Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Mess Deck: General Section => Chit-Chat => Topic started by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 09:44:11 PM

Title: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 09:44:11 PM
When is enough enough?
Turned 61 and donít really need to work but fortunate to be in demand for my skills so currently I can dictate how many hours Iím available. Not many in a PAYE position have such luxury.
Iíve just decided this evening to cut back to strictly Monday Tuesday for them and 5 days for me and wifey.
Itís winter so not really missing much by working and the money is not to be sniffed at.
As the song goes ď Should I stay or should I go now ď



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: dougal99 on January 13, 2019, 10:12:17 PM
How long is the list of jobs to do that your wife undoubtedly has ready?  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 10:21:08 PM
How long is the list of jobs to do that your wife undoubtedly has ready?  {-)
Lately itís one after another and my mother has jumped in too but she gives me wads of cash like it or not  %%  wonít take no for an answer
Normally Iíd do mon tue thu but lately every day not at work is still a day working, Iíve done 1 hr on my build last week  :((
Iím thinking 2 days now so I have a chance at living and if they donít like it just stop all together

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 13, 2019, 10:23:16 PM
Itís a question of balance really.


I retired early following one reorganisation too many but got a decent pension plus redundancy.

Subsequently I picked up freelance work for Model Boats magazine managing their website, covering for the Editor and editing a number of special issues. All this work could be done at times that suited me, mostly in the evening which meant that my days were effectively free. If the sun was shining then Mrs B and I would go down to the coast for lunch which we still do. It was a good way of making money from my hobby.

Our other priority was travelling while we could as it takes very little for health conditions for yourself or your partner to seriously cramp your style. Once you pass 60 you tend to start slowing up so if you have a bucket list now is the time to indulge it! Definitely do it while you can. When you are working, taking out a month to tour New Zealand isnít easy but becomes entirely possible once you are off the regular treadmill. At 70, which I have now reached, you tend to think twice about long distance travel as it becomes more of a hassle so your 60s are the time to do all those things you were intending to do someday. That someday has now arrived!


Re Dougal99's post. All those outstanding jobs you couldn't find time for while you were working you will still be unable to find time for, believe me!

Good luck,


Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Bob K on January 13, 2019, 10:23:24 PM
I was made redundant, then eventually took a part time job at a supermarket to add some extra money and avoid cutting myself off entirely.  I had a good pension from the redundancy settlement.
Finally, at 68, I had had enough and fully retired.  Having five years part time lessened the sudden transition to full time house-worker and part time model maker.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: 16-21 on January 13, 2019, 10:33:33 PM
Andy,

A work colleague of my uncle
Worked on after retirement and at 67
Decided to retire
1 month later he was diagnosed with cancer
and sadly passed away 6 months later.
He could have retired early and choose not to.

A bit doom and gloom but,
If you can retire early and have enough cash to keep
You in comfort then go for it.
None of us know whatís around the corner enjoy yourself.

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 10:47:00 PM
Andy,

A work colleague of my uncle
Worked on after retirement and at 67
Decided to retire
1 month later he was diagnosed with cancer
and sadly passed away 6 months later.
He could have retired early and choose not to.

A bit doom and gloom but,
If you can retire early and have enough cash to keep
You in comfort then go for it.
None of us know whatís around the corner enjoy yourself.


That is exactly my and my wifeís dilemma
She recently got early retirement through redundancy with reasonable pension.
She knows personally too many people who have had a stroke or gone completely and feels I should not be going to work.
Hence todayís decision to for the time being only do 2 days and come the better weather / tax year end call it a day and get on with travelling and leisure
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: 16-21 on January 13, 2019, 10:51:12 PM
Sounds like a good plan.
Pity you canít do Tuesday Wednesday
And then have a long weekend
For boat shows etc..



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 10:57:48 PM
Sounds like a good plan.
Pity you canít do Tuesday Wednesday
And then have a long weekend
For boat shows etc..


I can but wife likes 2 for 1 cinema tickets  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 13, 2019, 10:58:21 PM
Big early retirement opportunity came up and as wife's health was getting worse  took it. Was 58 and  done 30 years continuous shift in chemical process industry after 1 year took  early morning job for a couple of hours. Stopped after 5 years as she got much worse and lost her that year. Gave it a rest for 3 years and started back again silence was driving me nuts.Since then had both knees replaced surprise heart attack in 2014 cholesterol only 2.8 on admission and this year god willing I might just retire on reaching 4 score getting up at 5 mon to friday is beginning to tell methinksNo Andy you never know what's round the cornerJay
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 13, 2019, 11:01:09 PM
April isn't far away. Thanks for the replies  :-)  I will give it up week 52  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on January 13, 2019, 11:21:51 PM
Don't let age stop you travelling, I am off to Oz in a month's time to get a bit of extra summer.  Not got as much energy as I used to have but the fitter you keep the more energy you have.  I hope to be getting on the bike and walking in the sand and sea.  I also have a lot of model boats to finish.
Regards,
 Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on January 13, 2019, 11:38:12 PM
You will be welcome in Oz but remember the sun cream and a hat.
We are having a really hot summer especially anywhere north of Melbourne.
p.s. Watch out for the jellyfish if you go swimming in the sea north of Sydney.  They are very bad this year.  <:(
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on January 13, 2019, 11:41:58 PM
Hi Brian thanks for the heads up on that I go swimming in Brisbane Water half a mile up from the Rip bridge.

 My beach of choice is Umina.
regrds Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: 16-21 on January 14, 2019, 12:01:29 AM
2 for 1 tickets  :-))

Andy,
Iím 40 soon
But in 2016 i had 11 Cardiac arrests in 1 day (12 in total)
Started at the back of 7am
And finished at 14.30
Woke up to see the mrs and my oldman at the bed side.
I do remember some of the bits in between
Incl them zapping me with the defib.
Ruddy painful experience that was.

Ended up with minor brain damage
Affecting my short time memory and fatigue.
I was paid off due to my hgv licence being taken away.
I get nothing but shortness of breath when doing things
And Iím still trying to get back to some kind of work.

As folks have said you never know whatís around the corner.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: nmbrook on January 14, 2019, 12:13:54 AM

My take is as soon as financially possible.I am only 47 and have friends who have had heart attacks,most survived.One didn't and he was 39.My Oldman died of cancer at 61 and my father in law worked until 78!.He had his own haulage business and passed away not long into retirement.
Unfortuneately for me,I feel 65 will be the earliest I can do it.


Regards


Nigel
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Jerry C on January 14, 2019, 01:51:02 AM
I retired at 62, wife took early retirement (nhs) and went back part time. Used lump sum to buy Narrowboat. When boat was sorted out and equipped for continuous cruising Mary stopped working altogether and we let the house out.
We cruise canals for 6 months and winter in Canberra staying with daughter and family.
Wife had heart attack just before our return in April last year. She stayed in Oz as not fit to travel. I returned to boat for 6 months. Now half way through my time in Oz and we return to boat end of April.
Iím 69 now and just done the …tape Australia again and got early bird entry to this years event.
My advice would be to retire as soon as you are able to cos you never know whatís around the corner. Live every day as if itís your last.
Jerry C.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on January 14, 2019, 05:18:22 AM
I had redundancy at age 51, took a year off, then did a year on a zero hours contract, that didnt work out as I wasnt getting enough to supplement my small pension from the redundancy, so I went back to work, took a job doing similar work to that I had been doing but in a junior position (I went from a drawing office manager to an engineering support officer - basically the same CAD work, but none of the responsibilities or stress)
so basically now I go to work to relax and wind down and to get away from the house during the day. I would possibly consider dropping back the days at some point - if only to cut down on the travelling.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 14, 2019, 06:16:32 AM
Great replies reading as I ready for work today  :((
Thank you
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on January 14, 2019, 07:53:11 AM
I am now at work, and had a thought, which is that you dont want to retire then find yourself working harder at all those jobs at home than you did when you were at work.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 14, 2019, 07:57:51 AM
I've known more people drop dead just before retirement or soon after than I can shake a stick at.

You only get one life so as long as you have things to do to keep you fit and your brain working and can afford it, then retire as soon as possible. Unless you're doing what you love, working really is for mugs with no imagination.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on January 14, 2019, 08:02:29 AM
I've known more people drop dead just before retirement or soon after than I can shake a stick at.

You only get one life so as long as you have things to do to keep you fit and your brain working and can afford it, then retire as soon as possible. Unless you're doing what you love, working really is for mugs with no imagination.
this is where I get the benefit of a job at the bottom of the responsibility chain, I have no responsibilities or stress and am doing the bit of the work that I love most, so work for me is a happy relaxing time.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 14, 2019, 08:03:43 AM
Then you have it all.  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 14, 2019, 09:07:49 AM
I've known more people drop dead just before retirement or soon after than I can shake a stick at.

You only get one life so as long as you have things to do to keep you fit and your brain working and can afford it, then retire as soon as possible. Unless you're doing what you love, working really is for mugs with no imagination.

I Knew people who topped themselves  within a few days of normal retirement  two  who were particularly good friends of mine. One being  my shift fitter the other an instrument mechanic . No reason for this came out

The old saying careful what you wish for  could apply Equally to  what  advice one gives
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: terry horton on January 14, 2019, 09:56:38 AM
I retired at 63 ....four years ago and just before Christmas ...not the best of times !


