 10:14:06 AM
 Lastly for this update we have p69, this is showing the partly completed mast blank in place on the hull for a test fitting, if you recall this was begun back in topic reply number 72. This is indeed made up from the 4 quarters of pine. I also formed at its base an octagonal section simply made by having drilled a 12mm hole through the centre of a 14mm square piece of pine. The blank was then glued through the hole, once the glue had dried the octagonal faces were scribed onto the blank and then sanded back and a slight taper from 12mm to 10mm sanded along the length of the mast. Done by turning it in a power drill while holding sandpaper around the shaft.
The build now goes into a hiatus for a month. We are returning to the UK and my MG which has been in the garage all winter now needs mot and tax and maybe even a trip back to Spain with us? However SWMBO insists I have to sell it, wonder who will win that exchange of opinions? So expect a new update around mid May.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 09, 2014, 11:17:53 AM
Oh nearly forgot!

here is a photocopy taken from Edgar March's book, perhaps someone more knowledgeable than me can answer a couple of questions.

In the upper diagram can be seen arrowed (2 small arrows) a cavil rail, also lined in the lower diagram. This appears to span the gap between the port bitt and the bow post. Would this be correct? I've not seen such a set up on any of the black and white photo's I have, but they are not very clear.

Also in the top diagram is the forestay arrangement. It is anchored through the knee of the bitt with what appear to be lashings through a bullseye, how could this be tensioned should it be necessary? Then you have the way it passes through the bow post, I don't have a problem with the lower part as it has a nice curve to it, but the upper part shows the stay exiting the post at an acute angle, a point of extreme tension and liable to fray! In the lower diagram there is something marked 'score' on the bow post, could this in fact be a roller of some type for the stay to pass over?

Over to you gentlemen....
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on April 09, 2014, 04:03:03 PM
Brian. This is my interpretation.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on April 10, 2014, 10:12:18 AM
Brian the fore stay could be tensioned using the winch & a traveller, before fixing with the lanyard. Mine is a mess I am afraid, it is hat elastic so the stay remains taught.  I have no idea what the score is all about sorry. Hammer
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 10, 2014, 06:15:44 PM
Thanks for the replies Hammer. You are a mine of useful information each time a prolem arises. On the plane in the morning so any forum bashing by me for a week or two will have to be done on my tablet, I'm more at home with a laptop!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on April 11, 2014, 05:11:27 PM
Before someone picks me up. A small rope used to pull a lager one is not a traveller but a messenger. It made me look in my library so checked on score, only thing I found was. The grove in the outside of a block where the holding rope rests. So must just be the exit hole in the stem.
Bring some sun with you. Hammer. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Netleyned on April 11, 2014, 05:20:04 PM
Score.   Grove.    Groove

Seems to follow.

A lot of old shipwrights terms seem to change spelling slightly
as they were modernised.

Ned
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dlancast on April 14, 2014, 02:24:32 AM
Awesome work Brian..... as real as it gets.  Really enjoying this build.
Fairwinds,
Dennis
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on April 17, 2014, 07:57:00 PM
Awesome work Brian..... as real as it gets.  Really enjoying this build.
Fairwinds,
Dennis


Sorry Dennis but mine is simple and nowhere near the quality of work you have produced in your build. That square rigger is something to behold!


I've managed to borrow my sons laptop so back to posting! can't wait to return to Spain though, roll on the 7th May. On the bright side its meant I have now re-supplied all those little bits that you always seem to be missing when you need them!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Duncan on April 30, 2014, 07:43:30 PM
Hi Brian

I just saw this youtube video of the Brixham trawler Leader and thought it may be of help to you as it shows her in detail. Link is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIKcKi_De4k (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIKcKi_De4k)

Enjoying the great progress you are making, Duncan
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 01, 2014, 05:15:16 PM
Thanks Duncan, I thought I had all the videos available on youtube! This one showsa wealth of detail.
We are booked on next wednesdays ferry back to Spain,  so new updates should follow quickly after that. I must say I have missed the building these last couple of weeks.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on May 01, 2014, 07:41:52 PM
Unfortunately Leader's deck layout has been altered considerably, including a wheel instead of the original tiller. A great gang who maintain her, in the winter they meet on board every Tuesday. I was lucky enough to have a tour last year, a day before she broke the topmast in a gale. I was out in a replica Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter at the same time.  I will admit I was a little sick, 16 hours Brixham to Southampton not bad for a gaffer.   
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:26:37 PM
 Iím back with an update, but first a photo, p70. This is how I hate to work! God knows how I managed to get in such a mess and this was how I left it before the UK trip. I am such a stickler for neatness whilst working bordering on the obsessive/compulsive! Iím at a loss to explain how I got in such a state, never again!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:28:19 PM
 So I am back and working out of sequence once more. I have made up the deadeyes p71 is self-explanatory really. I took some copper wire, in this case is was the earth (ground for the American readers) from some 1mm twin and earth cable. For a reason I donít know, the earth  is always slightly less diameter in these applications, but just the right diameter for me. As you can see I wrapped it around the deadeyes then trimmed to length. Once done each was soft soldered to the chainplates already installed on the hull. I chose to soft solder because these are not going to take any great strain in my usage, it will sail occasionally but for the most part sit on a shelf in the lounge. Also installed are the forward cavil rails just needing the addition of belaying pins. Nothing to these except lengths of oak shaped so they were correct. These are in photoís p72 and p72a, you can also see the deadeyes and the windlass and winch.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:31:02 PM
 P73 is the blank for the bowsprit, one end of a length of 10mm dowel trimmed down to 8mm and then four pieces of pine glued to them to form a square end to the round dowel. This was then mounted in the trusty hand lathe (electric drill) and sanded down to final size of 8mm tapering to 7mm. Why the glued on pine when the final size would be 8mm? Well if you were to square off a piece of 8mm round, your finished squared part would be closer to 6mm, in other words your square section would be smaller than the round section, My way give you a little extra stock to work with, this can be seen in  p74 as the two differing grain patterns show easily.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:33:52 PM
 Every boat needs a crew and these smacks were known as five man boats along the Humber (not sure of other areas) technically this was four men and a boy, sometimes the son of the captain, more often than not a lad from a local workhouse as young as eleven! Anyway without resorting to O gauge railway figures which are extortionately expensive, while in the UK and in a model shop they did some cheap figures (1/48th) However all that came close were these in p75, a box of Africa Korp germans.
 Ridiculous you may say, but p76 shows one before and after figure I have started work on. Gone is the weaponry, off with an arm to reposition it, shave the head down to eventually form a souíwester. He is well on the way to becoming the tillerman
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:35:58 PM
 Back to the ship- p77 are the forward roller fairleads. The timberwork is simple to construct, I donít think they need further explanation except to say that the brass rollers were commercial items purchased from Modelling Timbers along with brass belaying pins. P78 is in their finished state of black paint.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:38:06 PM
  Hereís a failure! P79 are some nice fine wood shavings from my plane. I had read of a way to form mast hoops, take the shaving and form them around the correct diameter rod, in my case I found it easier to soak them in water first. Smear them with glue and wrap them around the rod then put aside to dry. Twenty four hours later some nicely formed laminated wooden tubes! However on cutting to the correct thickness on the bandsaw, the resulting hoops p80 and p81 were obviously too week to take any strain that may be passed through them on sailing. They were strong but deformed easily, so back to the drawing board for the mast hoops.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 12:39:28 PM
 Lastly hereís another problem, p82 shows my access hatch, it has failed to follow the contour of the deck and stands slightly proud and so not even remotely waterproof! In the next instalment I hope to show my solution- if it works.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dlancast on May 16, 2014, 05:18:41 PM
Nice work Brian. I love your approach to this project and the realizm you are bringing into it.  Great fun and looking forward to the finals and sailing.  Wish I could buy your MG, but them days are gone... used to own a 69 MGB/GT right out of military service.... great fun.


Take care,


Dennis
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 16, 2014, 05:30:50 PM
Thanks for the compliments Dennis, I too had a B GT many years ago. Sadly an operation back in 2010 meant I had to give up riding motorcycles so reverted to type and bought an MG TF! Happily it did pass its annual test of roadworthiness and has transported us back to Spain with no trouble at all, wife wasn't impressed that I didn't sell it though :-) I'm sure she had eyes on spending the cash from the sale!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on May 16, 2014, 08:14:37 PM
Brian, With your ingenuity I am sure you will over come the deck problem.  My solution the rubber used to draft proof windows. Basically a tube with a tongue which pushes into a grove. ( see earlier in thread ) I have 2 screws inside the fish hatch & 2 more in the companionway. On the Pilot Cutter 4  countersunk screws strategically placed under planks which are a press fit between the fixed planks. In the photos the screw holes can be seen. Also the cutter picture the space for the missing plank is just visible,  ( pages 1 & 3)   Geoff
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 17, 2014, 08:03:39 AM
Ridiculous you may say, but p76 shows one before and after figure I have started work on. Gone is the weaponry, off with an arm to reposition it, shave the head down to eventually form a souíwester. He is well on the way to becoming the tillerman.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 17, 2014, 08:06:06 AM
In the last post you can see a problem that occurs from time to time. Text that is pasted is reproduced so small it looks like a solid line!   This is a paragraph that was missing from post 95, or should I say it is there but it is like the above post.  Lets see if I can get the missing paragraph here..
Ridiculous you may say, but p76 shows one before and after figure I have started work on. Gone is the weaponry, off with an arm to reposition it, shave the head down to eventually form a souíwester. He is well on the way to becoming the tillerman
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 03:45:31 PM
 As I left off my last update here is my answer to the lifting access hatch in the deck. These ships had a trawl towing post most commonly called a Dummy in these craft, I utilised its build to help tie down the hatch. P83 and p84 shows the beginnings of a square tube I formed from pine.


