Model Boat Mayhem

Mess Deck: General Section => Chit-Chat => Topic started by: Bob K on August 21, 2014, 07:20:16 am

Title: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Bob K on August 21, 2014, 07:20:16 am
As a former draughtsman we all converted to Metric way back in 1971.  Using Metric ever since I am often asked "What's that in English" when I quote a distance.  To be obtuse I usually convert it to the original imperial Barleycorns from which our wonderful Imperial Inch was defined in 1324.

This Number Hub video clip nicely explains how the whole Imperial measurement system works . . .
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7x-RGfd0Yk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7x-RGfd0Yk)

At school we had to learn most of these conversions, and how to do long division of Pounds Shillings and Pence.
Few of these units were ever English anyway but ancient foreign imports.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: rob on August 21, 2014, 07:55:47 am
Very good, I like that one.
I must admit to using metric for small work on models, I no longer think 7/32 of an inch, but when it comes to 'how long?' Then it's 61 inches or whatever
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 21, 2014, 08:45:35 am
Hi Rob I agree, small things metric but I need inches etc. for visualizing longer lengths.

Now that I do not have to sell my time to the best bidder.  I think of all my time as my own and one of my favourite time measurements is the "micro-fortnight"  I think in fortnights as this is how long one pack of pills lasts.

The micro-fortnight is slightly longer than the second and so gives you a little more time to do things.  I used to use "half a tick" but at my age that rather lacks the gravitas of the micro-fortnight.

regards Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: raflaunches on August 21, 2014, 08:56:16 am
I, too, use metric for anything below an inch then automatically switch to imperial for all other measurements! And I was born in 1984!!! So well done teachers, I'm born 13 years after decimalisation and I use imperial measurements everyday. Get this though...
I work on an aircraft designed by a consortium of three nations who use metric measurements but the engines are imperial, and strangely two bolts on random parts of the aircraft are imperial too! %%


Someone said to me 'how far is it to Kings Lynn?' So I replied it's about 13 miles, they said 'oh what's that in kilometres?!' To which off the top of my head couldn't answer straight away because like many I suspect we are hard wired to think in imperial for distances and can't visualise a kilometre.


Great link Bob! My dad enjoyed it too! :-))
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Bob K on August 21, 2014, 09:07:12 am
Love the unit Micro-Fortnight  :-))

With increasing distance it is true we tend to switch to Imperial.  ie: A distance I am prepared to walk is in feet because that's what I use to walk.  However if its further than from the car park to lake side then it is in miles 'cause that is what cars are calibrated in.  Strange, Britain never fully converted.

Today I am sailing my little Springer, which for reference is 2.6 deci-fathoms in length  %%
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: rob on August 21, 2014, 09:10:20 am
What's that in barleycorns Bob ?
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Bob K on August 21, 2014, 09:18:26 am
Sorry Rob, should have given that too.  57 Barleycorns
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Arrow5 on August 21, 2014, 09:30:41 am
..and if you ask how far it is from Boston to New York the Americans might say about 6 hours.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: dougal99 on August 21, 2014, 10:09:28 am

  Strange, Britain never fully converted.




On Holiday in the Grand Canyon some years ago I had occasion to explain the mix we use to one of the Rangers. I think he is still in therapy  %%
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: dreadnought72 on August 21, 2014, 10:17:51 am
As a person rooted in Physics, I quite like the

barn.MegaParsec

A barn is approximately equal to the cross sectional area of a Uranium atom. A Mega Parsec is a distance just a bit beyond the Andromeda Galaxy. Multiply them together and you get a volume.

11 of these is a unit of whisky.  :-))

Andy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: davidm1945 on August 21, 2014, 10:32:52 am
When my sons were at school they laughed at me for using imperial measurements - "poor old chap doesn't he know we've gone metric.....?". Then they left uni and both went into aerospace engineering and lo, they had to learn imperial cos the yanks still use it! Old guys rule!!
Dave.

Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: malcolmfrary on August 21, 2014, 10:58:47 am
I do like millimetres for small measurements, feet are good for measuring rooms, yards are for walking, miles for driving.  The mess of numerators and denominators in small measurements in the imperial system really deserves to be replaced, but fractions are good when cutting a cake.
On a visit to Florida I found the habit of showing the distance to the next turnoff in feet rather disconcerting - my brain thinks in yards.  On the other hand, driving in a metric place like Cyprus was very relaxing, road signs and the speedo were in KM, KMpH, my brains were in miles and MpH.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 21, 2014, 11:45:43 am
Hi malcolm, you may have found a use for the kilofoot!
regards Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: rob on August 21, 2014, 12:09:27 pm
Is that kilofoot, related in anyway to Bigfoot. I think we should be told.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: flashtwo on August 21, 2014, 12:26:58 pm
Hi,

I had a similar experience as RAFLAUNCHES.

I spent my apprenticeship in an old power station where the boilers, being British, were imperial, but the 30MW turbines, being Swiss, were metric.

Every day, when jobs were being issued by the foreman, the mechanics would have to sort out their metric/imperial tools to take out on the job depending whether they were working on the turbine or boiler.

I always remember the confusion one day having taken the wrong feeler gauges to work on the turbine - another job for the "gopfer" (go for this/go for that) to return to the workshop for the correct set.

Another time, at an archaeological dig, the director instructed me to dig a 1 metre 6 inch wide trench!

Ian
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Perkasaman2 on August 21, 2014, 01:21:17 pm
How many kilos do each of us weigh.................  :((
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 21, 2014, 02:02:31 pm
Can't get on with metric weight my self, I am 76 millitons and working to get to 74 millitons.
regards Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: GAZOU on August 21, 2014, 02:16:35 pm
The first time when I am come back from Warwick I runs  on the highway and he wrote " PORTSMOUTH 90 " there, I have time ............. I leaddrive friendly and suddenly I understand that they are miles

I do not run drive any more quietly t. I rose in the ferry in extrémis


UK it is in Europe?   %)
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: regiment on August 21, 2014, 02:37:07 pm
 hi what is 1065mm in inches  got to get a band saw in inches
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 21, 2014, 02:39:47 pm
looks like 42 inches.
Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: regiment on August 21, 2014, 02:45:32 pm
thanks very much  now to try to find some to buy the proxxon ones i would have to own the bank.. not just to use it
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: tigertiger on August 21, 2014, 03:02:06 pm
Can't get on with metric weight my self, I am 76 millitons and working to get to 74 millitons.
regards Roy
Roy, is that short tons or long tons?
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: malcolmfrary on August 21, 2014, 05:29:51 pm
"How much is your 2 by 1?"
"We haven't got any, it's metric.  We have 50mm by 25mm"
"OK, how much is your 50 by 25?"
"20 pence a foot"


And, shortly after decimal day, I was in need of some 1/8" bits for pop riveting some bits of car back on.  I was informed that they were now metric, so I asked for 3.3mm drill bits.  The guy behind the counter used his public address system of stock checking by looking over his shoulder and shouting "Charlie, have we any three point three meter drills?".  And the right items turned up.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Netleyned on August 21, 2014, 05:33:14 pm
Roy, is that short tons or long tons?

Or Tonnes :D
Ned
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 21, 2014, 05:35:56 pm
Hi Tiger t, unfortunately long tons.  Did you mean a short ton as 1 Mega grams?
regards Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 21, 2014, 06:00:09 pm
 %)  There used to be a man who had a stall in the market in Rotherhithe (pre metric days) who could work out in his head any money sums, i.e. 12x £1- 6s- 3d without any trouble but could  not read or write, all the other stall holders used shout over to him their bills and he would work it out for them even with half pence or farthings in the sum, I just wonder how he got on with the new metric coinage as I mover away and never saw him again,Ray. ;D ;D   
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Brian60 on August 21, 2014, 06:16:36 pm
Sparky shouldnt that be halfpenny? (half pence was a decimal unit that they soon phased out) or to those that remember it - APE-KNEE  {-)

The farthing was further sub-divided to half farthing and quarter farthing also.
 