My wife showed great concern at what I would end up doing in my "spare" time.
I had my model building of course but the  the expected cold of the  winter months put me off being in the shed for lengthy periods.


We both investigated the "University of the 3rd Age"..... a non academic national organisation for retirees. and part time workers... to see what pastimes they had on their local curriculum.


We both joined their Field Archery Group with no experience of the sport at all..... I now run the Group with shoots twice a week in local woodland and field with standard targets and  3D rubber animals..... an absolutely great and "different" hobby . 
I joined the Petanque  Group which I thoroughly enjoy throughout the year.
I'm about to start a Tai Chi Group which I've been practicing for 18 years , so hopefully my knowledge can be passed on in a beneficial  way.


All this activity from someone who has had no interest in sport throughout his life.
My wife has  also joined the U3A art groups, quilting, scrap booking and Nordic walking...... all greatly beneficial and a source of new friendships.


Within most of these groups someone often organises lunches and trips to different venues to enhance the enjoyment  and this past Christmas period has seen us invited to more social occasions than we ever had when working.


I would highly recommend anyone struggling with impending retirement to investigate the U3A as a potential for new adventures and friendships.... with retirement you have to keep visible !


Regards
Terry H
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 14, 2019, 09:59:37 AM
Have a look at Meetup.com for local social groups.
I'm a member of some techy groups, coffee meets, meals out, bowling, pub evenings, pub quizzes etc. Or you could start your own special interest meetup group.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on January 14, 2019, 10:01:06 AM
Hi all, looks like most working people will have two careers at least.  Grendel seems to have struck a nice balance, perhaps found out what it is like to be in charge, maybe the personal cost was too high?  But is now doing the work he was attracted to in the first place.  When I was working I did feel frustrated that I could run things better than just passing down the actions from above.
I did for a short period have the ideal job for me about 3 years, then age starts to single you out on the basis that I could be replaced by someone cheaper.
One also has to accept that one's own time has passed.  The whole unit of guys I was working with were made redundant, I was not that unhappy about leaving after 31 years.  It came as a shock as I had been working late the previous day, (unpaid overtime).  On receiving the 'white envelope' across the desk a whole weight slid off my shoulders!

After resettling myself to the new way of living and when this happened there were no jobs. (1992). I went through the various government training initiatives, well meaning but not very effective, I had a short teaching job for a while then the company was taken over.  I had another job almost sown up with a local electonics company when a part of BAe suddenly unloaded better qualified and younger men into the work place. 

I worked out how to improve my own life and did just that.  My pension gave me most of what i had when at work, I did later work part time for two years in an Infant School as a Learning support assistant and that was very enjoyable and then their cutbacks meant the end of my contract.

I see from previous threads others have had their world dictated to them but if you have choices take them and basically do anything you want with the proviso that it does not harm others.  Never say to yourself I am too old for this.  If you can stay fit in body the rest follows.


I shall not see 80 again I have almost found peace within myself and wish all forum members a long and happy retirement.

Just gone back to my morning bike ride, I will be back later.
Regards Roy

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: John R Haynes on January 14, 2019, 10:33:51 AM
I shall be 73 in a month and still building models for the Americans . Spent 8 months last year building USS Gambier Bay and just about to send across the pond. If I accept all the models people [ US ] wanted I will be building well into my 80's on present list
John R Haynes
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 14, 2019, 11:28:07 AM
It is a lot easier to adapt to retirement if you already have other interests as it gives you the opportunity to effectively switch tracks and develop those interests further. Failing that, as Terry admirably demonstrates above, you need to branch out into new areas and build new interests which keep you active and your brain functioning!

Many people who lack outside interests can feel that their life has effectively come to a stop when they retire and they wake up each morning with a blank day ahead and nothing to get out of bed for. They no longer feel useful. It is these people who are more likely to fall into depression and eventually off the perch.

The other thing which I think is important is to have a particular focus entailing responsibilities. In my case it was magazine deadlines but it could equally be running an interest group as Terry does or even looking after the grandkids. This imposes a valuable degree of discipline and helps structure your life. Otherwise it can be all to easy to get ito the 'I'll do it tomorrow' mindset and let things just drift.

Most people on here do have other interests otherwise you wouldn't be here which is always a good start!

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: canabus on January 14, 2019, 11:58:26 AM
Hi All
Totally right Colin.
As a retired gentleman with hobby interests I would not have time to back to work.
Sorry to use that four letter (work).
Senior- In - Retirement
Canabus
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 14, 2019, 12:16:09 PM
I retired three years ago - and in that time I've rewired the house, replumbed the house, all new central heating, new boiler, new windows, 2-storey rear extension with kitchen/breakfast room, the old kitchen taken back to brick and redone into a utility room, downstairs bathroom back to brick and redone completely, chimney breast removed & floor rebuilt, en-suite bathroom and bedroom created, cupboard under stairs removed, coat cupboard built, all new internal doors, upstairs bathroom redone, new garden wall and a porch built.
The only things I've had people in for is plastering and digging foundations - I've been a busy boy. Don't know how people find time to work.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on January 14, 2019, 12:24:21 PM
I retired three years ago - and in that time I've rewired the house, replumbed the house, all new central heating, new boiler, new windows, 2-storey rear extension with kitchen/breakfast room, the old kitchen taken back to brick and redone into a utility room, downstairs bathroom back to brick and redone completely, chimney breast removed & floor rebuilt, en-suite bathroom and bedroom created, cupboard under stairs removed, coat cupboard built, all new internal doors, upstairs bathroom redone, new garden wall and a porch built.
The only things I've had people in for is plastering and digging foundations - I've been a busy boy. Don't know how people find time to work.

ah all those tasks I am glad i dont have time for as I am busy relaxing at work.
I think my partner leaving was more of an incentive to start up new hobbies (or should that be restart ones I had in my youth), as now i have the freedom to do as i please i have built up my workshop again, started ship modelling and restarted my meccano hobby, and taken to boating holidays on the Broads. I am sure all of these activities will take over when I do retire, as i never seem to have enough time to do them as I wish.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 14, 2019, 12:29:12 PM
I'd loved to have had the cash to pay someone else to do this but I'm having to work on zero budget but I have time - and I'm free (as Mr Humphries once said) so labour = £0
I have health issues that make working 9-5 very difficult so this is the best option - I get to keep fit shifting heavy things and the house is magically improving.
I have a deadline of 2 years to get it all done before we cash-up and downsize/relocate to the country - so I'm also learning new skills.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on January 14, 2019, 01:54:04 PM
People who retire on the basis they will now be able to get out of bed about 10.30 am and flop round in their slippers till it's time to let the telly take over usually do not last more than a couple of years.  Others will keep body and mind active , gentle sport (bowls) social contact and hobbies , even casual unpaid social work and will live into their nineties and be happy.


  PS .   Have we ever had a poll to find out who the the oldest forum member is ? could be done anonymously  O0



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 14, 2019, 01:55:35 PM
Just announced at work that Iím only doing two days now  :-))
Will stop on week 52 for good
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: dougal99 on January 14, 2019, 02:01:07 PM

Can't recommend the U3A too highly. There's a bit of giving as well as receiving which makes you feel good.


https://www.u3a.org.uk/
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Captain Flack on January 14, 2019, 03:04:10 PM
I retired at 50 after 32 years in Fire Service, with a full pension.  I know it sounds cheesy but I really don't know how I fitted a full time job in.  The only difference between then and now is that i do what I want, and not what someone else wants.  That and the Grandson keeps me busy, and happy and able to take on even more hobbies.Don't wait..........if you can afford it then go.  No one knows what waits for us, so enjoy it whilst you can.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 14, 2019, 07:58:30 PM
I retired at 50 after 32 years in Fire Service, with a full pension.  I know it sounds cheesy but I really don't know how I fitted a full time job in.  The only difference between then and now is that i do what I want, and not what someone else wants.  That and the Grandson keeps me busy, and happy and able to take on even more hobbies.Don't wait..........if you can afford it then go.  No one knows what waits for us, so enjoy it whilst you can.
Cheesy it may be but it's a fact that everyone relates to.
After tomorrow there are only 9 x 2 day weeks for me to call it a day. This will max out my premium bonds. Off course a significant win will cause a donation of my factory tool kit to the poor souls still at it  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 14, 2019, 10:39:03 PM
Compare the meerkat just shaved £166 off my car insurance and extended my 2for1 cinema teekets  O0
Stroll on Wednesday  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on January 14, 2019, 11:02:55 PM
Convicts from the First Fleet do not get retirement..as our gift was..Penal Servitude for Life  <*<




Then again, on the other side of the coin, OZ could be considered as retirement from birth   O0  [after bathing those years of lash marks on our backs]


Derek
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 14, 2019, 11:08:13 PM
Yup! It is well known that Aussies are shy retiring types.


Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Howard on January 14, 2019, 11:19:16 PM
you never retire you just leave work and become a gofer go for this go for that any thing the wife forgets.
                         Regards Howard.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on January 14, 2019, 11:28:03 PM
Definitely U3A
My wife's uncle in Mauritius received a Diploma last December.   :-))
He has just turned 103!  O0
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on January 15, 2019, 12:00:50 AM
The best piece of advice when I retired was "Have a Rostered Day Off at least once a week"  :embarrassed:
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on January 15, 2019, 04:17:23 PM
My intention was to retire at 62. Ive had a Civil Service Pension since 60 and wifey was entitled to her just under 2 years later. She should have got her full state pension at 60 as well but she's one of the WASPI's who imvho, has had 6 year pension stolen from her by the Government after paying full NI with no breaks since 1975.
My work dried up 2 years ago and despite looking, no one wants to take on someone 60+ in my line of work.