 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 03:46:50 PM
 If we move on to p85, the square box I am forming has bulges on the four sides to form a kind of fixed vertical capstan. I made these utilising the trusty hand lathe ( power drill ) mounting a length of dowel in the chuck p85, I worked it with sandpaper until I had two Ďbellyísí in the dowel.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 03:48:08 PM
Then cutting down the centreline to form two halves and then again across the dowel to form four quarters p86. This gave me the bulges to glue to the sides of my square tube, also in p86 you should be able to see from the line plan what I am trying to achieve, I think this makes it clearer.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 03:55:19 PM
So we move on to p87 and p88, we now have the square tube waiting for the addition of the four pieces of dowel and also an m5 set screw- no prize but who knows the difference between a set screw and a bolt? If no-one answers I’ll post it next time, I’ll come back to the set screw shortly.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 03:58:11 PM
 The Dummy also formed the fulcrum for the arm or pump brake of the bilge pump, this can be seen roughed out in p89. Now does anyone see in p90 and p91 a mistake! The square tube finishes at the same height as the quarter bellyís that are now in place on the tube. As is the way of things I only noticed that I had failed to trim to size after I had glued the pivot into place. Over to the bandsaw and cut to size then carefully trim away the excess from the pivot before re-gluing.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:00:48 PM
On to p92 (and p93/p94) and a trial fit on the access hatch so far so good.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:02:39 PM
 If we go back a couple of pics to the set screw. I epoxied this inside of the square tube so that it protruded by 35mm. This goes through the deck and into a swivel lock underneath the access hatch p95 in the open and p96 the closed positions. All I need do now is put the hatch into place turn the towpost a couple of turns and it tightens the hatch down as the catch engages against the opening edge. Once down enough the handle of the pump locates in the bilge water syphon. The groove is  waterproofed with the addition of some silicone tape.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:06:19 PM
 I am making many fiddly little parts here and regret the fact I no longer have a unimat lathe. This was stolen quite a few years ago when my workshop was burgled and at the time I saw no reason to replace it, now I wish I had!
So next up was the steam capstan. Back in the late 1800’s this innovative piece of equipment brought massive improvements to the fishing industry, Invented by Elliott and Garood it was to be seen on almost every fishing smack around the coasts of the UK. The five man crew of a fishing smack could spend 6 hours or more hauling a trawl by hand if it was deep and full, the steam capstan meant it could be done in less than 30 minutes and the nets reset.
 In p97 shows the beginnings of the capstan, the two lower discs are in place on the shaft, this shaft has no function here except to mount the capstan flukes to, these are roughed out and also shown. P98 has the first four flukes in place and p99 all eight of them now glued to the shaft.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:08:01 PM
 Then the top two discs are slid down the shaft and are glued to the flukes p100, this now gives us the almost complete capstan in the rough and still needing so fine sanding. The very top disc is a cheat, in the real capstan this is a crown wheel which does the turning of the capstan, the steam for the mechanism passes up a pipe in the centre of the capstan and activates two pinion wheels. As I didnít have a crown wheel of any size in my parts box I have had to cheat and make do.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:09:41 PM
Almost finished now, p101 and p102 are two side views of the capstan showing the top. Fortunately for me the actual drive mechanism’s were always covered with a tinplate cover, so all I have had to do is simulate this.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:11:22 PM
As you can see, two pieces of ply cut to size and suitably rounded on the edges do this function. There was always a small warping drum mounted to the top drive as well. Finally to finish it completely I thinned down some varnish to water consistency and using a piece of toilet tissue p103 and p104.  I covered the piece of square ply in two layers, leaving the bottom edge slightly oversize to give the impression of a ‘tin’ cover.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:12:27 PM
 Now hereís the odd bit, when it was completed it looked way oversize to the resin figures I have- coming to chest height on them. As I was working from a drawing that had measurements on it, I disappeared into my toolstore and took out a tape measure, the drawing said 42 inches top to bottom, holding the tape against me sure enough almost 42 inches to my chest height, so the capstan looks big but is correct!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:14:59 PM
After the capstan I moved on to the main sheet chock. I’ll post a couple of pictures but it really is a simple piece.  P105/106/107 show the almost completed fitting. I simply cut a piece of oak to the correct size, hollowed out the middle and then added on the two upper clamps that hold the spindle for the double block in the centre. I took one of the double blocks I had purchased from Modelling Timbers and drove out the pin securing the shieves. Then substituted my own the width of the chock and capturing the double block in the centre.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on May 23, 2014, 04:17:18 PM
 The hardest part of this fitting was the bullseye to the front of the chock seen in p106, I formed some brass wire around a bullseye that I had p108, and then with some panel pins doubled the wire back on itself to form a loop, really fiddly to do at this scale! Finally on the rear side of the chock is a cleat, again I have some plastic ones that are spot on for the scale so that was fastened into place with epoxy.
 Iím rapidly reaching the end of the deck fittings, all that I have left are the rear cavil rails and deadeyes, the dandy score, transit rail, skylight, companionway and a few cleats. Then it will be time to mount the masts. But before this I will need to turn the it back over and give the hull its final coats of paint. Having said that Iím not sure what the next instalment will have, bye for now.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on May 23, 2014, 07:05:33 PM
A set screw is threaded for its whole length, a bolt is not. Hammer
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:01:08 PM
 Before I begin this next instalment of the build Iíd like to introduce you to my latest precision piece of equipment, or in my wifeís words Ďa new toyí p109 and p110. It was my birthday at the beginning of the month but this is the first time weíve been Ďshoppingí anywhere near a suitable place for her to buy me something. I wanted a Proxxon disc sander but at 208Ä the colour drained from her face, I had to make do with the Dremel drill press at 46Ä.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:03:16 PM
 So first on the workbench was the companionway, not a lot to describe really, build a box add the corner details and the sliding top job done! P111/112 show it finished and with a coat of stain but before any sort of weathering to it. Now some of you may have noticed the poor finish on the paint on previous deck fittings, this is deliberate, I want a worn and weathered look to the end model to reflect that it was a hard used working vessel. The deck fittings so far have been stained in a basecoat of oak and then drybrushed (technical term for dipping the brush into paint and then wiping it all off before application) with green, black, ochre and white. Then an all over wash (another technical term!) of dirt brown, this gives the timber pieces a worn and distressed look.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:04:48 PM
 At some point in a model build I think most of us must have reached a low point when you throw your arms in the air and want to give up. For me this came with the assembly of the skylight! Not a box this time but a proper framework so more fiddly to do, I had seven attempts before I managed to get parts to stay assembled! I have a new found respect for matchstick modellers gluing them end to end!  Three sides had to be built as a framework p113/p114, each of the three sides having frosted glass.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:06:54 PM
Although not shown in the open position, one third of the top opened as an air vent and of course for the skipper to shout down to the ‘lazy’ deckhands below when he was at the tiller p115!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:08:42 PM
In p116 and p117 you can see two of the failures that ended up in the bin, in both cases I had made the framework too deep, hoping to get the parts glued and then trim down to size was a failure-start over!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:10:11 PM
Finally for this stage in p118 and p119 is the finished skylight, now glazed with frosted glass and in its basecoats of paint before matt varnish goes on.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:11:45 PM
 In p120 I am showing an error in measurements that is impossible to correct. I took measurements below deck for the main sheet to enter/exit and attach to the sail servo, everything looked fine at the time and so the deck was fastened into place. Above deck the main sheet chock was glued into place and the sheet passed through it. Only when it came to placing the skylight on the deck did I realise the chock was too far to the stern by about 15mm. So the skylight is tight up to the mizzen mast without any room for adjustment due to the chock, itís just something I will have to live with, but unless anyone very knowledgeable is viewing the finished model, it wonít be noticed.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 03, 2014, 08:13:20 PM
  So the last two pics for this update are p121 a shot along the length with most of the deck fittings now in place but with the decks still waiting to be weathered and still needing the outer hull to receive its final paint before the masts go in. Then p122 a shot of my personal boating lake, I spent the last week vacuuming clean ready for the influx of family and friends who seem to think we offer free holiday accommodation in the summer months!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on June 03, 2014, 10:08:27 PM
Looking good Brian. A little information the edges of the companionway would have metal strips on the corners as protection.  As you know painted green.  You will need a bigger lake for the trawler.  {-)
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 04, 2014, 07:17:36 AM
Yes Hammer, the metal strips seem to be on anything and everything that may have a rubbing action applied by the many ropes etc. At this scale its a law of diminishing returns. For the hinges at various points I have used brass shim at 15 thousands thickness, but it looks overscale and stands too proud from the surfaces, I may add them with white glue to see how much they stand out- being able to prise them off if I'm not happy with the look.

My personal boating lake may be too full of sunburned bodies by the time its finished :} Good job I have another one a bit further away, the farms around here all have what are known as casitas/deposito's, huge concrete stores of water for the crops. My nearest farmer has one about 50 metres square that is ideal :-))
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 04, 2014, 12:23:10 PM
Because I am at final paint/finish stage for the deck and fittings I have been back to my reference books and realised how colourful some of these craft actually were!

Master Hand a Lowestoft smack and I think the boat that Hammer based his model on, had as a colour scheme the following:-

Bulwarks and sides of stanchions--Green
Rail and face of stanchions-- Mast colour*
Arch board--Blue
Stern frames--Green sides
Around helmport--Blue
Cavil rails--Mast colour*
Hatch covers--Blue
Iron work---Red
Other woodwork--Mast colour*
Windlass barrel--Blue/Woodwork-Mast colour*
Winch same as windlass
Transit rail carries name of boat in Gilt letters stamped into timber
Capstan-Green

I have starred the mast colour because nowhere in the two books I have does it actually mention what colour this was! I a assuming natural colour with some sort of oil to protect it from the elements.

So I have plenty to ponder-one thing for certain my transit rail won't have the name on it. No way am I going to even attempt lettering on something that is only 1mm in thickness!


Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 10:58:16 AM
 Picking up from where I left off weíll move on to basic painting. In p123 you can see I have now added a weathering wash to the deck. A wash is a very thin (translucent) paint layer, it would be better to call it tinted thinners really. Brush it on and let it run into the grain of the wood and all the nooks and crannies, then after it has settled for a minute or two take a brush with clean thinners on it and brush away the excess. At this point Iíll mention a little about paint because it is crucial really. Any of the processes I have used here can be done with acrylics and enamels or as I do a mixture of both, but they do need handling correctly.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 10:59:44 AM
 If using acrylics once a layer has been added its best to seal them in with a matt varnish, as with everything there are exceptions- If you want to blend in two or more  colours do it while the paints are wet or semi dry and use a wet brush, water for acrylics or thinners for enamels. Once your desired finish is achieved seal it with the varnish before moving on. In p124 you can see a shot along the deck with typical worn paint on the various pieces.
Now this is artistic license here, in other words covering another mistake! Iím not sure about other fishing communities but in Hull and around the Humber ports it was considered unlucky for fisherfolk or boats to wear or be painted green. I donít know how far this superstition goes back so Iím using that as my excuse for painting the deck fittings and inner bulwarks green.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:03:49 AM
Now on to the outer hull, p125 shows my initial paint layer, this has been sealed as already mentioned. Then a brush dipped in water was dabbed in various places and rock salt was sprinkled on, this is a process known as salt weathering in the plastic modelling world. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:08:12 AM
Moving to p126 you can see the final coat going on, it is black because Hull boats were usually finished with a layer of bitumen over what was known as red lead paint. I should say that at this point I am spraying (airbrushing) Humbrol enamel but any of the acrylics will do, I used AK acrylics and also artists supply Windsor and Newton on the boat so far.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:11:28 AM
This technique can be done with a brush but it’s awkward to keep the salt in place, you would be better off using hairspray if you wanted to brush paint. Hairspray does a similar job and dissoves with water to remove, the finish is a lot finer than salt.
 P127 shows the paint dried and p128 shows my initial removal of the salt. Give it a dry brush to remove loose particles and then a wet brush to dissolve the underlying salt
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:15:16 AM
 This gives the end result seen in p129, eventually it will look like the boat has done several fishing seasons in the harsh weather conditions offered by the North Sea. The paint worn away on the underneath from being Ďon the hardí this is a term used when a boat is beached for unloading purposes. Usually herring fishing was a catch and return when full, the boats operated independently using many hook and lines. Unlike fishing as part of a fleet, when using trawl nets the catch would be transferred to fast cutters which would deliver the catch to port allowing the smacks to continue trawling.

Smacks would run for the nearest harbour to unload, frequently along the east Yorkshire coast the harbours could be full. So the smackmen would run the boat up the beach as far as possible, as the tide receded the boat would Ďsit down and heel overí at which point horses and carts were driven out for the herring catch. The boat would refloat and set sail on the next tide.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:26:02 AM
The next photo p130 I have never come across before, it’s a masking tape with 150mm wide polythene sheet already attached, perfect for masking up over the blue pin striping tape seen in p125. The pinstriping tape available from car accesory shops is ideal for marking water lines, it is low tack made of stretchy plastic so can follow compound cures very easily. This way I can mask up to the waterline and then put the masking tape/polythene over the top.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:30:29 AM
So on to the next photo's p131 and p132, the salt has been removed from the whole hull and the next stage of weathering has begun. This can be seen as streaks from the washports and chainlinks etc. Surprise surprise, this technique is known as grime streaking. Because I have used enamels here there is no need to have a varnish layer, if you had used acrylics for the hull paint the layer should be sealed with varnish to stop the already mentioned bleeding of paint.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:36:33 AM
You take a thinned colour, I used black and mid brown. It has to be quite thin for this to look right and not like a painted line! With a fine tipped brush run fine lines downward from, as here the chainlinks and one or two of the bulwark stanchions, basically anywhere that dirty water may exit the boat p132. After letting it sit a short while, acrylics will dry faster than enamels, take wide fat brush dipped into water (acrylics) or thinners, dab it dry on a cloth or paper towel and dragging the  brush downwards lightly blend the line out until it’s barely visible.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 15, 2014, 11:40:59 AM
It will look like p133 when complete. One very heavily weathered boat hull, almost ready for use. This will be left overnight to set up, then taken out into sunlight to see how the weathering looks, too heavy and some can be removed, or left or more added. Once happy it will then be sealed in with several layers of finishing varnish and then the hull protected with felt so that the rest of the build can continue, I did notice viewing the photo's I have several small areas of paint to remove where it has crept under the masking tape in places, these will also need to be cleaned up before final varnishing.
Now painting like this may not be everyones cup of tea. However any craft at sea will not be pristine with the action of wind and salt water, so why not depict them as such?- Oh one last thing, when painting the hull I noticed that I have left off the bow trawling roller/fairlead, Iíll have to add this in the next episode also, then back to boat buliding with the addition of the masts and maybe even get around to starting the rigging?
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:33:20 AM
Back to some building then but first just a couple of photo’s of the hull at present. In p133 you see a shot of the starboard side showing the finished weathering, then on to p134 showing the port side, this is complete with its registration number. A little bit about the number, I didn’t want to use a number that had been on the register of that period because I was building a generic of my naming and not a specific vessel.
However this was harder than I first thought. Consulting the Maritime Museum in Hull (
http://www.hullcc.gov.uk/museumcollections (http://www.hullcc.gov.uk/museumcollections) ) it seems just about all records for this period were lost in the bombings of the city in WW2 so couldn’t help. I turned to another website ( http://hulltrawler.net/ (http://hulltrawler.net/) ) that has as much if not more information than the museums! Even so there is not a great deal from the turn of the century, I went through the registration list for the late 1800’s and then chose a number that was not listed. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:35:37 AM
A view along the deck is shown in p135, I have now added the bow trawl roller that I mentioned was missing in the last post. I still have a few niggly little parts to add to the deck but as they will be delicate fittings I’d rather leave them until very late in the build so they are not disturbed.  P136 just shows a shot of the portside weathering around the bow and midships depicting where the trawl line and the nets would be hauled.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:38:39 AM
Ok back to building. In p138 is my solution to the mast hoops. I searched around for something about the right diameter that I could press into use after my disaster with making them up with timber shavings. I came up with 15mm copper pipe! I cut it into 1.5mm thick slices on the bqndsaw which gave me what you see on the right of the photo. In the forceps is a thicker band that was the beginning of the gooseneck, I had to cut a slice out of it to reduce the diameter down to that of the mast, p139, so it became 12mm diameter not 15mm. I made up a second piece in brass to hold the gooseneck itself and then soldered them together across the cut in the pipe p140, it just needs some work with a file and it is ready for paint.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:40:40 AM
On to p141 and my pile of mast hoops, that should be the first 12 hoops, more are needed for the mizzen, for now I am concentrating on the main mast because I canít get on with the trestletrees and other upper paraphernalia until these are slid onto the mast.The piece of marble is just something I picked up in the garden (its full of it) flat enough to sit on the bench and act as a heat barrier while soft soldering, silver soldering I do outside.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:46:25 AM
 P142 shows the first part of, I have to get technical now, seizing (whipping) a length of halyard to the hoop. The next photo p143 shows how I formed a loop in the halyard and then seized the other side. Into the loop I placed a tiny brass eyelet, this is to attach the sail cringles to. Sails appear to have been attached to the hoops in various ways, the way I have shown here through an eye using a rope. Lashed direct to the hoop itself and with a steel shackle direct to the hoop.

 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:49:45 AM
 Photo p144 are the first 12 hoops complete and in a base coat of brown paint and p145 on the mast, again with the beginnings of the main boom, this already has the gooseneck in place but still needs work. P146 the same hoops but with a weathering coat on them, the hoops are quite labour intensive taking about 30 minutes per hoop to complete so 6-7 hours in total just on these 12.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 10:52:53 AM
  The last couple of pics are of the other end of the main boom, p 147, a top view of the 4 shieves for the reefing pendants, the shieves are 2mm and available from Modelling Timbers. The shackle for the main sheet block is in the centre, this should be held in place by two timber bands but I have used brass as it will be painted. Then at the tip in p148 is the fitting to take the clew shackle and topping lift. This still needs one or two items adding to it and a lot of careful sanding particularly around the reefing shieves, but for now it is going to one side to allow me to carry on with the top of the main mast, so hopefully that will be the next  instalment.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 11:51:50 AM
Oh one last thing before I go. Anyone spot the difference in the picture of the two x-acto blades?
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on June 23, 2014, 11:57:58 AM
Yep the bottom one has the point missing.

SAFETY ALERT!!!!!!

WHEN USING KNIVES OR SCALPELS  ALWAYS  MAKE SURE THE COVER IS BACK ON!

I had placed the knife down and it had leant against a piece of timber on the worktop, forgetting it was there some minutes later I reached over to get a clip. It embedded itself in the upper part of the base of my thumb causing quite immense pain. Pulling it out I was surprised at how little blood there was but also how I could not move my thumb properly.

A trip to the local medical centre and one expensive consultation plus xray later. I now know I have a piece of blade stuck in the bone! of my thumb with nasty nerve damage. The doc says the nerve will heal and my thumb will be back to normal after a couple of weeks. Don't worry about the blade tip it will calcify over.

So take heed, my thumb still feels funny, touching it the feeling is like it is numb sort of like your mouth is after cocaine at the dentist, but I am getting movement back.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 11:51:06 AM
 Since the last post I have been getting on with the main mast top or trestletrees/yoke. After studying the drawing in the book by Edgar March it was obvious that this consisted of several pieces that in model form could be omitted. I began with the cheeks shown already mounted on the mast in p150, simply cut from some sheet oak and shaped. The book describes the mast as transitioning from round to square at this level before returning to round, I opted to do just the two faces that the cheeks were rebated into. The cheeks themselves as can been seen sit in the mast at their bases, over the length of the cheek the thickness is tapered also.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 11:52:28 AM
  In p151 it shows how I omitted detail, the trestletree itself is made of one piece suitable morticed to go around the cheeks. In reality this sat on the top of the cheeks and then extra timber was added to the top to form the bolsters for the shroud lines. The trestletree itself was a bit of a mare to cut, 4 attempts and 3 failures when I was cutting the hole for the foot of the upper mast. The timber kept splitting along its grain, I managed eventually.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 11:55:52 AM
 On to p152. The trestletree is wrapped in a 3inch by 1/4in iron band, I cut some brass sheet to the correct dimensions and bent it to profile then as shown in p153 epoxied it to the trestletree. P154 and p155 are angles showing the top mast slotted in to check for alignment.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 11:58:01 AM
Now we get down to truly fiddly little parts, p157 are eye plates to go on either side of the cheeks, bent up from brass and drilled for fixing pins. These are in place in p158 along with the brass band on the trestletree, all now fixed with dressmakers pins, these are ideal for bolt heads at this scale.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:02:03 PM
 P159 and p160 show the eyebolts and the main halyard block crane. The crane was made up with stainless wire and silver soldered where the legs join, it was then epoxied into the mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:05:45 PM
Moving on to p161 I was looking for something to use as eyebolts with enough strength to take the forces of wind acting on them when sailing. I came up with these, looking through the many sections of our local ‘pound shop’ for inspiration I came up with fishing swivels. Cut the centre part away with sharp side cutters and it leaves the two ends. These are ready twisted and made of a strong wire, ideal, it saved having to make them using round tipped pliers and ending up with several of different size and quality. You can see a couple of them epoxied into the mast in p162.


Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:08:59 PM
 P163 and p164 show the many bolt heads, eye bolts and the crane iron now finished in a matt black, some refer to this as the crance iron but technically this only refers to the fitting at the tip of the bowsprit. At the top of the mast in p165 is a side mounted shieve, this is for the mast rope for hauling up/down the top mast for winter fishing. The rope passes through the shieve and down to a second shieve cut into the centre of the top mast, this is often referred to as a heel rope, however heel ropes are only used for the outhaul of the bowsprit. P166 is just another gratuitous shot of the mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: tigertiger on July 02, 2014, 12:11:11 PM
Hi Brian


An alternative for eye bolts that works is to use cotter pins. I have used these successfully. Drilling pilot holes through the width of the spar/mast then gluing with CA, and snipping off the exposed end on the far side.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:12:14 PM
 On to p167 and the heel of the top mast. Again this was turned to profile in my hand lathe ( power drill) from some square stock. You can see in this pic the Fid, this is the wooden dowel used to support the top mast on the trestletree. In my case I have used a length of piano wire thinking anything in wood this small was asking too much of it strengthwise for sailing. Then p168 is a side shot showing the centre mounted shieve for the mast rope, the lower part of the lowering mechanism for the top mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:15:21 PM
Hi Tiger, yes that was my first thought but living out in rural Spain I have to make do, however on our next trip to the city (60 miles away!) I am going to have a good search in the big diy outlet and get in anything like that which may be of use. Its amazing when you look at the shelves how you can envision a use for most things %%
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:17:17 PM
 Now the mast cap had to be assembled and put into place to allow further additions to the top mast, in p169 is the initial assembly. I have fashioned a band in brass and then silver soldered it to a piece of sheet brass. Then in p170 the second part of it a simple band to the diameter of the top mast done the same way. Then both of them wrapped in an outer brass band that was soft soldered in place, p171 shows the finished part in matt black paint and ready to be epoxied to the top of the main mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:19:29 PM
 On to some interesting stuff, I have had to make a start on some of the blocks as they are an integral part of the main mast. P172 I show some of the blocks I purchased from Modelling Timbers, thes are little works of art, a timber block and working brass shieve only 60 pence each. My first problem came with the main halyard block, itís a triple, the blocks are only available in single and doubles.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 02, 2014, 12:31:30 PM
 My solution is shown in p173. I cut one side from a single block, removed the pin and freed the shieve. Taking a double block I pushed free the shieve pin and then lightly sanding the cut part of the single block to size I glued it to the double, then placed all three shieves back in to the now triple block with a new pin made from brass wire. The final job was to bend the shackle and glue it into the top of the triple block once I had drilled the holes with a micro drill and pin vice, p174. The final photo p175 shows the block hanging from the crane iron.

It's been a long update this week but the next one will be shorter we have family coming out to avail themselves of my -Boating lake  sorry swimming pool.So next time it will be main boom, bowsprit and a start on the mizzen, along with a couple of photos of the build so far.

 
 


 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:09:43 PM
 I met head on a major problem of my own making and haste this week. For some time I have been looking at the boat and thinking something doesnít look right. Moving to the mizzen mast and I finally got it. I had made the mizzen the same diameter as the main mast! Iíll get to that later but check it out in p176 and p177.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:12:06 PM
 Iíll show another two of the boat so far with p178 and p179, thatís four pics and I think you can see clearly that the mizzen looks wrong, too large a diameter and it has an incline to the stern and not to the bow! These pics show better the weathering effect overall, maybe not to some tastes but as I stated previously these were heavily worked boats and to my mind its wrong to display them any other way.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:13:44 PM
 OK I finished the blocks on the trestletree and yoke from the last instalment, these consist of both rope stropped and hooked blocks in photoís p180 and p181. The crosstree is in place, this caused me a few headaches. Tapering down a piece of oak and then a piece of lime and then an offcut of plain old pine board, none of them had the strength to take the flex that may be applied by the upper mast stays. They all snapped under the slightest flex. I thought of using a piece of piano wire of the correct diameter but securing it to the trestletree would require epoxy in a place it would be seen. I found the answer in a kebab skewer from the kitchen! Correct diameter it flexes and returns, and made of bamboo so a light sand and it took the woodstain as well-result! Lastly for this you can also see the lantern shackle now added to the top cap, simply made with a 2mm shieve and some brass wire.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:15:24 PM
 Now on to finishing the main boom. Like the cheeks at the top of the main mast it carries two eyeplates at the heel end. These are in photo p182 again simply made as described in the trestletree/main mast post. In p183 you can better see their location close to the gooseneck, the upper part of the boom has a cleat, again one of my plastic ones fitted the job here.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:16:41 PM
 Then back to the other end of the boom and the shackle added for the attachment of the clew earing p184, p185. This again was formed from some stainless wire bent around round tipped pliers and squeezed to fit the two locating holes drilled in the boom. P186 are the two eyeplates now mounted port and starboard of the boom, securing in place again with dressmaking pin heads.  So apart from sanding off any excess ca and epoxy glue the boom is finished and ready for woodstain before weathering.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:18:44 PM
Next up is the bowsprit, the heel of which carries a shieve and is grooved along each side for a length of 8ft at 1 to 1 scale. I left the shieve out as I am rapidly running out of them and just have the groove to take the heel rope. The forward end is a simple affair, having a vertical groove for a shieve, this one I have added as it’s far more visible in the finished model, p187. On to the bowsprit is slotted a round traveller with a hook for the jibsail. This shown in p188, the open end of the traveller being silver soldered together and then cleaned up with a grinding stone in the dremel. Under the bowsprit is a length of thin brass strip to represent the iron rubbing strip of the real craft.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:20:04 PM
 Once running rigging is added the outhaul comes up from below through the shieve and attaches to the traveller, the inhaul along the top of the bowsprit and again attaching to the traveller. So the final part to add is shown in p189 and this time correctly referred to as the crance iron. This is the band around the end of the bowsprit to take the bullseye for the top mast stay.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:21:07 PM
 Moving on to the mizzen mast and the first pic p190, illustrated how I got the mizzen wrong. I cut out the old mizzen no easy task as I had epoxied this into place. Cleaned up the resulting mess and then made up a new mast of the right diameter. In essence I had used 10mm dowel and it should have been 8mm tapering to 6mm. So p190 is the new mast in place with the correct forward Ďleaní and does look more in proportion now.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:22:36 PM
 Now down to the mizzen mast fittings, p191 more mast hoops ten of them this time, taking into account the smaller diameter mast I have used 10mm copper pipe to make them. You will notice a different coloured thread, I have used 20 mtrs of black thread on the main mast and five here. The only thread I have left in .020 thickness was this natural so I have used that and will paint it black. Then p192 shows them slotted on to the mizzen mast and painted, you can also see the beginnings of the smacks skipper in this photo, still a work in progress thatís why heís missing limbs!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:24:07 PM
 On to the next photo p193, this is the hounds or in modern parlance the spider band. Again made with 10mm copper pipe I made up two side plates and a single tang so it had five lugs in all. This was silver soldered.  In p194 you see the next stage of the build, four rings added to four of the lugs and a double block added to the fifth. Unlike the main mast where the shrouds are conventionally looped around the mast, the mizzen shrouds are attached by shackles to these four rings, the double block is for hoisting aboard the aft end of the fish tackle.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 15, 2014, 06:26:52 PM
 P195 is the hounds in place on the mast and painted and then in p196 is the full rig of the mizzen mast, from the top down we have :-
Topsail halyard shieve
Double block for mizzen staysail halyards
 Eye (unused) for standing end of topping lift
Single block for topping lift
Two singles for peak halyards
Mizzen crane with a double block for halyards
  Hounds as already described. So thatís it for now, next up the mizzen boom and gaff and the main gaff.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:29:30 PM
Hi everyone not much to describe here, the mizzen boom has been completed and really it’s just more or less a copy of the main boom with much the same fittings p197 (the drawing underneath is not the boom!) The notable exception here are the reefing clamps shown in p198, instead of individual reefing clamps like the main boom, the mizzen has one long one on each side. Then p199 is the foot of the boom showing the cleat, gooseneck and eye plates made as already described.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:31:47 PM
 Back to the drawing in p197, this is the main gaff and p200 shows the start of the build. The photo shows the thumb cleats underneath to which the wire spans that attach the peak halyards butt against. Above those is a strengthening wooden strip known as a fish batten (no idea why itís called this) The batten is bent (another nautical term for tying/fastening) to the gaff with rope in four places. Then on to p201 this is my template to make up the gaff jaws, the jaws themselves are two pieces of 2mm pine strip glued together so I have a 4mm thickness. The template will be copied to this glued piece for cutting out.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:34:46 PM
 Next up is p202, the end of the boom with flats sanded to take the prepared jaws and p203 with them in place. Time for a fiddly bit, p 204 is the tumbler made from a 4 by 4mm piece of square stock cut to shape. The tumbler is the part that takes the force of the end of the boom against the mast.
Also p204 shows the completed jaw end. This has all the Ďliftingí eyes in place, two under, one for the throat shackle and the second for the topsail sheet. The iron tumbler shown in brass pivots in a slot in the gaff and the upper eye takes the double block for the main halyards. The bolt heads in the side are not out of alignment, the third one in is offset from the centre due to its proximity to the pivot for the iron tumbler, apparently so that any forces exerted by the tumbler are not in the same plane as the through bolt.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:36:58 PM
P206 is the fish batten now seized with rope to the peak of the gaff, I have run out of black thread so blue has to suffice, this will be stained black on completion. Then p207 and p208 is the completed end with the topsail cheek block in place with its brass shieve and the thumb cleats shown clearly.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:39:53 PM
Back to the jaw end and they are wrapped with a steel belt in two places, I tried to cut a thin enough strip of brass for this, but it was too stiff to wrap around, so I went with black card glued into place with pva, p209.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:41:20 PM
 All that was left were the wire stays for the halyards to attach to. I began with loudspeaker cable, stripping off the insulation to leave the copper strands, I pulled them into singles and then taking three of them, I twisted one end around a hook and while holding the other end I twiddled the hook around ( like a handheld ropewalk!) until the three twisted into one wire, in the haemostat in p211, perfect! I then formed loops and wrapped them with thread. But they looked clumsy and totally wrong as shown in p211.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:42:40 PM
 So I had a think and then decided on what is pictured p212. I formed the loops and then soft soldered the wires together, much more to scale than the thread and more like my big scale plan on the wall. Onto the wire strop went a brass bullseye ready to take the halyard blocks, then the whole wire was painted black. A better outcome than the thread wrapped ones.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:44:51 PM
 Next up I  had to make up the parrels. Gentlemen take yourselves down to your local Dunelm Mill or haberdashers (your wife will know if you donít) They have in boxes various sizes of balls as shown in p213, and in different colours. These particular ones are 2mm and exactly to scale, slotted on to some rigging string and then through the two horns of the gaff, p214.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:47:41 PM
 The mizzen gaff is essentially the same build as the main except for the thumb cleats the first and fourth are along the centreline of the gaff but two and three are offset to either side of it, p215 and p216. My big problem here was the dimensions of the gaff. To scale this had to be 4mm, but 4mm pine dowel was too flexible, so was 4mm ramin dowel. I made one up from some 4mm aluminium rod, but then would have all sorts of problems attaching other items to it.  I finally took a length of 6mm oak square shoved it in the hand lathe and sanded it down to 4mm round, just on the off chance- it worked! Enough stiffness I think to take the strain of light sailing, if it snaps Iíll cry and resort to making it with all its problems with the ali rod.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 02:49:28 PM
Now a quick attention to detail, the various halyard blocks on the main and mizzen are shown as having hooks, on closer inspection of the drawings in my book(magnifying glass) the hook is wrapped with what appears to be wire. On reading the text of the book it seems that the halyard blocks were both shackled and hooked, the hooks being ‘moused’ (wired closed) so that they do not become ‘unhooked’ so I have been around the open hooks and put two turns of copper wire across the mouth of the hooks. That's all for now, next up finish of some of the deck detail and begin the standing rigging.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: dreadnought72 on July 22, 2014, 05:23:18 PM
I am loving all of this. Very good indeed!  :-))