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 21, 2014, 06:30:45 pm
 ;)  Your right mate,I stand corrected been a long time since I pennies in my pockets,mind you people then were better at adding up no computerised tills then and a lot more difficult than metric money, had a ten bob note in your pocket and you felt like a millionaire,Ray. %)   
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Colin Bishop on August 21, 2014, 07:00:09 pm
I think the continuing popularity of Imperial reflects the fact that it offers more measurement options than metric, particularly as far as fractions are concerned. as a baby boomer I'm happy to take the best of both worlds. Keeps the brain active!

Colin
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Bob K on August 21, 2014, 07:25:37 pm
On further research I found the Barleycorn remains in official use, in measuring UK and Irish shoe sizes.  From a nominal maximum size 13 (13") downwards each full size is one Barleycorn less in length.

An Acre was the maximum that could be ploughed by a single oxen in one day, a Hyde the amount able to be ploughed in a year.

A Sheppy was defined by Douglas Adams as the minimum distance at which sheep look picturesque, stated to be 1.4km.

1 milliHelen;  Helen of Troy was of such beauty that history states her face launched a thousand ships. Thus a milliHelen is a unit of beauty capable of launching one ship.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: NoNuFink on August 21, 2014, 08:29:42 pm
Does anyone measure air/steam pressure in stones per acre? %%
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Grumpy Dave on August 21, 2014, 08:46:14 pm
Being British we do and use what suits us best. In industry we are usually told what to use, but the rest of the time its whatever suits, 3ft10mm works for me. But all the Imperial measurements were human based. Arm, hand, joint etc . Good for life. In the water industry I do like Metric volumes though M/cu Ltr at work. And miles per gallon. Crazy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Z750Jay on August 21, 2014, 10:15:37 pm
I am totally metric - unfortunately the Dockyard is still mired in Imperial so I am constantly having to convert for my workmates over to age of 30.  Those under 30 find Imperial very wierd and have to ask me to convert what the old boys are asking into metric. Lucky I have unlimited data on my phone so I can Google the conversion - I know it's cheating but apart from 1 inch = 25.4 mm (or there about) I can never remember


Still order pints of beer as the bar staff get confused when you ask for a large beer.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: CGAux26 on August 21, 2014, 10:38:17 pm
How long is a Springer in furlongs?  And how fast is it in furlongs/fortnight?????   :o %)
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Z750Jay on August 21, 2014, 10:59:06 pm
Furlongs, hmmm is that to do with chest hair?
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: CGAux26 on August 21, 2014, 11:06:52 pm
A woman who is one millihelen must be equal to one bugly itch.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Neil on August 22, 2014, 12:35:11 am
As a person rooted in Physics, I quite like the

barn.MegaParsec

A barn is approximately equal to the cross sectional area of a Uranium atom. A Mega Parsec is a distance just a bit beyond the Andromeda Galaxy. Multiply them together and you get a volume.

11 of these is a unit of whisky.  :-))

Andy

think you've had one too many units tonight andy,..........or is that mega parsecs  {-) {-) {-) %% %% %% %% %% %% %%
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: john44 on August 22, 2014, 09:36:51 am
Betting odds have remained as fractions,15/2, 1/4,3/1 etc.


John
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: U-33 on August 22, 2014, 09:45:38 am
I was born and raised on pounds, shillings and pence...feet and inches, I still travel in miles per hour, and buy my food in pounds and ounces.


I've tried hard to get into these here new fangled things, and given up...it's all wrong to me to ask for a kilo of potatoes. I still go in to the pub and ask for a pint of Guinness... %)


If (IF) I have to use these foreign terms I rely on Google Converter...


I'm British and proud of it!


Rich
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: flashtwo on August 22, 2014, 09:49:28 am
Hi,

I have to confess that on my Edwardian Steam Launch, I have a digital display that I have programed to show the steam pressure in kiloPascals (kPa) one of the reasons being that it avoided using a (wasted) decimal point than if I displayed the pressure in Bar. I supposed I wanted to use Bar instead of psi, because I spent the last twenty years in a fully metric power station.