The last 2 years we've been living on my pension and savings. DWP wont help because we have a little nest egg. Due to a cock up with CS Pensions, they havent implemented her pension yet and it's two months late and counting.
What Im finding is the reduction in income from my previous, is massive. I just cannot go out and buy when I want, not that I spent loads anyway! When wifey's CS Pension comes through, we will be ok but even so, not having her state pension for 6 years and mine also being pushed back by a year, has thrown our financial planning into chaos.
My advice to anyone looking to retire very soon is, make sure you have made all large purchases ie car to see you through retirement \ home improvements \ model kits you want or need etc, before you retire. Make sure your retirement income is going to give you enough to live on and enjoy doing what you do. Yes, you dont need two cars anymore but if you've been used to having two, going to one is a bit of a shock if it needs to go in the garage or you both need to bein different places at similar times.

Depending on how you were employed ie self employed \ employee, may have a massive effect on you being unable to find a little part time job to keep you ticking over.
I worked on a self employed contract basis and employers will not touch me because 'Id get bored doing a menial job' or 'wouldnt like people telling me what to do'! Crackers and I can understand many active retiree's frustration at not being able to get a little job.
If you can afford to retire and have plenty to keep you active, go for it.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Capt Podge on January 15, 2019, 04:32:42 PM
... And then there's the bus pass - used to be able to claim that at 60 - now you can only apply when in receipt of the state pension  >>:-(
... unless you live in London of course  whereby age 60 applies  :-X .


Regards
Ray

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on January 15, 2019, 04:42:33 PM
... And then there's the bus pass - used to be able to claim that at 60 - now you can only apply when in receipt of the state pension  >>:-(
... unless you live in London of course  whereby age 60 applies  :-X .


Regards
Ray


  And no use around here where we have no buses {:-{
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Stan on January 15, 2019, 08:44:59 PM
I have a simple answer  jobs get done Monday to Wednesday and my week end starts on Thursday morning.

Stan
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 15, 2019, 08:46:04 PM
Thatís this week finished
5 days of leisure now  {-)
Tomorrow 4 new tyres and service my car plus dental appointment then a job for mother
Thursday I may get to do something for myself
Friday to the movies and the new film Glass
Weekend yet unplanned  :-))
9 weeks to go
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 19, 2019, 05:18:40 PM
This week I just fitted four new Michelin tyres on my 2009 Berlingo. I spotted a screw in the front tyre which was due for replacement so just did the lot expecting to keep the car until it was ready for the scrappers.
Within two days other events changed my whole train of thought and I've just traded it in for another Berlingo just passed 3yrs old with under 10K miles and mint condition. This should see me to the end of my driving days now and its the XTR 1.6HDi with semi auto ETG6 box £20 road tax 65MPG. They gave me £2300 for my 1.6 petrol base model with 65k miles
A balance of £8750 next Friday. I feel my retirement plan taking shape
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on January 19, 2019, 05:26:05 PM
Should have done the deal before tyre outlay :embarrassed:
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 19, 2019, 05:35:27 PM
Should have done the deal before tyre outlay :embarrassed:
Ned
Don't I know it  {:-{  but I'm very happy with the prospect of the new one and the tyres on that have at least 2 yrs driving left given the low mileage
I just got my insurance down to £173 too but the new one is £348 due to the higher value. The petrol would be £290 road tax this year  %%  so saving £270 there. Swings and roundabouts  :-)



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on January 20, 2019, 02:58:53 PM
This week I just fitted four new Michelin tyres on my 2009 Berlingo. I spotted a screw in the front tyre which was due for replacement so just did the lot expecting to keep the car until it was ready for the scrappers.
Within two days other events changed my whole train of thought and I've just traded it in for another Berlingo just passed 3yrs old with under 10K miles and mint condition. This should see me to the end of my driving days now and its the XTR 1.6HDi with semi auto ETG6 box £20 road tax 65MPG. They gave me £2300 for my 1.6 petrol base model with 65k miles
A balance of £8750 next Friday. I feel my retirement plan taking shape
Diesel, 3 years old with under 10k on the clock? Hmmm DPF problems spring to mind on that especially if you are also going to do low miles. Not sure if this model has active regen of the DPF but if you're only doing short journeys, at journey's end and before turning off the engine, open the door and if you can feel heat or smell something hot, drive around for another 5 or so miles, dont turn off the engine.
This is recommended by HonestJohn of the torygraph BTW.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 20, 2019, 04:07:37 PM
Think it just needs a hard drive once a week  :-))
More frequent oil changes are recommended to keep the turbo oil feeds clean


Also has start stop technology so assume it cuts out in queue and at lights and restarts on accelerator
Euro 6 with adblue I believe
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: johnv on January 20, 2019, 10:29:57 PM
Hi it's John V the trouble with retirement is the bills still Keep coming through the door. And you still need to eat .
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: coch y bonddu on January 20, 2019, 10:53:36 PM
Citroen Berlingo seriously that ain't going to last the electrics are pants on them,,,,just hope and pray the immobiliser doesn't go down on you as the car will be baisicaly rendered usless as you will need a New Ecu ign key door locks etc and then there is NO gtee it will start....the amount of 5yr old ones we have scrapped in the last 12mnths because of the sheer cost of repairing them ...BEST of luck you ARE going to need it,TRY and get an extended warrenty it will be WORTH THE extra




Dave
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 20, 2019, 10:56:41 PM
My trade in is 10 this year and owned it from new without a single fault so far in 65K still original exhaust and battery too
Any car can have issues even rolls royce  {-)
Thanks
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on January 21, 2019, 12:04:05 PM
Hi it's John V the trouble with retirement is the bills still Keep coming through the door. And you still need to eat .
Aint that the truth! And, the bills dont get any smaller!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on January 21, 2019, 12:20:37 PM
Hi as we seemed to have veered across to cars I traded my C-RV in mid November, I had been driving it for 18 years.  Only problem was catalytic converter which rust had stopped it from being welded up again.  The OEM relacement brought the engine management light up, lived with that for 3 years, but last MoT was passed and the examiner said "don't bring her back"! 

Time was the main enemy with rubber getting hardened and chrome starting to fail, and some rust setting in at the cills, did 107K miles.
I took the hint and settled for a 16 plate Yeti 1.2. Automatic (seemless)  L trim level.  Very pleased with it.  Slightly smaller but quiet, comfy, economical and takes my yachts in the back.

RegardsRoy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Tug Fanatic on January 21, 2019, 12:59:53 PM

Citroen Berlingo seriously that ain't going to last the electrics are pants on them,,,,just hope and pray the immobiliser doesn't go down on you as the car will be baisicaly rendered usless as you will need a New Ecu ign key door locks etc and then there is NO gtee it will start....the amount of 5yr old ones we have scrapped in the last 12mnths because of the sheer cost of repairing them ...BEST of luck you ARE going to need it,TRY and get an extended warrenty it will be WORTH THE extra

Dave



Interesting. I have never heard this about this Berlingo immobiliser problem and there is no mention of the problem on the Honest Jon website. As so much of the car is common across other PSA companies, including Citroen & Peugeot, is it essentially an issue for all/ most/ some/ none of the other PSA group cars?



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on January 21, 2019, 01:02:13 PM
I just bought my latest car with 160,000 miles on it- its a volvo v70, mind you the one that it replaced had 265,000 miles on it and still going strong, I would have kept that going but the clutch needed replacing and this newer one came in cheaper.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Tug Fanatic on January 21, 2019, 01:30:50 PM

Volvo for me too. My last example, a 240, was purchased new in 1990 and sold with MOT etc in 2011 - 21 years isn't bad with the only repair being a clutch slave cylinder.


The replacement car was purchased new in 2011, has needed nothing new apart from service items (banging wood furiously) and is, I hope, good for 15 years.


Hopefully sorted out until 2025 by which time I either won't care or they might have sorted out what technology I am allowed & made it reliable. If I had to buy new today I really don't know where I would put my money.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on January 21, 2019, 02:32:08 PM
Mine is a mazda 626, it turns 20 this year i've had it since 2002, same here, not sure what to replace it with, it runs quite smooth is starting to have some rust problems and a new one leaks into the cabin, so I need to find a way of sealing it after the winter season finishes - so about mid april or thereabouts, like a look of the kia sportage or mazda cx or even a volvo, but all attract a high road tax and repair bills, and the need for a large car is diminishing.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 22, 2019, 07:47:57 PM
2 day week plan has gone "boobs" up already  %%  Under pressure to turn out bespoke power boards to fit a dimensionally restricted space. I like the exacting nature of this type of work and the money is welcome just now with upgrading our car


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-9mfKSjx/0/5d49c104/X3/0699A033-FC9F-4E6E-B712-0CD3AE6D0759-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 25, 2019, 10:14:54 PM
I worked 3 days this week so only doing Monday next week.
Lots on just now but Iím resisting more hours despite all on offer.
Having a driving weekend in the new to me berlingo, lindisfarne tomorrow
Our bench
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-sZ6FvVn/0/b5f70b95/X3/10EFB374-008A-4516-AA90-18E12295769B-X3.jpg)