Andy
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 22, 2014, 07:48:19 PM
Thanks for the vote of confidence Andy. This model so far has taken the longest of any I have ever built in my life! But it has been rewarding, working out how to make things look to scale while still being strong enough to take strain being the main one.

I was going to rebuild my offshore support vessel after this, but I think I have gotten the bug for all things fore and aft rigged O0
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: pugwash on July 23, 2014, 12:32:44 AM
Brian a smashing build.  Just one comment that may be of use to you, as well as modelmaking
I also do some fly-tying and some of the beads and bits and fine threads that fly-tyers use can be
very handy in modelmaking
Geoff
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on July 23, 2014, 05:17:59 PM
Thanks for the tip Geoff. Being in Spain the only fishing stuff to be found is for sea fishing! I'll try ebay and have it delivered to my son and he can post it out- post in rural spain if the address is not exactly correct seems to 'go missing'. In other words the postie can't be bothered to find the address so it gets lost at the back of the office!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:40:38 PM
 It is my sad duty to inform every one of the demise of the skipper who appeared in photo p192. He expired from a blow to the head caused by a wildly swinging mizzen boom- more thinking is going to be needed here. As mentioned earlier I wanted to attach him permanently to the tiller, because of the boom this is not going to be possible, a static figure canít duck out of the way!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:41:49 PM
 OK light heartedness over with and on to finish the deck fittingís that I previously mentioned. Letís start on the port side aft, in p219 is the Dandy Score, that is, a roller and shieved fairlead to haul in the aft end of the trawl beam. This was essentially achieved much the same as the forward rollers. A bottom plate, a sculpted top plate with the notch cut out for the shieve. The only difference here was I extended the foot plate as can be seen, cut a slot in it and inserted a length of brass wire, the end was capped off with a small piece of brass sheet. The part is shown unpainted and not fastened down in the photo. When finished it needs moving forward about 20mm so that the roller is above the dirt stains on the hull side.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:42:51 PM
 On to p220 and p221, this is the aft winch to aid hauling in the aft end of the trawl beam and net, this winch is better known as the Dandy Wink. It was easily assembled, making up a small box/plate to fit under the cap rail, the roller made with a dowel on to which my last remaining gear wheel was epoxied, on to that went the support post. Then the whole unit was glued under the cap rail and to the deck. All that is required now is to make up the handle and attach that under the cap rail where it was kept, never left on the Wink!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:44:29 PM
Next up the starboard side, across the capping and taff rail a large fairlead for mooring purposes, p222, again cut from an offcut, this took three attempts before I managed to make one without snapping off the horns. Trial and error settled on drilling out the centre portion, shaping the outsides and only then cutting the gap into the centre between the horns. Last up is p223 forward this time to the main mast, just a simple guide roller for the bowsprit when it is inboard, the bowsprit slides under the forward winch and stores on this roller. For some reason this photo makes the whole thing look out of alignment, but the winch and this small roller are in line.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:45:58 PM
 That is as far as I know the deck fittings finished with, although Iím sure when I go back and re read the texts and look at the diagrams I will have left something off. There is of course the ships boat, Iím leaving that until last. Also some fish boxes to make up and other detritus to add, but that is definitely for the end of the build.
A little more about these craft:--
 Fishing being carried out almost year round meant various methods of fishing were done. At times they used long-lines and hooks for herring when they fished alone. Other times they fished as part of a fleet for demersal fish (bottom dwelling) these fleets were known as Boxer fleets. The fish being packed into boxes and then transferred either to a smack heading back to port or later on, to cutters to get the fish back to the markets quickly. The catch was transferred between smacks and cutters by the ships boat in boxes, hence Boxer fleet. This was done in all weathers and seas and saw many first and second hands lose their lives.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:47:04 PM
 Rigging! I have been looking forward to this with both eagerness and trepidation. I have never rigged a ship before so if I achieve anything but have done it wrongly, tough, if it looks ok itís staying!  I began with the standing rigging and the six main mast shrouds, laying them out I attached the deadeyes to the lower end and seized them into place shown in p224. Once I had the six done I trimmed all the untidy ends off as per p225, look neat donít they!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:48:22 PM
 Moving on to p226 I made up a spacer using two thumb tacks and a length of coffee stirrer. As can be seen in the photo I used this to space all the deadeyes the same. I started on the port side, located the spacer and then wrapped the other end of the shroud around the hounds as in p227, it was then seized into place just like the deadeyes. When this first one was completed, the spacer was moved around to the starboard side and the opposite one was done. So you alternate port to starboard, fore to aft with the shrouds until all were completed.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:49:17 PM
 Now this is where I became inspired (probably done by hundreds before me!) The lacing of the lanyards through the deadeyes began again on the portside p228, yes this is wrong, I took the photo before I realised! It should begin in the top deadeye and run to the bottom one. Carrying on I realised that if I began tightening the lanyards as I progressed I may pull the mast out of alignment. So while lacing this deadeye, I put the spacer into the opposite shroud on the starboard side allowing me to tighten the lanyard. Once the first was completed, I removed the spacer and laced the starboard one, repeating this process until all were complete.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:50:32 PM
  In p229 you can see them all done and p230 is a close up showing how the end of the lanyard was finished off, according to the book, Sailing Trawlers mentioned previously, they took two half hitches around the shroud but didnít describe how the hanging end of the lanyard was Ďtidiedí away. So I have a left a couple of inches on each one until I get the magnifying glass out and study the black and white photoís in the book.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:51:46 PM
 Up the main mast we go for the next photo, p231. This shows the shrouds and how they are laid one over the other around the mast, I have made an error here in that the seizing on the shrouds does not extend far enough down the shroud lines. As it wouldnít be noticeable to any but the most avid aficionado I am leaving them be, but may, just may add extra windings before the craft is finished!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:54:03 PM
 On to the aft shroud lines next, these differ from the forward lines in that they do not wrap the mast but are attached by Ďpearí shackles, my first problem, make the shackles. I took a length of 4mm brass tube and cut it down the centre p232, then filed it down so that it reduced even further. Turning the end around a pair of needle nose pliers I ended up with p233, I then cut this off, in p234 and p235.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:55:02 PM
Nipping the ends together I had a shackle with a slight groove to take the upper end of the shroud as can be seen in p236- this is one shroud complete and the shackle through the ring bolt of the second one. The lower ends of the shrouds and deadeyes were completed just like the forward ones. The aft shrouds are stand alone, only the forward shrouds have ratlines which I shall complete later. I would rather have the space to attach running rigging first.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:56:59 PM
 Now for the wire main mast stay. I took a length of loudspeaker wire, stripped away the plastic covering to expose the strands and then separated them all. Laying them out in threeís p237, I took the first three and twisted one end around a nail the other end went into my battery powered drill chuck. Using the power of the drill as a Ďropewalkí I twisted the three together into one wire, p238. So far so good, I now had to repeat this twice more so that I had three wires each made of three strands. Then finally these three were again twisted into one wire p239 to give me the correct overall thickness.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 05:59:33 PM
 Thinking about it afterwards I am sure that just twisting all the wires together in the drill would have achieved much the same finish as I ended with! So p240 is the wire with rope seizing extending along 7inches (model inches not full scale)of its length. This loops around the upper part of the main mast, the seizing is to protect any running rigging that may rub against the wire stay. It was at the point of attaching this to the mast that I noticed a mistake that I canít correct without a lot of trouble.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 06:01:21 PM
 The six main shrouds should also have this rope protection not only along their length, but also around the loops themselves, as mentioned I can extend the rope downwards but no way can I do the loops. If I take them off they will not go back on, essentially they will end up short because of the added circumference at the top. In other words all six would need to be re-made, I’m not going to do that.
So p241 and p242 is the wire stay seized around the peak of the main mast and p243 shows the lower end where it enters the stem post and around the shieve that is set into it. Then p244 is the reverse angle. You can see the stay entering the stem and coming through the rear face of it to another pear shackle under the central cavil rail, this is made up as previously described. The shackle is warped to the brace of the port bitt, I left the warp rope its white colour here so it showed better in the photo. I have yet to tie off the loose end and stain it.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 01, 2014, 06:05:44 PM
  Last up for this week the rope staining technique. I use various strengths of tea in screw top jars, you donít need much, I have made two jars, with about 30mm of boiling water. The first had two teabags added, the second had four. Left for 24 hours the teabags were disposed of, leaving two varying colours of dye! Add your ropes to each of them and leave until desired colour is achieved then remove and dry. Empty the jars and rinse out after use or you will find a nice culture of green stuff begins to grow which is not pleasant. Finally in p245 you can just about see all 10 shroud lines and the wire stay, now that the bowsprit and the mizzen boom are in place it is rather too big for the workbench and my turntable to swivel without doing damage. I am negotiations with swimbo to use her art table for a short while- if no further updates appear I may be laying dead with a palette knife stuck in my back!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Netleyned on August 01, 2014, 06:27:28 PM
Sailed Vigilance at Brixham in June but no photos of rigging.
Going again in Sept and will try to overload with photos of lashings etc

Ned
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on August 01, 2014, 09:32:50 PM
Brian I think you will find the end of the lanyard are seized to the stay. Above the seizing of the stay.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: derekwarner on August 01, 2014, 11:16:07 PM
So much progress in 7 months Brian..... :-))...so many different metal fittings cut, bent, twisted. soldered & installed ..... amazing :o

One simple question......... {:-{

In the model, are the octagonal masts stepped down into the keel plate and glued?.......or are they secured by alignment & supported on some sort of tapered arrangement or fox wedges?