Moving from older to power stations to the more modern ones, you had to be cautious on the high pressure systems especially when previously the boiler pressure gauges would indicate
2500 psi and then the new power station equivalent gauge would be showing 170 for the same pressure. Somehow the number 2500 made you more cautious than the measely 170.

Ian
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Z750Jay on August 22, 2014, 10:01:15 am
Have to laugh - while clearing the last draw of old junk in my bench at work I found a booklet.
"The Chief Executive Royal Dockyards Guide to Metric"
Strangely enough it is in mint condition!
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Brian60 on August 22, 2014, 11:08:39 am
I was born and raised on pounds, shillings and pence...feet and inches, I still travel in miles per hour, and buy my food in pounds and ounces.


I've tried hard to get into these here new fangled things, and given up...it's all wrong to me to ask for a kilo of potatoes. I still go in to the pub and ask for a pint of Guinness... %)


If (IF) I have to use these foreign terms I rely on Google Converter...


I'm British and proud of it!


Rich

Same here we must be of similar age.

However living part of the year in Spain makes for oddities cropping up, for instance go in the local and asking for a pint of beer is a no-no, it's either cerveza grande (big beer) which is about 1/2 a litre, this depends on the glasses they have and not the liquid quantity!
Or for a definate 1/2 litre you have to ask for a cerveza tanke- which is actually the glass it being similar to the imperial tankard. %%
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: GAZOU on August 22, 2014, 11:28:58 am
 <:(

Do not get tired to try to understand the metric system (it is true that it is very complicated)

Soon the world is going to pass in that:



 http://www.chine-informations.com/guide/unites-de-mesure-chinoises-systeme-shi_1354.html
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: derekwarner on August 22, 2014, 11:51:06 am
 :o ...clearly we see GAZOU that China has embraced a "ten fold....or metric system" which is intelligent if not brilliant  :-))......however I only see the volumes of liquid that directly relate to Western units......

1 gě 合 = env. 1 dl
1 shēng 升 (10 gě) = env. 1 litre
1 dǒu 斗 (10 shēng) = env. 10 litres

So from this we see that China can produce a dǒu 斗 container of liquid & they will dual mark it ......... 1 dǒu 斗 - 10 litres"   O0

Derek
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: grendel on August 22, 2014, 12:51:17 pm
Roy, is that short tons or long tons?

Or Tuns (252 gallon barrels)
:-)
Grendel
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: grendel on August 22, 2014, 12:56:05 pm
How long is a Springer in furlongs?  And how fast is it in furlongs/fortnight?????   :o %)
Surely being nautical the distances should be in fathoms
Grendel
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: grendel on August 22, 2014, 01:01:41 pm
Betting odds have remained as fractions,15/2, 1/4,3/1 etc.


John
we had an argument here in the office over betting odds, between one of our UK guys and one originating from foreign parts, apparently in Poland the odds are calculated as a percentage, and don't include the original stake, while here they are as fractions with the original stake included (or some such thing - I've never understood betting).
Grendel
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: dougal99 on August 22, 2014, 01:49:29 pm
Are betting odds fractions or ratios? Your starter for 10
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: tigertiger on August 22, 2014, 02:27:41 pm
Hi Tiger t, unfortunately long tons.  Did you mean a short ton as 1 Mega grams?
regards Roy


Short ton is 2000 lbs, an American ton. Unlike the British ton, at 2240 lbs.


US tons, like their pints, a short measure.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 22, 2014, 03:05:27 pm
 :-)) Gallon too only 6 pints always thought they were a bit dodgy,sorry American guys only joking, I still have to divide kilo's by 2.2 to make sense of the weight involved also when I fill the car up multiply ltrs by 4.54 to  get gallons you get a shock when you find out how much a gallon of petrol now costs,when I got my first motorcycle it 4s-9d a gallon  not 6 quid,Ray {-) {-)   
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Netleyned on August 22, 2014, 03:40:00 pm
Did you get free shots of Redex Ray?