My old berlingo
I canít imagine anything as flexible for load shifting and boats.
In the 9.5 years Iíve used that it never let me down and shifted many tonnes of rubbish and materials
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-trX9gP7/0/08058c81/O/7964F75F-AA4D-489B-9EB7-2AFD029B79DF.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 26, 2019, 05:35:59 PM
Just back from a round trip to Lindisfarne 327miles using cruise control almost exclusively with a 60mph limit apart from overtakes. Trip returned 60mpg average. Not bad for a vehicle about as Aero as a house brick


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-9cHJBNp/0/4968d84b/X3/CD4C4B1D-8584-421B-A4AC-16A779148C73-X3.jpg)


No gear lever makes a lot more space.
DAB radio worked flawlessly, quite a surprise as my other one keeps losing signal for minutes at a time

Picture shows FM source but was on DAB all today
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-5kt2TZ5/0/c9da909e/X3/954776C6-CCED-4617-8E8D-017FB160D92E-X3.jpg)


Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 26, 2019, 06:24:54 PM
You might do better without cruise control if there are any hills as under manual control you tend to ease off on the accelerator whilst the cruise control maintains speed at th expense of fuel consumption.
But maybe you didn't have any hills....
Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 26, 2019, 07:03:25 PM
You might do better without cruise control if there are any hills as under manual control you tend to ease off on the accelerator whilst the cruise control maintains speed at th expense of fuel consumption.
But maybe you didn't have any hills....
Colin
Very few but unlike my 3 litre Ducato Comfortmatic it does not over react by dropping a gear and revving the nuts off.
Best experience I've encountered with cruise to date. Looking ahead up the road I was adjusting the speed with the +/- to compensate for vehicles ahead until it was clear behind without having to hold traffic up.
The cruise really did make minor throttle adjustments just like you would manually and never came out of 6th


I don't think its run in yet either at less than 9,200 miles  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: JimG on January 27, 2019, 01:56:33 PM
You might do better without cruise control if there are any hills as under manual control you tend to ease off on the accelerator whilst the cruise control maintains speed at th expense of fuel consumption.
But maybe you didn't have any hills....
Colin
Plenty of hills up here. I don't ease off the throttle on hills but automatically increase power to keep my speed constant. You must be one of those drivers unable to keep a steady speed but constantly slowing down and speeding up on the slightest incline.  >>:-( I use cruise control where I can and notice little difference in fuel consumption, any increase in power going up hills is probably cancelled out by decrease in power down hill.

Jim
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 27, 2019, 02:25:29 PM
Quote
You must be one of those drivers unable to keep a steady speed but constantly slowing down and speeding up on the slightest incline.

You shouldn't make assumptions like that. I could explain but it isn't worth the bother.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 02:28:29 PM
You shouldn't make assumptions like that. I could explain but it isn't worth the bother.

Colin
Correct I donít slow down and I avoid delaying other traffic
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on January 27, 2019, 03:30:05 PM
The latest cruise control systems are adaptive and use radar to check the speed of the vehicle ahead
and adapt to it.
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 27, 2019, 03:44:55 PM
doubt the Berlingo has adaptive
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 27, 2019, 04:19:25 PM
No, they still seem to be top of the range options. Probably good in those situations when you are in motorway traffic which is running freely but at variable speeds and where standard cruise control needs to be either notched up and down all the time or intermittently disengaged. In those circumstances you might just as well use your right foot.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on January 27, 2019, 04:33:18 PM
9 weeks for me as well but at 3 days a week, been doing that for 4 years. Even with a 4 day weekend I never have enough time for all my interests and DIY etc. so I'm looking forward to the extra time. I'm lucky enough to enjoy my work and have done a few extra months as didnt want to retire going into winter and the extra income has been good.

I've got a Yeti as well, which even though it's diesel I'm going to keep for sometime now, great car and low mileage, and will give it a good blast on a regular basis. I also bought myself a soft top sports car in readiness for my retirement. Got it 4 years ago and its only done 8k. miles so will be using that a lot more. Like others I'm hopping mad that the government has nicked 6 years of my wife's state pension.

Chris
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on January 27, 2019, 05:42:01 PM



   Why not build one of these ? they come in kit form . Would set off the Berlingo a treat


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ref_JnT8QVY&feature=youtu.be
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 05:55:16 PM
Very nice but I leave the Berlingo in the parking place of this when holidaying  :-)
I just need to empty the garage of unnecessary items to get the tug in there  :-))
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Robbie-Rapido/i-SsFKLrB/0/302b1c91/X3/CA_05131409512399-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 06:10:52 PM
I've had a good rummage about the car today and found what I believe to be an element for heated seats
I'm guessing all I need is a switch unit to complete the instal


Element circled here
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-LMHZCBc/0/68da05c5/X3/4950DC06-F799-4CA0-9225-49E6DDEDA3C1-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 07:17:30 PM
I'll look for the switch module connection socket and put a short on it. If the seats get warm I'll buy a switch of my own choice rather than something from the group at an inflated price
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 27, 2019, 07:41:22 PM
I'm only seeing springs and plastic locating pieces.
The heat pad is normally under on top of the foam just under the cover material.Are you sure you're not looking at the wiring for the occupancy sensor for the seatbelt warning/airbag disable system?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 07:48:13 PM
No the metal tubing is the element and if you look carefully both ends have a wire to them and it goes up the seat backs too.
Apparently its common for Berlingo and Partner XTR models to have them fitted but incomplete unless paid for
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on January 27, 2019, 07:51:36 PM
I'm not sure - why would they be heating the space under the seat? How will that heat your bum?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 07:52:46 PM
Heat rises
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 27, 2019, 08:01:45 PM
Very true and you can never be quite sure what is fitted but not connected but the 'element' appears to be held in place by plastic straps which seems a bit odd. Also I thought that the heated seat elements looked more like the ones you find woven into electric blankets. Those look more like oven elements!

In my car when turning on the heated seats the heat is evenly distributed which suggests elements in a pad. Could the wires to your ' elements' simply be some sort of earth return? They look like part of the springing to me but I stand to be corrected.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 08:03:29 PM
Could be right Colin. Anythings a bonus but not disappointed with what I have  :-)


Good as new panorama image
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-kQwh5Mp/0/b1b2c357/X3/2F4B77F4-B7BE-466F-B45A-2650A6D92CFD-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 08:26:23 PM
Best price I can find for oil to go in stock
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TOTAL-Quartz-Ineo-First-0w30-Fully-Synthetic-Engine-Oil-15L-PSA-PEUGEOT/263870480564?_mwBanner=1&ul_ref=https%3A%2F%2Frover.ebay.com%2Frover%2F0%2F0%2F0%3Fmpre%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.ebay.co.uk%252Fulk%252Fitm%252F263870480564%26rvr_id%3D0%26rvr_ts%3D90fca8551680ac1faf22b8a6fff2bd41&ul_noapp=true&pageci=a30bee69-dc17-4c88-a636-bbd7d022c123&epid=4017017089 (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TOTAL-Quartz-Ineo-First-0w30-Fully-Synthetic-Engine-Oil-15L-PSA-PEUGEOT/263870480564?_mwBanner=1&ul_ref=https%3A%2F%2Frover.ebay.com%2Frover%2F0%2F0%2F0%3Fmpre%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.ebay.co.uk%252Fulk%252Fitm%252F263870480564%26rvr_id%3D0%26rvr_ts%3D90fca8551680ac1faf22b8a6fff2bd41&ul_noapp=true&pageci=a30bee69-dc17-4c88-a636-bbd7d022c123&epid=4017017089)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on January 27, 2019, 09:20:23 PM

Cruise control in Retirement?

A yet to be published report from a group of academics in Australia has studied 'cruise control on long road journeys [ a few hours+] on drivers with increased age groups', this suggests that using such devices may be linked to a reduction of mental alertness or awareness O0


This they suggest has a direct correlation to lack of direct stimuli to the brain.......and potential consequences in road accident/incidents


I no longer use my vehicles cruise control function on any journey............


Derek


Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 27, 2019, 09:24:20 PM
Interesting but not the same environment.
The level of traffic in the UK will not allow complacency  {-)  probably more traffic in Yorkshire than the whole of OZ  %%


Like 40 million vehicles in UK in 1/32 of the space of Australia with less than 20 million


Cruising on our roads requires as much concentration in reading the speed of traffic ahead and behind as driving manually but without the need to use accelerator or brakes.
A single tap will alter speed up or down by 1 mph but a long tap will alter speed by 5mph. So 2 long taps gets you from 60 to 70 very quickly. A lot of thought and anticipation goes into successful cruise operation on academic free UK roads  ;) and very stimulating for the grey cells  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 27, 2019, 11:05:28 PM
So 2 long taps gets you from 60 to 70 very quickly  changes down as well?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on January 27, 2019, 11:53:33 PM
Looks like a Charles de Gaul design mascarading as Guy Faulks   {-)


Alternatively. with the addition of a steel tray....you could stop by the roadside & BBQ a few lamb chops :P
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 28, 2019, 06:12:42 AM
On closer inspection I think itís just the seat springs  :o
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 28, 2019, 06:15:27 AM
So 2 long taps gets you from 60 to 70 very quickly  changes down as well?
Yes
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on January 28, 2019, 06:32:32 AM
opps......... my apologies to Messrs de Gaulle & Fawkes for my incorrect spelling typos  :embarrassed:
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on January 28, 2019, 09:06:44 AM

Cruising on our roads requires as much concentration in reading the speed of traffic ahead and behind as driving manually but without the need to use accelerator or brakes.