PS....nice to "see" your voice here hammer.... O0 ..... Derek
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 02, 2014, 08:51:19 AM
Sailed Vigilance at Brixham in June but no photos of rigging.
Going again in Sept and will try to overload with photos of lashings etc

Ned

That would be good Ned, there are sadly very few clear photo's available- however modified over time since the original builds!

Brian I think you will find the end of the lanyard are seized to the stay. Above the seizing of the stay.

That is the route I went with Hammer, it just seemed two half hitches around the seizing on the shrouds didn't look correct.

So much progress in 7 months Brian..... :-)) ...so many different metal fittings cut, bent, twisted. soldered & installed ..... amazing :o

One simple question......... {:-{

In the model, are the octagonal masts stepped down into the keel plate and glued?.......or are they secured by alignment & supported on some sort of tapered arrangement or fox wedges?

PS....nice to "see" your voice here hammer.... O0 ..... Derek

They are stepped and glued into the keel Derek. I will get on to mast flex in the next post, this has caused me some consternation which I will explain then.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 05:47:48 PM
 Just a short update this time, we had a friend appear out of the blue which curtailed modelling.
 So I moved on from last time and completed the topmast stays shown in p246, again made with twisted copper wire and the loop soldered and then seized. The other end was finished with a single block in p247. This block is attached to a second block in what I believe is referred to as a gun tackle rig (please correct me if Iím wrong) the second block hooks to eyes let in to chocks on the capping rails, the chocks were to stop trawl ropes fouling up against the forward shrouds, these are shown in p248 just above the ĎHí on the hull. The short block and tackle being used to tension the stay wire to the top mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 05:50:40 PM
 In p249 this can be seen more clearly the way the tackle operates, the rope belaying under the end of the cavil rail and to pin no2 on the cavil rail, the book Sailing Trawlers is a wealth of information, detailing down to the last thole pin what each was for. Photo p250 is just another shot of the same rig from outside of the hull, this also shows the shroud steady bars, which I have located above the seizing of the deadeyes, on further viewing of the book these are incorrect and should actually be just resting on the deadeyes themselves, so another minor alteration to be made.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 05:53:16 PM
 P251 are the navigation lightboards being attached, on the Humber it was customary to have these on the rear shrouds rather than the forward shrouds like most other ports- us northerners like to be different. The starboard one can be seen with a bulldog clip holding it in place while the glue sets, the port one is already in place. These were just a simple oil lamp hung on a clip attached to the board itself. What I cannot fathom is whether the boards were painted white or left natural, all the black and white images in my two books are very blurred when it comes to the detail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 05:55:03 PM
 On to p252 and you can see the top mast stays by the shrouds, the main mast stay to the stem and my failure, the forestay. I made the forestay out of wire the same as the main stay, however it was impossible to tension them both to the same degree, if one was tight without kinks, the other looked slack and vice versa. This I surmised was down to the two masts flexing (even though it has a steel rod up the centre) So I replaced the forestay with a rope one as can be seen in the photo.

While discussing the bowsprit I have noticed in modern photo's to be found on the internet how many of the surviving craft employ a bobstay. Yet in the book there is a quote from an old fisherman that the only time bobstay's were used was in the summer racing competitions amongst owners, ordinary fishing conditions never required one! Which is fortunate because I never intended to have one anyway.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 06:00:22 PM
 Iím almost complete on the standing rigging in fact the forestay is classed as running rigging so I reckon you can say Iíve moved on to the next part! I wanted to begin at the front and work aft, simple! Err not quite. Studying the plans and books the logical place to begin is at the mast and work outward, so the first item on the agenda would be the foresail sheet and halyards. The problem was that the tack is attached by a hook and the clew is attached by another hook, so the halyards and hooks all have to be done together but need the foresail to tension them, hmm, I didnít want to get into sailmaking just yet.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 08, 2014, 06:03:41 PM
 So we move to p253 showing the two hooks, on the right is the simple hook that is shackled to the stem post. The one on the left is known as a long hook and as can be seen is a bar wrapped around a deadeye, the hooks of both directly attaching to the sail corners. The deadeye is attached in the usual way to a second one which in turn is shackled to a bullseye running along the horse. The horse being the iron bar running transverse across the deck, this can be clearly seen way back in p48. In real life the foresail was set and then left to look after itself for the most part, any adjustment being made with the halyard in the deadeyes (some builders/ports used two blocks and lanyard in place of the deadeyes). I have shown how the hooks sit against a paper template in p254, both hooks are moused which is something I am at a loss to understand. If you wire the hooks closed across their mouths, why not just use a U shackle and bolt?
Anyway thatís it for now, hopefully Iíll have figured out the foresail (fears of bringing the wifeís sewing machine out of storage) and have it in place for next time.
 
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on August 08, 2014, 08:50:37 PM
Brian. Why mouse a hook when a D shackle would do the job. Simple, cost the blacksmith can make a hook in no time, buy a shackle, no way.
 I don't mouse the hooks on my models, to much trouble, as I change the sail plan according to the weather. Hammer
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 09, 2014, 06:06:27 PM
Thanks for the answer hammer. Pretty obvious when you understand how shipyards used to work.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:14:35 AM
 Okay letís start with a p255, a bolt of cloth I bought from that emporium of haberdashery in the UK otherwise known as Dunelm Mill. It seemed right at the time but on making up a sail it is too red, so I think Iíll go with a soak in tea with a piece and see how it turns out. Meanwhile letís move on with a test piece.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:19:25 AM
Out with the wife’s sewing machine p256 and a piece of cloth about to become a foresail. Now I am not a novice when it comes to this machine but sewing a triangle? Well, all I can say is its like driving, anyone can pass a driving test but it takes years to learn to drive properly! The result can be seen in p257. A bit of adjustment i.e re-seeming and it was acceptable.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:22:36 AM
 So I had a hemmed triangle shown in p258 against the sail diagram (full size) and a close up in p259 of the bolt rope that I hand stitched to the starboard side of the sail. I then got out my 1mm brass eyelets and added one to each corner of the sail, that is, clew, tack and head in correct terminology. I also put them along the luff of the sail p260, Iím not sure they are successful or not, but as this is a test sail to see how things look Iíll see how it goes over the next few days.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:24:19 AM
 Then to p261 this is the uphaul of the foresail belayed off on the cleat of the main mast, also in the photo is the sheet of the foresail, that is, the deadeye rove to the horse on the deck, photoís are wonderful, it wasnít until I studied this one that I realised I had used the wrong diameter rope for the deadeye halyard, this is corrected in later photoís. This oversize halyard is better seen in p262, where it is hooked to the clew of the sail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:25:32 AM
 In p263 is the full sail in position with the eyes hanked to the main mast forestay, the tack rove to the hook in the stem and the halyards hooked into the head, the downhaul halyard hanging loose waiting to be belayed around its cleat. Its been a couple of days and Iím still not sure about those eyelets, they look okay in the photo but up close they seem out of place, maybe itís the colour of the brass? Anyway a long think is in order before I remake this sail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:27:10 AM
 P265 and p266 are the correct halyard size now in place on the sheet deadeyes, one from outside the hull, and the other across the deck, this one shows the coupling to the horse with another pear shackle made up as before from tubing cut in half and rolled to shape. Also in this photo can be seen the end of the uphaul halyard tidied away in loops over its cleat.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:29:38 AM
 Wow p267 a wooden double block seized to a halyard! For no apparent reason other than I didnít at that moment want to make another sail, I began on the main boom topping lift (out of sequence again!) So p268 is the free end seized to the end cap, this goes up to a single block on the starboard cheek of the main mast p269, and down to the double block that is shown in p267. The double block is connected to a single block that is hooked to an eye between the shrouds, its purchase going to the thole pins in the starboard cavil rail, p270.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:31:45 AM
 Now on to p271, I had made up the jib sail mainly because I wanted to try my hand at machining the seams into the sailcloth, I was pretty successful with that. However going back to what I said about mastering techniques, if you view p272 you will see it has misshapen badly especially along the foot of the sail when put under tension. Also even though cut across the bias of the cloth, it had stretched wildly, I re-shaped the head of the sail cutting away almost 25mm but it now looks abysmal p273.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:34:48 AM
 A better sail is shown in p274, against the old one for comparison. Remember at the beginning when I said it was too red? Well in the local Ďwe sell everythingí Chinese store, I found some dark brown cloth dye. I made up the concoction and put my cloth in it. An hour later I took it out to find the burgundy colour. Of course the water colour artist wife then chose to inform me that if I had used the Ďcolour wheelí I would have known that adding green to red would give me brown, I hate a know it all, but I darenít tell her that!
A little more knowledge for those that often wondered why sails were a ruddy brown in colour. It was customary for sails to be soaked/treated with oak bark, the tannin in the bark acted as a preservative on the sails making them last longer before needing replacement.

 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:37:18 AM
 Iíll follow that with p275 a close up of the jib sail showing simulated stitching for the individual panels that make up the sail, also the boltrope on the old sail, p276 is forum member Hammerís brilliant idea for attaching the boltrope to the sail.