Ned
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 22, 2014, 04:06:33 pm
 :-)) Sure did,do you remember the 2 stroke pumps where you had to set the ratio of oil to petrol and pump it by hand, all the scooter boys used to use it on a Friday night for the weekend, I had to the high oct. stuff on the Vellocette would pink like hell if I used anything else, if I remember right it had a compression ratio of about 10.5:1 had a lot of Vello's and Nortons loved em all,Ray. :-))   
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: dougal99 on August 22, 2014, 04:15:04 pm
Gallon too only 6 pints always thought they  I still have to divide kilo's by 2.2 to make sense of the weight involved   


I think you'll find that the US gallon has 8 pints but their pint has 16 Fluid ounces not 20 like UK. Also the Kilo is approx 2.2 pounds so to get pounds from Kilos you have to multiply by 2.2 not divide
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Netleyned on August 22, 2014, 04:30:51 pm
Hey Hey Ray :-))
I was a Norton fan 2 Featherbed 99 's
then cobbled a Triton together. Spent
a fortune on oil for that one.
When Honda came on the scene I went
all Itie and all my bikes were Ducatis after that.

Ned
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 22, 2014, 04:50:12 pm
 {-) I had a Norton interstate 850 1973 bought in 1980 had it fifteen years never let me down, never cured oil leaks and brakes could have been better(1 disc front and drum rear) must have kept Castrol in business,kept it in a garage all the time I had it, the good bit was I sold it for more than paid for it,a mate of mine had a Ducati single 350 in the 60s I think that was quite fast,Ray. %%     
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: roycv on August 22, 2014, 05:34:44 pm
Hu=i T.T I think I was thinking of a metric ton.  I still weigh my boats in pounds and ounces. 
Just off to play duplocate bridge 10.000 micro fortnights.  Nice partner to look at and a happy evening.  Just hope the computer deals us some nice hands.
regards Roy
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: sparkey on August 22, 2014, 06:07:41 pm
 O0 I think us oldies tend to a bit of both metric and imperial measurement, what suits us for that particular purpose, I use miles and  yards for distance but millimeters for small measurements some the other way round, as long as you get it right that's what matters,like the old cherry about 9 square yards and 9 yards square that's court a few people out over the years,Ray. O0
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: Jonty on August 22, 2014, 09:31:25 pm
In rural France une livre, or pound will buy a half-kilo of spuds, near enough the same thing. And they still measure bicycle frames in pouces or thumbs. As an aside, dix kilos des pommes de terre was code for a litre of illicit calvados

In India before decimalisation a seer was a unit of weight that varied according to which state you were in.
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: john44 on August 22, 2014, 10:03:33 pm
Are betting odds fractions or ratios? Your starter for 10
Ratio,s are the number of times 1 thing contains another.
Fractions have a numerator and a denominator where the numerator can be larger that the denominator
Decimal odds are the most popular odds globally.  Decimal odds show how much
will be gained from a bet of 1 unit.1 unit could mean 1,10 or 100
most decimal odds go out to 2 decimal places for grater accuracy of the odds,
Decimal odds usually include the return unit stake,
e.g. decimal odds of 3.00 returns £30 which is £20 and £10 return stake.

UK bookmakers use fractional odds which express the odds in a different meaning
Fractional odds tell you what profit will be returned from a 1 unit stake as apposed
to how much in total will be returned.
At 5/1 a punter will be paid 5 times the unit stake, if the stake was £10 then the
returns would be £50 + stake= £60.

john
Title: Re: Guide to Imperial Measurents
Post by: GAZOU on August 23, 2014, 08:42:21 am
In France a pound is one half-kilogram that is 500 grams since the adoption of the metric system.

And not 453,59237 as in UK (that was have to be easy to measure)  %)   :o :o :o :o :o :o  {:-{ :(( >:-o

It's true, it is especially used in rural France and by the former(old)

Everybody uses this unit mass to buy except the young people who buy in bag or from the unity(unit) to the great market