Precisely!

Intelligent use of  cruise control enables you to concentrate more on the other threats to our existence that exist on our roads.

I used the cruise control on my company supplied cars since the 80s, and back then I was driving 1000 miles/wk. Nowadays I drive a lot less, 17000 miles/yr, but I still use it extensively.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: JimG on January 28, 2019, 12:13:41 PM
I find that the use of cruise control allows me to give more attention to drivers around me as I am no longer spending a lot of my time checking my speed to stay within the speed limit. As a motorcyclist I feel that I am probably giving more attention to what is going on a round me than many car drivers.
Jimj
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on January 28, 2019, 12:44:48 PM
I miss my 2012 Z4 convertible with 8 speed auto gearbox.  <:(
Flappy paddles to change up or down when you wanted a bit of 'fun' and no faffing around with waggly gearstick and clutch. Far more engaging drive, leave it in auto mode at other times so you can concentrate on driving and braking.

Only used cruise on motorways, waste of time on other roads even dual carriageways. Current car (wife's) has cruise but again,only use it on motorways.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on January 28, 2019, 01:02:45 PM
Hi Jimg, as an ex motor cyclist, I think what you say is more with the biker than those who go straight to cars. 

Maybe a bit contraversial but I have often seen drivers turning to talk to passengers when they should have been looking where they were going.  You could not do that on a bike.
 Another thing is peripheral vision.  I remember many years ago on TV some children had an experiment running where they checked adults peripheral vision.  The less angle you had, tied up very well with the car accident rate of the adult.
Easy enough to check and might make the person aware of any problems they were previously unaware of.
Thanks for the info on cruise control, I have it but have never used it and probably will not use it now.
regards

Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on January 28, 2019, 01:05:14 PM

Only used cruise on motorways, waste of time on other roads even dual carriageways. Current car (wife's) has cruise but again,only use it on motorways.


Other opinions are available.......... ok2

I use cruise control on dual carriageways and single ones too, but as the occasion requires.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on January 28, 2019, 01:27:02 PM
The point re periphereal vision is important. DVLA use the Esterman test to measure it. Google for more information.  Most large opticians can give you this if you want.  It is similar to the visual field test you are given for each eye separately in a regular eye checkup but you have both eyes open and the light flashes are brighter.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on January 28, 2019, 01:27:17 PM
About the last dozen or so cars I have owned have all had cruise control, the Merc also had speed limiter.   On the earliest car I tried out the cruise control but hit the problem of what you do with your right foot ?  If you move your foot  back from the acc pedal you loose the sensory location position and if an emergency braking situation arises you loose a vital second ensuing your foot has moved forward on to the brake and not hit the accelerator. If you leave your foot resting against the accelerator you might as well control your speed with it. At least driving thus you are sure of your foot location and know just how much to move it to hit the brake pedal dead centre.
 Also I did not like way that when clicking resume the cars changed down two cogs and accelerated like mad to get back to the set speed. Have not tried the feature on latest cars.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on January 28, 2019, 02:03:45 PM
Other opinions are available.......... ok2

I use cruise control on dual carriageways and single ones too, but as the occasion requires.
Yes they are. But you need reasonably clear dual and single carriageways to use it safely on them imhe. Cant speak for the rest of the country but in the north, I didnt travel regularly enough on clear duals, singles are just to winding with too many junctions. If you have adaptive cruise you'd be ok.
Also, good thing with the auto is you can left foot brake which you should always do when parking or reversing. Once you're used to it, you can even drive at motorway speed using left foot braking. HonestJohn recommends left foot braking for autos parking as well. Some people fell out of their tree last time I suggested it was similar to driving a go kart but hey ho!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 28, 2019, 03:31:07 PM
Having only had automatics for the past 30 odd years I have always  used left foot braking for everything. Anywhere I might need to brake its already over the pedal.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 28, 2019, 03:32:22 PM
My brake pedal is three times as big as the go pedal so hard to miss  %%
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on January 28, 2019, 04:03:17 PM
Having only had automatics for the past 30 odd years I have always  used left foot braking for everything. Anywhere I might need to brake its already over the pedal.


  Me too but as when we visit Spain automatics are difficult to hire I keep to right foot braking . This allows me to adjust easier
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on January 28, 2019, 04:14:54 PM
My brake pedal is three times as big as the go pedal so hard to miss  %%
Apart from thinking time it is  also milliseconds =  X feet travelled before you have moved the  foot over I think it was in Autocar some years back huge write up on actual times that converted me.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 28, 2019, 04:29:44 PM
Sounds very worthy of a trial  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on January 28, 2019, 06:13:35 PM
I always left foot brake with an auto, and right foot brake with a manual. One of my cars is auto and the other isn't so I get to practice both methods.

But I was trained as a test driver in my first job in the motor industry and the instructor drilled that into us. It doesn't go away.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 28, 2019, 06:40:44 PM
That's this week finished! 6 days off and the bad weather is coming  O0
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 29, 2019, 09:05:21 PM
Maybe of interest
Via a caravan club offer I have registered with Pump-King for an Esso fuel discount card
This saves between 5&8p per litre
Pumpking issue the weekly ppl rate every Friday


Handy for those running euro6 that want to prolong the DPF lifespan


https://pump-king.co.uk/welcome (https://pump-king.co.uk/welcome). Caravan club members only




Edit I just heard this weeks price is £125.1ppl for diesel which is very close to supermarket prices
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 29, 2019, 09:15:34 PM
Compare the meerkat cinema teekets tomorrow
Some good films lately
Green book for us this week
Next Wednesday sees the release of Aleta battle angel in 3D
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 29, 2019, 10:21:05 PM
Maybe of interest
Via a caravan club offer I have registered with Pump-King for an Esso fuel discount card
This saves between 5&8p per litre
Pumpking issue the weekly ppl rate every Friday


Handy for those running euro6 that want to prolong the DPF lifespan


https://pump-king.co.uk/welcome (https://pump-king.co.uk/welcome). Caravan club members only




Edit I just heard this weeks price is £125.1ppl for diesel which is very close to supermarket prices


Quote from a motorhome forum I use just now
"Put £70 worth of diesel in my motorhome and Pump king charged me £63.61 , seems good to me.I think Asda may be a penny or so cheaper."
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on January 30, 2019, 05:23:52 PM
Thoroughly enjoyed the film Green Book today. Injects the full range of emotions  :-))
With £8 deducted from our insider card and 241 cinema teekets it cost us 90p entry  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 05, 2019, 12:07:27 AM
I feel fully retired just now as "work" know I'm not interested if it's not full on busy. They'd pay me to stand about but it's not me. So I have a good 10 day stretch at least without any considerations other than what I decide to do when I feel like it  {-)


Feeling good  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 06, 2019, 12:32:10 PM
No work next week either now yeehaa  8)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on February 06, 2019, 12:57:21 PM
I sometimes feel that I could be asleep in the corner, and still earn my wages when woken up just to answer the odd question, at 59 I have many years in the electricity supply business, and even our senior designers come and ask my advice on occasion, yet my official job title is only assistant designer. i do have probably 20 years on the next oldest in the office, so I am probably substitute dad to all of them.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 06, 2019, 02:54:17 PM
Love it  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 06, 2019, 03:19:48 PM
I'm 76 now and some of my old customers STILL phone me with questions about their test systems that I looked after when I was employed. My ex-employers decided that the customers would buy new systems instead of retaining their old ones, and didn't bother to train any engineers on the older stuff.

WRONG!  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on February 08, 2019, 07:17:26 PM
Hi all, our heating packed up yesterday, our heating engineer was there late morning and had to condemn the boiler, he is a friend and showed me the bits that had just deteriorated beyond repair.  Brother who was visiting, retired from same trade agreed.  Got a quote that evening which we 'negotiated'. Expect installation this Thursday.

 Brought in shed convector and other heating into use.  Today an oil filled radiator failed at lunch time. Found and ordered one with Argos which they delivered, installed and was in use 4 and a half hours later.
We fight on regardless, we may be running out of shops but Service has increased no end.
Roy






Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on February 08, 2019, 08:04:15 PM
Bought a dehumidifier for the laundry.  It was delivered by DFD courier , very nice lad seemed quite chirpy.  When I looked at the on-line delivery tracker I was that lads 130th delivery of the day , delivery no 1 was at 10am presumably after he had spent a couple of hours loading. Now, if he only took 5 mins per delivery thats 11 hours with no breaks for refreshments.
 So thats 13 hours of solid graft and he still had a load of parcels in the van . Phew thats criminal.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 08, 2019, 08:07:53 PM
I was going to sell the wifeís car and both use mine but now realised itís barely costing anything to run as I do all repairs and maintenance myself
Insurance renewal came through at £299 but sheís gone online again and found much of her details have changed since having retired
So now just for social and pleasure with me added as a named driver only £199 road tax £155 nothing needs replacing or fixing so may as well keep it
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 09, 2019, 12:13:03 AM
I was going to sell the wifeís car and both use mine but now realised itís barely costing anything to run as I do all repairs and maintenance myself
Insurance renewal came through at £299 but sheís gone online again and found much of her details have changed since having retired
So now just for social and pleasure with me added as a named driver only £199 road tax £155 nothing needs replacing or fixing so may as well keep it
As a consequence she has renewed her meerkat mooveez for another year. So from next week we can do some catching up at the cinema using my 241 teekets tuesday and hers wednesday  O0  retirement is all about dukin n divin  {-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on February 10, 2019, 10:35:40 AM
18 months ago we had 3 cars but since retiring, we dont need 3 so sold 2. The one car we now have only does 2500 to 3000 miles a year. It's just over 3 years old, no road tax and we alternate insurance in each other's name every year to keep our NCDs current (you can go without insurance for just under 3 years while keeping your NCD).
Id go electric, probably with an E Niro if I could afford it.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on February 10, 2019, 10:42:56 AM
we alternate insurance in each other's name every year to keep our NCDs current (you can go without insurance for just under 3 years while keeping your NCD).
good thinking  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RST on February 10, 2019, 06:32:23 PM
I used compare the market and another service once and it gave me such huge problems with unsolicited mail, relentless nuisance phone calls , people chasing me for things.  It took me about 2 years to de-register and block all the harrassment which I was getting which was traced back to a comparison site.  By the way it was traced back to a quotation I went and did which came back with "best value" 8K, so understandably that time I stuck with the existing insurers of sub 500quid.  I have nothing good to say of comparison sites -at best, they usually tell me i'm on the best deal.  If I enter genuine contact details I open up a wole heap of hell on unsolicited and uncontrollable use of my personal details.


