Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Mess Deck: General Section => Full Scale Ships => Topic started by: hama on March 31, 2018, 11:20:57 AM

Title: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: hama on March 31, 2018, 11:20:57 AM
Hello!
I had a visit from Scania the other week. We shifted our main engines this autumn on the boat I work on. The Volvos where replaced by four Scanias. This was Scanias first installation of their own after treatment plant. ( Catalytic cleaning, urea known to most as adblue. )
Because of this Scanias market department have done some documentation and two photographers have taken loads of pictures and made a short video.
Here are some of the pictures. They may be shared but not used commercially without permission from Scania.
All the best
Hama
Title: Re: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: Arrow5 on March 31, 2018, 11:27:49 AM
Wonderful photographs Hama.   I must go to the area in winter. Thanks for posting them.
Title: Re: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: hama on March 31, 2018, 01:30:20 PM
Thanks :-))
Let's hope for some ice next year too, the  just come over here!
Hama
Title: Re: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: derekwarner on March 31, 2018, 11:24:59 PM
Beautiful images Hamma :-))........those small width frozen river sections [as shown in the first image] must be a challenge to navigate on......what is the [ballpark] water speed?, and is wind an issue in these conditions?

I found the following from the WEB…………….
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Dalarö is a sister ship to Söderarm and Dalarö. She was built by the Riga Shipyard at Riga in Latvia, with equipment by Moen Slip at Kolvereid in Norway. She is 39.9 metres (131 ft) in length, with a beam of 10.3 metres (34 ft), a draught of 2.85 metres (9 ft 4 in), and a capacity of 500 passengers. Four Volvo diesel engines with a combined power of 1,800 horsepower (1,300 kW) give a speed of 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph).[
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I also see that Soderhamn is however powered by 4 Scania engines with the same 1800 HP total & understand the bottom line is cost of fuel per tonne of cargo [or people] shipped
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In Australia we have fleets of B-Double coal trucks each running 24/7...this could equate each engine to 750,000 km per year

First 500 HP Kenworths, then 650 HP Whites, then 780 HP Scania's & now 780 HP Volvos

So did the Scania engines show a financial advantage over the Volvo...sufficient to meet the conversion cost?.....or were both engines near interchangeable?...or is it a pollution issue/advantage?...Catalytic cleaning?

Derek



Title: Re: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: hama on April 01, 2018, 09:33:48 AM
Thanks Derek!
What looks like a river stretch is just a narrow passage. There is very little current in the archipelago but wind can definitely be a challenge during autumn and winter storms.
We do have running water at our main dock in Stockholm that  can prove a challenge during spring.
As for the new engines, Volvo had a similar 13ltr engine and both required only minor changes to the mounting. I have no knowledge in how the decision was made to choose Scania, but I'm more than happy with their performance. They definitely have more torque than the old ones and it feels good to have low emissions due to catalytic cleaning. We now have a 2qbm storage tank for urea (adblue) and this off course adds to the running costs but this is all due to environmental policies.
Hama
Title: Re: Winter in the archipelago
Post by: hama on April 01, 2018, 11:02:22 AM
A short video from Scanias Instagram.


https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg3boYiggwo/


Hama