 The sail is stretched across the span of a U shape, I used a piece of Perspex because thatís what came to hand first, but a piece of ply works equally well. Cut it to the U shape, stretch your boltrope across the legs of the U and clip in place to stop slippage. Then offer up the sail cloth and stitch the rope to the edge, remembering to get it on the starboard side of the sail. When the rope is released it will return to its un-stretched state, putting a slight belly in the sail cloth for you.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 09:38:25 AM
 Lastly a photo of the increasingly cluttered main mast p277. Next time Iíll include a better photo with all the blocks etc named for clarity.
  So thatís it for now, I start over with my sails and because they take so long to actually make Iíll only post updates when necessary for a while. Its going to be pointless showing a photo of a sail followed by another and another. I will post pertinent parts as and when I come to them, but hopefully try to keep with a weekly update of where I am.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: tigertiger on August 21, 2014, 03:13:30 PM
fantastic build.
I have PMd you.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 22, 2014, 10:56:13 AM
I've sent you a reply Mark. :-))
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on August 22, 2014, 07:35:04 PM
Brian, Looking really good I do like the weathering. I think the brass eyelets look out of place as they are over scale size by quite a bit. Full size would only be about an inch. I show a photo of my method, super glue on  cocktail stick poked into the cloth. On the corners of the sail I but the eyelet in a loop of the bolt rope. Also the white glue prevents the cloth fraying on the edge cuts. I have not been brave enough to stich the joints in the cloth, just pencil I am afraid. Keep up the good work almost there. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 22, 2014, 08:18:00 PM
Hammer I take what you say about the eyelets. However the hole is 1mm diameter, so are actually scale or slightly over (.25mm) its the flange around them that makes them look larger than they are. As it is I have not used them on any of the other sails I have completed so far, having used your idea of the cocktail stick and superglue as you mentioned far earlier in the build.

As it is, I look at the almost completed boat now and see just how superior your build is to mine.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on August 23, 2014, 04:46:48 PM
Brian, Don't even think my model is better than yours. You have made a fabulous job of yours, you can be justifiably proud of her. Of course you like me, know all the little things that aren't quite as we would wish. But don't worry no one else will know. (unless you tell um). Geoff.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:12:17 PM
 Letís start with the mainsail p278, Iíve got this machining down to a tee now, the only thing I regret is actually deciding to machine the seam lines in, that is taking forever with each sail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:15:16 PM
 Then p279 a broad view so far, still in place is the foresail that I have to remake and also the new jib sail from the last article now in place. This view also shows the topping lift on the main boom, the gaff in place with the main and peak halyards now rove through their respective blocks. The lower ends not belayed off yet as some adjustment will be needed once the sails are in place.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:16:56 PM
 P280 and p281 are better views, the main sail now with its registration number airbrushed on to each side of the sail. For this I made a stencil by printing off the number on to thin card and then carefully cutting out the numerals with a scalpel. A couple of light coats of white paint through the airbrush gave a suitably faded effect to the finished number. These two photoís also show the mast hoops laced to the main sail and the oversize lacing of the sail to the gaff, this has been replaced since the photo was taken.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:20:27 PM
 Last time I promised to post photoís of the topmast and name all the halyards and blocks, so lets begin with p282
1.   Lantern halyard
 2/3. Jib sail block and halyard (standing end) reeves up from starboard cavil( kevil) rail, through block 3 to the jib sail and then to block 3 on port side (two blocks either side of mast) then on down to port side cavil rail (fall).
4C/B/A   C is the standing end of the peak halyard, B the interim and A the fall blocks
5.             The peak blocks attached to the wire stays
6/7          Are the main gaff triple and double blocks.
8.             Is the wired main stay to the bow head.
9.            The fall block and halyard for the foresail from port cavil rail.
10.          The hooked block attached to the head of the foresail, the halyard standing end returns to tail eye of block located on starboard side.
11.           The three port shrouds which I didnít re-wind with protective covering to their loops.
12.           The fall halyard of the main blocks that passes under a iron cavil in the deck before belaying to pin on port cavil rail.
Before I leave this photo Iíd just like to quote from the book, these old time mariners certainly were poetic. This is a description of the main blocks as given by the late Skipper, Mr J.T Crouchó
 
Standing end is belayed round second pin in starboard cavil rail, leads under iron cavil in deck, up to treble block on horse, down through double block of tumbler of gaff, REEVING WITH THE SUN, fall goes under iron cavil in port side deck and belays to second pin on port cavil rail, sail hoisted by steam capstan.
What a wonderful turn of phrase. I have no idea what reeving with the sun means so my halyards went through the blocks in what seemed natural!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:23:22 PM
 We move on to the next photo now p283 The starboard side of the mast head, just slightly different from the last photo, here we haveÖÖ
1.      Again the lantern halyards
2.      The jibsail block starboard side
3.     Is the fall of the gaff halyards
4.     The foresail head block and just above it in shadow is the standing end of its halyard on the tail of another block.
5.     Is the downhaul halyard of the foresail
6.     The standing end of the jibsail which is belayed around a pin on the starboard cavil rail
7.     Hiding behind the shroud line is the topping lift block
Also to be seen in the photo but not numbered is to the upper right the black starboard wire backstay. Also the lacing of the the main sail to the gaff. In my haste I picked up a piece of rope that is the correct dimension(1mm) for halyards but not for the lacing, this has been replaced since this photo was taken with 1/2mm and now looks much better.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on August 29, 2014, 12:24:13 PM
 Next up is the topsail and more halyards and blocks- more clutter! And a few more details to add to the gaff and this end should just about be finished, but thatís for the next post.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Duncan on August 29, 2014, 07:50:21 PM
Hi Brian,

REEVING WITH THE SUN

means clockwise, i.e. as the sun rotates round you during the day.

Duncan
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: mrpenguin on August 29, 2014, 11:45:57 PM
Hi Brian,

means clockwise, i.e. as the sun rotates round you during the day.

Duncan


I wonder how this applies if you are in the Southern Hemisphere as it would then mean anticlockwise....????
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Duncan on August 30, 2014, 09:45:11 AM

I wonder how this applies if you are in the Southern Hemisphere as it would then mean anticlockwise....????

It's lucky Captain Cook had decent clocks to prevent confusion down under.  {-)
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:07:59 AM
 As I sat down to finish off rigging the main mast it occurred to me that I had not demonstrated my hooks. Throughout the model there are various blocks that have hooks rather than being stropped, in real life these were swivel hooks attached via iron bands, not something I contemplated at such a small scale, so this is how I did mine.......
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:09:27 AM
 First of all I used fencing wire here, but any wire to the correct gauge will suffice as long as it is fairly stiff. I cut a short length from the roll p284 and then bend it around needle nose pliers p285 to form the offset seen in p286.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:14:32 AM
 Then once you have the offset, adjust the pliers along the offset slightly and continue to roll the wire around the pliers p287. This gives you the hook shape as seen in p288, however it looks what it is, a loop in a piece of round wire. So moving to p289 I grind flats on either side of the hook so that it looks flattened and then shape the hook point, I use a mini drill with a disc for this but it could be hand filed.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:15:46 AM
 Finally it is cut from the length of wire seen in p290, all that is left now is to drill the correct size hole in the end of the block in use and epoxy it in place. Hooks are not only used on blocks like this, but are also stropped via an eye and also attached to various halyards via an eye, this is how I do those.......
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:20:11 AM
 Begin by following steps outline up to p289, but rather than cutting free from the length of wire do these extra steps. Taking the pliers once again, hold the hook part in ordinary pliers and form a Ďshepherds crookí loop just above the hook p291. Then separate it from the length of wire, continue to roll the wire over using the needle nose pliers p292.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:22:21 AM
 
 You end up with what is shown in p293, it may be possible to roll the wire to the complete loop, but if not gently squeeze closed with a normal pair of pliers. But it still looks wrong, if not done already grind the flats on the hook and squeeze closed some more if required. Then take hold of the hook with one pair of pliers and the eye with a second pair. Slowly twist through 90į, as can be seen in p294 this gives a much more pleasing finish to the article.
 

 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:27:59 AM
Okay back to the boat, p295 and we have the topsail in place along with its topsail yard, I think I have this rigged correctly, I have read lots of reference material most of it clear as mud on how it was hoisted etc but not much on how it (the yard) was bent to the sail, p296 and p297. So I opted to lace it on much the same as the main sail is to the gaff.




 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:30:45 AM
Finishing off the rigging for the mainmastwe have p298 which is the single block and hook for the forward fish tackle, this is secured to an eye in the deck just forward of the port net door. The upper double block is in p299, this is attached to the port mast cheek via a strop or chain, I chose chain because I had some of the correct size left over from attaching the topsail yard.

 Also to the lower right of the highlighted oval can be seen the sheet block for the topsail, the sheet running from this to the end of the gaff and attaching to the sail via a shieve, the running end of the sheet being secured on the aft face of the main mast.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:43:22 AM
Moving to starboard and we have the double block truss attached to the middle shroud line p300. This runs down to a single hooked block p301 shown hiding behind its purchase, still waiting for final attachment. This tackle was used for recovering the ships boat and was either secured to an eyebolt in the deck or casually attached to the gooseneck. I went with the eyebolt thinking it may restrict the movement of the sail and boom.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 09:48:16 AM
I do have another instalment to post later this week but that will be it for a couple of weeks. We have to do the obligatory return to the UK so I will only have access via my tablet, all modelling stuff is left in Spain for when we return later in October. When hopefully I will be into the finishing stages of this build.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on September 11, 2014, 10:23:09 AM
Very impressed Brian. Have you used chain from a model shop? I have found this snaps as the links are only bent around and the ends not joined. I use cheep necklace chain this takes the strain. I make the hooks from copper electrical wire, not strong enough? Well when I hammer it out to a point the copper will harden.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 11, 2014, 07:46:22 PM
Same as you hammer, I bought cheap jewelry chain in the local '1 euro shop' :}
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on September 11, 2014, 07:50:49 PM
I might have known you are on the ball.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 12, 2014, 06:37:17 PM
I walk into shops nowadays and my first thought is, 'is there anything I can use on models'  {-)
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:29:30 AM
So on to the last update for a couple of weeks due to my return to the UK, we are now on to the mizzen mast and we’ll start with p302. This has the mizzen gaff in place with its peak halyards and gaff halyard in place. A close up is shown in p303, the lower of the peak strops here has a kink in it. I had to replace this strop and it has not been straightened or painted after slotting  on to the gaff yet.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:31:23 AM
 On to p304, this is the lower end of the mizzen topping lift, essentially a copy of the main topping lift, it is belayed to the starboard mizzen cavil rail, here shown with its excess halyard held to the belaying pin with a loop in the halyard as are all the Ďtailsí of the various ropes around the boat. In p305 is the running end of the mizzen gaff halyard, but in this case rather than being belayed to a cleat at the foot of the mast, it is taken to a pin in situated in the port cavil rail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:32:58 AM
 Next is p305a the hooked block of the aft fish tackle, this is secured to an eye in the deck aft of the dandy wink, the running end secured to the end of the port cavil rail or belayed around a thole pin in the capping rail. 305b is just the double block of the fish tackle mounted to the Ďspider bandí of the mizzen.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:34:29 AM
 Almost done with the rigging, p306 is the topping lift block still with slack in the rope because it is unsecured in the photo. Then p306a is the double block of the purchase for the topping lift down to the single block at the starboard rail.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:35:47 AM
 So p307 is the first glimpse of the boat with its full suit of sailís in place oooooohh! However it still has the pesky foresail that I keep promising to replace ( this has now been done and will feature in the next set of photosí)
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:38:18 AM
 Following my usual practice of getting bored and moving on, I began work on the ships boat, a vital addition as it was used for ferrying fish boxes to the carrier for return to port and the waiting fish markets. In p309 is the beginnings of my plug. I sandwiched between to 25mm square lengths of pine a piece of 2mm card. Then to the top of it I stuck a plan of the boat and along one side I stuck a profile of the boat, the plan can just be seen in the pic. I then put the assembly through my band saw to rough out the shape of the boat according to the plan and profile. This gives to halves that fall apart as the only thing holding them together at the end is the thin plan stuck to the top, this is ok as the two halves are now separated.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:40:24 AM
 The card in the centre is replaced with a new piece so that it protrudes  along the bottom and in place of the plan is screwed a piece of ply, again p309 and p310. This card will form the keel of the boat in the final article. Yes the boat will be made of card, its easer to work as the boat is clinker built and no way was I going to attempt to do that with timber at this small a size!
 