Since my father passed away I am increadively protective of my mother.  Thankfully we are such a small family and keep thimgs simple and anti-internat we don't have to worry about much of the stuff you guys have to contend with!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RST on February 10, 2019, 07:00:50 PM
who was it by the way that brought up left foot braking on auto's?

When I first drove an auto it was an "induction of fire" having drove manuals all my life.  The one thing I remember as far as my left foot concerns was "nail it to the floor".  I have had a few auto's since, in fact I have had some high powered cars >300bhp an some smaller autos.

I always checked the user manuals for each and every single car and none of them suggested the use of the left foot.  Also every single auto I have had says when you are sat at the traffic lights, move into park, and use the hand brake accordingly.

I learned on manuals and whhen I learned to drive autos I canhonestly say the best thing I was ever told was keep that left foot "nailed" to the ground.  Whenever I drive an auto now I always remember that.  Left foot has no place.  And I am talking from someone who had a 350 bhp toyota and a 310 hp mercedes down to shopping tolley worthy cars.  I have driven most inbeteween and never seen a case for left foot braking apart from here and I tink it's dangerous to promote it.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 10, 2019, 07:04:19 PM
While owning my newer Berlingo semi auto I have found no circumstance where left foot would be needed.
While in reverse on the level or downhill the car moves by itself just by easing off the brake so no need to touch the accelerator. If reversing uphill accelerator is required but stops as soon as I lift off. No need for two feet
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 10, 2019, 07:06:13 PM
When I hired a car in San Francisco years ago I was used to manuals and instinctively tried to use the left foot for the brake. The agent told me in no uncertain terms to only use the right foot for accellerator and brake. He was right, I've had no problems with autos since.

Re insurance quotes, once you give your details to a comparison site you are on a hiding to nothing, they never leave you alone. Best to check out the better related insurers (who may not be the cheapest but you get the cover you pay for) and deal with them directly.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 10, 2019, 07:14:11 PM
When I hired a car in San Francisco years ago I was used to manuals and instinctively tried to use the left foot for the brake. The agent told me in no uncertain terms to only use the right foot for accellerator and brake. He was right, I've had no problems with autos since.

Re insurance quotes, once you give your details to a comparison site you are on a hiding to nothing, they never leave you alone. Best to check out the better related insurers (who may not be the cheapest but you get the cover you pay for) and deal with them directly.

Colin
Not our personal experience at all with compare the market. They give you a list of quotes in price order and level of cover. Once you accept the one you're happy with the only email is to claim your reward. Cannot fault them and no junk mail.
I chose the AA most recently for best cover /price. Wife's new policy was cheapest with Hastings
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RST on February 10, 2019, 07:37:56 PM
Quote
When I hired a car in San Francisco years ago I was used to manuals and instinctively tried to use the left foot for the brake. The agent told me in no uncertain terms to only use the right foot for accellerator and brake. He was right, I've had no problems with autos since.
....Right foot does it all, inspeakable in my generation to use left foot in an auto on the usual highway.  I am really shocked to hear folk do that, in my learning it repesents an element of uncontrol in the vehicle unless youre Ken Block or anyone needing to "balance pedals" to get the back-end round.
I can think of no circumstance where deviation from the approved guidelines fall secondary to internet rubbish
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on February 10, 2019, 07:43:55 PM
We are currently changing our email address, well still doing it after 6 months - idiotic virgin media cannot apparently get permission off the council to dig a hole, anyway, we are using the new email and everything of importance is moved over, only those where we would always want them to know our address etc. but we still have the old address with BT, so whilst we are still paying for BT (VM wont start until they connect and the new address isn't even with them) we use that for quotes from builders suppliers etc and also still get most spam through the BT account, so the best option is to have two emails One for the necessary and one for the spam makers, simples  %)


As for left foot braking -  it's a question of ability, generally we are all told to use the right foot only, as in a manual - you use the right for accelerator and brake, but if you are comfortable and are capable of having the ability to use the left for braking, then providing you are able to meet the requirements set by DVLA, i.e. to stop in the necessary distance and under control I cannot see why not, I don't have that ability, so use my right when I have driven an automatic, usually I feel like a DVT is about to strike after extended periods of inactivity with my left leg in any car.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 10, 2019, 07:53:07 PM
I've had my NTL email address for over 20 yrs and even with Virgin buying them out they still maintain my original address. I maybe get 2 spams per week so I must be doing something right  %%
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on February 10, 2019, 08:05:40 PM
a couple of times shortly after swappeing between a manual and an automatic, I have automatically stepped on the clutch when slowing down, both times I nearly went through the screen as I stamped on the brake, left foot firmly wedged in a corner after that.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 10, 2019, 08:08:06 PM
a couple of times shortly after swappeing between a manual and an automatic, I have automatically stepped on the clutch when slowing down, both times I nearly went through the screen as I stamped on the brake, left foot firmly wedged in a corner after that.
:-))  Been there and agree


Meanwhile I'm getting more used to Sunday evenings and the complete absence of any notion of Monday morning and that four letter wurd  8)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RST on February 10, 2019, 08:16:50 PM
Quote
When I hired a car in San Francisco years ago I was used to manuals and instinctively tried to use the left foot for the brake. The agent told me in no uncertain terms to only use the right foot for accellerator and brake. He was right, I've had no problems with autos since

I remember driving my first time in the states.  Going down the ramp in a GTx, the harder I put my foot down, the lower speed the car used to go, it used to rev like mad but go no faster at the bottom of the ramp.  I used to drive it like a european apparently rather than expecting to join.  I hope never to drive in the states again -I hope never to go back: too many guns, I never feel sfe
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 10, 2019, 08:19:11 PM
Try Canada - much nicer!
 
  Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RST on February 10, 2019, 08:54:58 PM
I set-up my own Ltd. company last year and I am not coverred to work in the USA. great news for me.  I hate amerirca -too many guns!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: LJ Crew on February 10, 2019, 09:13:13 PM
Many years ago I worked for 3 weeks in Florida. The company provided a car (Ford Galaxy) and one weekend I drove the 200 odd miles to Cape Canaveral. After 2 hours or so at 55 mph I turned off route A1, down the clover leaf and put my foot on the clutch as I slowed down! The guy behind stopped as well!! When I returned to UK my Renault 6 stalled at every road junction. :D
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 10, 2019, 11:37:41 PM
As I understand it members of caravan and Motorhome club have free entry to RSPB
A trip to Fairburn Ings tomorrow I think  :-)


https://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves-and-events/reserves-a-z/fairburn-ings (https://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves-and-events/reserves-a-z/fairburn-ings)



Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 11, 2019, 09:25:35 AM

....Right foot does it all, inspeakable in my generation to use left foot in an auto on the usual highway.  I am really shocked to hear folk do that, in my learning it repesents an element of uncontrol in the vehicle unless youre Ken Block or anyone needing to "balance pedals" to get the back-end round.
I can think of no circumstance where deviation from the approved guidelines fall secondary to internet rubbish


Who's doing the 'approving'? Just because a car hire company executive says that it's wrong to left foot brake doesn't mean he's correct. How much experience do they have at even trying it?

As I said earlier, I was taught to left foot brake with an automatic during my test driving courses in the 1960s and updates and I always have.

I'm not sugesting that it's 'dangerous' or 'foolhardy' to right foot brake in an automatic, I'm just saying that I do it and it works for me. If all of you right foot brakers want to keep on doing it, that's fine, just don't expect me to follow your 'advice'.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 11, 2019, 09:42:25 AM
Yes, but if you happen to be caught short and cross your legs... :o

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on February 11, 2019, 09:45:28 AM

The hire man knew his stuff - he was offering sound advice to his market, probably in the hope of getting his car back in one piece.If you did your learning on an automatic, left foot braking will be natural.  BUT if you are a long time manual driver, when you get into an automatic, tuck your left leg out of the way.  The first time you set off, everything will work fine.  A few times down the line, your body will forget and you will find that when you press the clutch, (which is really a great big brake pedal), you really kick it, and everybody on board is now sitting at the front.
Almost as bad is a habitual auto driver going into a manual.  It happened to a work mate.  He drove a Triumph 200 Mk2 Auto, needed to borrow my works van (HA Viva) for a trip up the road.  All was OK until he stopped in the yard at the other end and wondered, briefly, why it was just bouncing up and down and spluttering.  Then he remembered the stick thingy and that other pedal.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 11, 2019, 10:59:20 AM
Dear oh dear, all this telling other people what they should to...........

As I said before, one of my cars is manual and one is an auto. As it happens they're the same manufacturer and model too, Vauxhall Signums, so the gearbox is the major difference between them. I have no problems switching from one to the other, switching brake and clutch functions for my left foot appropriately.

But I'm not suggesting or even advising that others slavishly follow the system I use, do what works best for you, but please don't condemn other people's systems simply because they are different!

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: swiftdoc on February 11, 2019, 09:33:16 PM
As far as I know drivers in Formula 1 use left foot braking nowadays. So if you are used to it, it should be no problem. A friend of mine drives a car with paddles at the steering wheel and changed to left foot braking without facing any problems.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Aradi on February 12, 2019, 08:30:58 AM
My friends had the same issue to stay or to go. He decided to go and retire 100%. He told me that we have only 1 life so no need in spending it on working all the time. He decided to buy this (https://tranio.com/greece/) property in Greece and moved there with his wife. Kids are grown up, no need in taking care of them. So now he just enjoys life, sail a small boat and likes to have long walks.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 12, 2019, 09:19:24 AM
RST what has the horse power and  powerful car got to do with braking left foot or otherwise or give you the right to condemn it . In my case I tried it and find it  very useful  I did not recommend it just gave my reasons as why, e.g. milliseconds saved in hitting the brake or accelator should that be required As for your selecting Park at traffic lights well brilliant  so your reversing lights flash on as you  prepare to move, the following drivers must love that.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on February 12, 2019, 12:02:11 PM
Any chance the moderators could put an end to the discussion over left braking as it's getting heated.  <*<
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on February 12, 2019, 01:47:11 PM
If you have a DSG auto, leaving in it drive and sitting on the brake at traffic lights has led to lots of DSG failures especially with VAG DQ200 gearboxes. I loved the auto in my Z4. At traffic lights or queues, you just pressed the button on the side of the selector and it put the car in park eliminating the need to sit on the brake and annoy the driver behind.
If people dont want to use or cannot get used to 'left foot' braking in an auto, all I can say is, Id been driving manuals since I passed my test back in 1974. Within a very short time of driving my autos, I was using left foot braking no problems.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 12, 2019, 01:52:11 PM
Chillax everyone please  :-)
Each to their own


Signed a retiree  :-))  not wishing to sound moderatorish but I feel responsible for this thread.
Meanwhile I'm not required at work next week either  :}  that'll be three straight weeks
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on February 13, 2019, 09:06:36 AM
I only do 20 hours a week which equates to 1044 hours per year - but being on a need to be in shift pattern that doesn't exactly stick to 20 hours a week, this 1044 gets used up quite quickly -  :D  so I have been off since Jan 7th until March 31st - only down side is we have mandatory training day each year and a requirement that if off for more than 28 days we have to work a day to maintain our certification. that means I have two days to work before the end of March - though all overtime.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Brian60 on February 13, 2019, 02:54:23 PM
All this left foot right foot :embarrassed: I swap between both as and when needed, even using left foot braking in the manual Picasso at times - sometimes its just more stable in corners to keep the throttle slightly open while braking with the left foot, it cures it of understeer.

But more to the point if I'm out in the MG and wanting som 'spirited' driving I revert to heel and toeing the clutch brake and accelerator, anybody remember heel and toeing from the early days? Its not strictly necessary with a modern synchro gearbox but it does seem to help the MG!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 13, 2019, 04:47:15 PM
 :-))  Welcome to the club Brian but alas you are talking about ''Driving'' not  mentioned very much in the discussion. Heel and toeing and crash boxes, Double declutching Ah! those were the days.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 13, 2019, 05:49:47 PM
Exactly........

When they taught me to drive while I was an apprentice the instructor said 'First we're going to teach you to drive. Then we'll teach you to pass the driving test. Don't make the mistake of thinking there's any connection between those activities..........'  :-)

Later, on the advanced test driving course, we were doing handbrake turns (in Mini Coopers) on the third or fourth week of the course, and I was 19 at the time.  %)

They also covered left foot braking in autos and heeling and toeing as well.

If your MG is an MGB Brian I hope you like the seat belt anchorages as I was the development engineer for them.  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 13, 2019, 07:22:47 PM
I've been following a thread on state pension entitlement and there seems to be a lot of misconceptions and misinformation. Some people think that if you contracted out you lose out.
I contracted out late 80"s and never contracted back in.
I am entitled to full state pension when I reach retirement age in 5 yrs time.
Contracting out does not affect basic state pension as you still paid N.I. contributions but at a reduced rate. 35 years of full contributions are needed to get the forecast £164.??
You can view your pension forecast on GOV. website and see your contribution record and forecasted entitlement
My private pension is worth more than the earnings related I would have got had I not contracted out.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 13, 2019, 09:15:21 PM
Link for those heading towards retirement
https://www.gov.uk/check-state-pension (https://www.gov.uk/check-state-pension)


Personally it shows me I have 43yrs of full contributions + 2 yrs of insufficient contributions
So I have already paid 8yrs more than the minimum with 5yrs to go to state retirement age
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 13, 2019, 10:51:00 PM
Oh yes it does   every year on my  state pension it shows   what I lose out on and it is a bloody lot.When I got my forecast prior to deciding to take early retirement there was no mention of it . 7 years later when I was 65 it was  a good bit less than forecast . When I queried it  I was told  it was due to opting out.When I asked if there was a formula  so I could work out what opting out saved me in contributions so I could weigh up the difference I was told NOPE. If I can find the figures i will post them
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 13, 2019, 10:55:15 PM
Oh yes it does   every year on my  state pension it shows   what I lose out on and it is a bloody lot.When I got my forecast prior to deciding to take early retirement there was no mention of it . 7 years later when I was 65 it was  a good bit less than forecast . When I queried it  I was told  it was due to opting out.When I asked if there was a formula  so I could work out what opting out saved me in contributions so I could weigh up the difference I was told NOPE. If I can find the figures i will post them
All you lose out on is earnings related pension you should still get the full basic pension.


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-TqrTJp3/0/5cf4782c/X2/C8A55888-9779-4478-85ED-5EAA7E6E907E-X2.jpg)


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-pXcGTh8/0/a6bbc41b/X2/447BA8C7-89DC-44D2-885D-DB0B75DF5929-X2.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 13, 2019, 11:07:32 PM
Aye well it certainly affected mine as said  Ill see what  this years statement comes up with
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: canabus on February 14, 2019, 03:31:31 AM
Hi Brian

Add about three pounds more in the front tyres for the under steering problem.
Your tyres should only two pound between hot and cold tyre temperature.
I did a defense driving course whilst at work.
Work cars are good to experiment on and we had some very poor roads to drive on each day.
I increase my tyre life by 7000km.

Better in the wet and sharper turn in on the corners.
A bit harder ride.

Left foot braking was another lesson I pickup on the free course.
Two second to change from go to stop pedal.
That's two seconds more braking and that can save you and the car.
Also all that dam paper work~!!~

Canabus

Canabus
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Brian60 on February 14, 2019, 06:29:02 PM


If your MG is an MGB Brian I hope you like the seat belt anchorages as I was the development engineer for them.  :-)
No its a 2002 TF not even a original TF from the 1950's
As an aside it was intersting to see the note about state pensions.
I retired early at 57, I'm now 63. I did the UGOV to see about my pension and got similar results 5 years ago. But a few months after retiring I got an official letter saying that not keeping up my pension payments would likely affect what was paid when it was paid! This was even with 37 years already paid into the scheme! I was opted out of course, not by choice but by employer many many years ago.
What I fail to understand though is why if you reach the maximum years of 35 they expect you to carry on paying or they will reduce what is paid!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 14, 2019, 07:07:22 PM
not sure which pension you are  referring to Brian are you saying you still have to  do national insurance to protect your state pension Or to enhance it?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 14, 2019, 07:20:15 PM
Early retirement and State Pension
The earliest that you can get your State Pension is when you reach your State Pension age. Youíll have to wait to claim your state pension if you retire before you reach that age.You may receive less when you reach State Pension age than if you'd continued working. This is because you get a State Pension by building up enough 'qualifying years'. A qualifying year is a tax year in which you have enough earnings on which you have paid National Insurance contributions (NICs). It also includes a year in which you are treated as having paid or have been credited with paying NICs. Find out more at the following nidirect pages
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Brian60 on February 14, 2019, 07:25:06 PM
not sure which pension you are  referring to Brian are you saying you still have to  do national insurance to protect your state pension Or to enhance it?
The letter as I remember was saying I had to keep up my NI contributions to preserve my state pension - even though I had paid in 2 years more than the requisite amount to gain the full endowment. So by their reckoning I would have paid by age 55 the full amount required for a pension, but they expect me to carry on paying until age 66, so a full 11 years more paid in than would be required. I'm just glad I have my superannuated works pension, at least I know whats what with that one. Whatever comes my way in 3 years time by way of state pension will  be a bonus!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 14, 2019, 07:26:48 PM
If you register at the link I gave earlier it will tell you exactly what you will get and what you have paid
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 14, 2019, 08:04:29 PM
Brian there are different schemes these days like not drawing your pension at 65 and then you get more when you do .No use to me I retired in'98 just wondered if perhaps this might  also be something if you retire early whereby you can stil increase your state pension.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RMH on February 14, 2019, 10:32:52 PM
Following this thread with some interest (well some of it anyway). I turn 60 next month so have been looking a bit closer at my pensions and what I am likely to retire on. I want to retire no later than 64 so have been saving a bit of cash to live on for a year or so although I do have a forces pension which is quite handy. Having checked the website Taranis has pointed to (have been looking there for a couple of years) I will get the full state pension if I pay NI contributions for another three years having already paid for 42 years but I was opted out for a good few years. It is only a forecast so not taking anything for granted until i start to claim it.
This thread has become very dis-jointed so Mods could you please make a new thread for the driving stuff, it's all a bit confusing as it is.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 14, 2019, 10:45:14 PM
It must be related to how much NI actually paid then
Most of my years were full of overtime so I paid rather a lot
I am not being told to pay any more and already achieved full pension and there is nothing I can do to improve it. As per screen grabs earlier
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: terry horton on February 15, 2019, 08:53:24 AM
At 63 circumstances lead me to take early retirement
Best thing I ever did was to get assistance from a good Financial Adviser. Sadly there are some shysters about and it is so easy to get the wrong advice which can be expensive...... I was very lucky in that my Company supplied and paid  for one who I knew to be honest and very good and I still see him at least once a year.
I thad o wait almost two years to get my Government Pension but with the sound advice I got from my a FI , both my wife and I are now able to utilise both our GP's as " back pocket" money