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:42:55 AM
 So p311 shows the plug sanded to shape and ready for the next stage, I used some vegetable oil on the wood as a release agent for later removal of the boat shell. Also can be seen the rough shape of the card keel, this will be sanded to final shape once it is out of the plug. Then finally p312, the thin strips of card I cut to form the clinker hull, all in place on the plug, I see from the photo that the top one has come up short by about a mm, easily fixed at the next stage.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:44:35 AM
 OK letís carry on with p313, as you can see the ribs have now been added to the inner hull and its beginning to look the part, also to be seen here is the duckboard in the bottom. In the North Sea fishing grounds these boats were rowed over to the carrier. However the 1st and 2nd hands who undertook this rowing never sat down, it was all done standing up to get greater leverage on the overlong oars that they used.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:46:08 AM
 Next up was the capping rail p314, this was made from one piece of sheet mahogany again because this was  the thickness I needed and not because it was mahogany! I drew around the outside of the upturned hull direct on to the timber giving me an outline. This was cut on my bandsaw and sanded to final dimension. Then using a compass set to 4mm I used the edge to scribe the inner line. Using a coping saw I cut the centre out giving me in effect a Ďloopí of timber. However this was flat and the boat has a distinct curve to the sides! So into a container of water and into the microwave for 5 minutes. It came out suitably hot and flexible, each end was supported on 10mm blocks and a litre bottle of water laid across the centre. Thirty minutes later it had dried and kept the curve in it. This piece was then glued all around the hull.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:48:25 AM
 Then p315 and you can see the longitudinal stringers two per side glued in on the frames, these are coffee stirrers cut lengthways. Itís almost complete now, p316 and p317 show it in primer paint, there has been three cross pieces added, these were to add strength but could be used as rowing benches should the need arise. I have two boxes to add, at the stern and in the bow. These old ship owners were resourceful if nothing else. The boxes are galvanised steel boxes completed sealed to act as buoyancy devices should the boat be swamped. You might lose your two crew to drowning but at least you could recover the ships boat!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 13, 2014, 08:51:08 AM
And that's it for now, back to it some time in October. We are off to catch the plane home in 2hours so it will be a couple of weeks before I can get back to it and finish the ships boat or as they were known, the punt, at least the trip allows me to get in fresh supplies to return with!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: John W E on September 13, 2014, 03:53:21 PM
hi ya Bryan 56

You know what, you know how to upset people  {-) {-) {-) {-) {-) {-) {-) - I have an empty workbench - plans all over the place - trying to decide on my next build.   Decided on one model - read the Bluebird topic, thought about that - and now what do what I see - good read of your topic and very impressed to say the least with your build.

Now I am fancying trying to build a sailing ship - I have never built a sailing ship before :-)

I have the plans for the Humber Smack myself - and pondering over it now -

what a cracking build of yours this is.

aye

John
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on September 13, 2014, 05:33:22 PM
Go for it John.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on September 14, 2014, 11:02:27 AM
Ah back in the UK, seems quite chilly here {-) John all I can say is have a go. This was my first model back after a 30 year hiatus and my very first sailing ship, until this I had always concentrated on ORSV's. Its been a rewarding if long build, I'm used to fiinishing a model in weeks, not a year +!

I'm already planning what to build next, do I refurbish my last ORSV which is badly in need of a rebuild or do I go for another sailing ship?? Whichever it will be I am also going to do the Black Pig (Captain Pugwash :-)) ) but only a small model maybe 8-10 inches, basically so I can build on my lap in the lounge during the winter months, I plan this on being as comical as the cartoon depiction and not what a real square rigger looks like.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:06:25 PM
OK  we are back in Spain and I have had a couple of days when I could get on with the build. I'll finish off with the punt, first up is p318 a view of the inside and it now has some paint on, the beginnings of the weathering on the inside the paint worn off the duckboards and showing bare pine through although it needs toning down a little. P319 is a bow shot and p320 upturned with once again the salt weathering on the white paint to simulate the dragging and rubbing of the punt hull on the deck.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:08:37 PM
 Then p321 and p322 are just two more views from other angles to show the overall effect.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:09:43 PM
 Propulsion, a boat needs oars, I began with 3mm square oak strip and sanded down until the correct round profile was obtained, this allowed me to narrow the Ďpolesí in the correct areas. My problem next was the blades of the oars, anything made of timber was too thick, get it down to the correct thickness and it was too fragile, card was the same. So for the first time in this model I used plasticard of 0.5mm thickness, p323. These were attached by cutting a slot up the centre of the plasticard for the poles to fit into. The end of the pole was notched so that a tenon joint could be formed between the pole and the blade and then the two epoxied together.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:11:02 PM
 P324 are the oars shown together with the punt, they look oversize but are not, they were anything from 15 to 17 feet in length, the punts varied between 18 and 20 feet in length. Moving on to p325 and the blades have now been sanded down to the correct width and profile, just need painting.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:13:14 PM
 Then finally for this little model the oars in place in the punt and fully painted p326. Iíve included an old photo p327 for comparison of the real craft, notice how the 1st and 2nd hands are sculling the boat with an oar each and the casually tossed empty fish trunks (boxes) in the bottom of the punt. So whatís next?
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:14:43 PM
 Thatíll be the Kedge anchor that will, I couldnít source one of the correct size commercially so had to make one. Now the idea was to cast it from some low melting point alloy I still have, the problem was I couldnít find anything in my area of Spain that was fine enough to use as a mould. So p328 shows the beginning of what was the plug but became the finished anchor. I used an offcut of timber with an arc drawn on it, then running a row of panel pins along the arc to make the form. I spread glue on three coffee stirrers and clamped them to the pins.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:16:02 PM
 Once dry it formed a lovely curve for the arms and crown. Then I added the shank p329 and glued that into place, the whole thing was then rough sanded to size. I added the flukes to each end of the arms and rough formed those as well. It can be seen against one of the semi finished crew members p330.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:17:38 PM
 On to p331 and p332, I drilled the stock and used a length of copper wire to form the stock, on to the ends I glued a couple of small beads, the same ones I used for the parrelís on the masts. Also in the pics are the shackle for the anchor chain and a thin braided wire which would carry the pin to hold the stock in place.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:19:05 PM
 Then we have the anchor chain coupled to the anchor with the shackle p333, the anchor chain is cheap jewellery chain. I wiped it with a weak solution of battery acid to remove some of the plating on it, then washed it clean and left it outside in the sun for a few days, the patina on it is natural rust!
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:20:48 PM
 So to finish the anchor it is now painted p334 and p335, here itís hanging from a handy clamp, again with the figure for size comparison. One thing to point out, I have made this with the stock stowed so to speak, I see too many anchors of this type laid on model decks and the arm locked in position. While undoubtedly some real craft did this, it takes up a lot of space and can form a hazard, far better to stow it correctly and lash it to either the winch or the bulwark.
 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 24, 2014, 06:28:18 PM
Well as they say in all the best cartoons....th th that's all folks!

I have still a few little snags to clear up and some tidying of already added parts, but this model is all but completed. As our pool is covered for winter I can't show any on the water shots, so until I find some open water (our nearest reservoir is 50 miles away) I can't show her in action.

Finally I'll finish with a last photo. This shows just how hardy these old seafarers were. Look at them leaning on the rail enjoying a natter between net hauling, not a care in the world, then look at that mounting sea off the port bow!
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: hammer on October 26, 2014, 02:30:24 PM
Really well done Brian. I do like the weathering.   Just put pictures of punts I have made. Made as full size on 2 frames.These for Pilot Cutters, Only one ore. 
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on October 26, 2014, 04:20:38 PM
Nicely done with those punts hammer, the planking looks good not only on the outside but against the framing ribs as well.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Richardjm on November 24, 2014, 05:11:52 PM
At a glance Brian, your Humber smack is very similar to my Lowestoft one but the detail you have got at 1:48 is amazing. My RC one is 1:20 but will still fit in the car when finished provided the topmast and bowsprit are retracted. I guess the anchor to be about 5ft tallish and that suits me fine as I have a Metcalfe whitemetal kit that scales to about that size. Thanks for the help


Richard
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: Brian60 on November 24, 2014, 06:45:39 PM
For the Lowestoft variant check out hammer. He built his Albatross based on the Lowestoft one to 1/20th scale I believe and the amount of detail he has got is stunning.
Title: Re: Humber smack circa 1880- build log
Post by: T33cno on December 19, 2017, 12:42:58 PM
Amazing build  :-)
(http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=46369.0;attach=140118;image)