Regards
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 15, 2019, 09:24:09 AM
Another sting in the tail is Tax When calculating on your state pension  i.e. if you already pay tax on your company pension you lose  20% of your state pension and/or any other income  in Tax
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on February 15, 2019, 11:48:42 AM
If your very lucky you could be loosing 40% tax off some  >>:-(
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on February 15, 2019, 12:32:56 PM
in 2011 at age 51 I was made redundant, they paid out 30,000 tax free, and the rest went into your pension pot, I was lucky I was just 6 months under the maximum length of service for the maximum payout.
 from the pension pot, I was lucky as the pension scheme I was on would only pay out early if you were made redundant once you were over 50, so I opted for the 30,000 tax free lump sum and the rest as a pension, the two lump sums paid off my mortgage - just so I was left with a 9,000 a year pension, this wasnt enough for a family of 3 to survive on so I had to find a new job, the 9, 000 gets the bulk of my non tax attracting income, so I pay nearly the full 20% on the rest of my earnings, at my new company I joined the pension fund, so will be getting a small pension from them when I retire, plus my state pension. I could have waited to receive my pension at retirement age, then it  would have been higher, but opted for a smaller amount over a longer term (i think the break even point was living to 96, after which I got less in total for the smaller amount
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: DaveM on February 15, 2019, 12:51:13 PM
Another sting in the tail is Tax When calculating on your state pension  i.e. if you already pay tax on your company pension you lose  20% of your state pension and/or any other income  in Tax
Not necessarily. Everyone has a basic personal allowance of £11,500 (£12,500 from this April). You are liable to income tax only on that amount by which your total income exceeds this e.g. if your company pension is £10,000 and your state pension is £6500 then you first add them together then deduct £11,500 to give you the taxable amount of income - in that example that's £5,000, so you'd pay £1,000 in tax. The threshold for the 40% tax band will be £50,000 in 2019/20, but you'd pay the 40% tax only on that amount by which your total income after the personal allowance exceeds £50K.
I love retirement so much that I've retired twice!
DM
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 12:56:57 PM
Iím drawing my personal allowance from my pension pot until itís all gone and I reach 66
House is paid for and wife has a nice pension from local authority after redundancy.
We both manage on hers just about so will be relatively well off when we get our state pensions and mine will be free of tax
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on February 15, 2019, 01:53:00 PM
As I see it the Grabbers cannot take tax from the State Pension, so any tax payable comes from other income aka works pensions.
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: DaveM on February 15, 2019, 02:49:46 PM
As I see it the Grabbers cannot take tax from the State Pension, so any tax payable comes from other income aka works pensions.
Ned
Quite correct, as long as the personal tax allowance remains greater than the state pension. At present the latter is little more than half the former and much less than the so-called "living wage". Strange, that... 

The only tangible benefit you get from the tax system when you retire is that you no longer have to pay National Insurance which, as Ken Clarke once said, "isn't a tax - it's a contribution".  I'm sure we're all happier for knowing that, Ken  %)
DM
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 03:10:26 PM
Itís actually only your pensions that are immune to N.I. If you still work anything over £160 per week attracts national insurance at 12%
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: dougal99 on February 15, 2019, 03:17:13 PM
The letter as I remember was saying I had to keep up my NI contributions to preserve my state pension - even though I had paid in 2 years more than the requisite amount to gain the full endowment. So by their reckoning I would have paid by age 55 the full amount required for a pension, but they expect me to carry on paying until age 66, so a full 11 years more paid in than would be required. I'm just glad I have my superannuated works pension, at least I know whats what with that one. Whatever comes my way in 3 years time by way of state pension will  be a bonus!



I retired at 57 on a company pension and paid no more NI. I had the requisite years for a full state pension and that kicked in when I was 65. However, you have to allow for the guaranteed minimum pension GMP. This is normally paid in the state pension, but is paid by any other pension before state pension age. When the state pension kicks in it takes on the GMP. Voila it's deducted from your company pension. So you can't add the two together when calculating your future income.


Letters for HMRC can be unintentionally worrying. My wife received a letter from them a few years before she retired listing the years she had underpaid NI. Some years were a few pound but several were over 4 figures. The letter advised she could buy them back. Well we were in no position to pay it all. My wife rang the help line and thankfully got a really helpful chap. No you don't have to pay it all, only 3 years to make up to the required number. So were we going to pay off the 4 figure years or the few pound years? Difficult! Anyway as your still working and if you continue to work you don't need to do anything.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: nemesis on February 15, 2019, 04:01:23 PM
Well, you speak as you find. I have driven manual and auto cars for years. You learn to really drive an auto with two feet. You have two feet and two pedals, two hands and two stalks, it does seem logical. What all people take into consideration is the mixing up of the systems. Forget the manual system. Why is the brake pedal on an auto twice the size of a manual? If autos came first then manuals would not get a look in, like fuel injection versus carbs, and I liked to look at the complexity of the Stromberg, Weber etc.. but where are they now. I had a great conversation with an AA examiner over this point and I can see his point and he could see mine. My thoughts only after 60 odd years driving both systems, nemesis
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 04:06:45 PM
Yes I've completely retired from manual now  :-))
My car and motorhome are both robotised gear change. Ducato 3litre Comfortmatic (IVECO) is awesome but alas now obsolete as it cannot meet euro 6. So converters are now using smaller engines with bigger balls. Doubt they'll stand the mileage of the bigger lump.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Brian60 on February 15, 2019, 06:56:54 PM
There is also the tax liability transfer that can be made use of! For a married couple both on retirement on company pensions, if one or the other is actually paid more than the other. Tax liability can be shared across both pensions. In our case, my pension didn't exceed the tax threshold, but my wifes did. SO part of her tax liability was transferred to me, meaning she pays less tax and I still pay no tax at all. This was all done for us with an application on the .GOV website. Both names and NI numbers and a tick box to say you wished to do it ( as I remember?) Then the taxman does all the legwork for you.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 06:58:12 PM
There is also the tax liability transfer that can be made use of! For a married couple both on retirement on company pensions, if one or the other is actually paid more than the other. Tax liability can be shared across both pensions. In our case, my pension didn't exceed the tax threshold, but my wifes did. SO part of her tax liability was transferred to me, meaning she pays less tax and I still pay no tax at all. This was all done for us with an application on the .GOV website. Both names and NI numbers and a tick box to say you wished to do it ( as I remember?) Then the taxman does all the legwork for you.
That will be useful for me thank you, a quick calculation shows that saves my wife £800  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 15, 2019, 07:11:43 PM
Not necessarily. Everyone has a basic personal allowance of £11,500 (£12,500 from this April). You are liable to income tax only on that amount by which your total income exceeds this e.g. if your company pension is £10,000 and your state pension is £6500 then you first add them together then deduct £11,500 to give you the taxable amount of income - in that example that's £5,000, so you'd pay £1,000 in tax. The threshold for the 40% tax band will be £50,000 in 2019/20, but you'd pay the 40% tax only on that amount by which your total income after the personal allowance exceeds £50K.
I love retirement so much that I've retired twice!
DM


I would have thought  (if you already pay tax on your company pension) covered that  simpler than a maths lesson.Made the mistake that most would have realised that
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: DaveM on February 15, 2019, 07:35:34 PM
I think the best anyone can take away from this thread is not to rely on a model boats Internet forum to provide any definitive answers relating to income tax and pension matters. I spent 31 years working for HMRC and some of the stuff I've read on this thread is at best anecdotal and at at its worst 'unhelpful'. Forgive me for the maths lesson but many folk find an example set of figures much easier to relate to than a general statement. Explaining finance without using figures is like trying to discuss art without pictures or sounds.

O - and I drive an automatic and brake with my right foot, having got used to that mode after 45 years of driving manual-transmission cars. I couldn't care less which foot anyone else uses, as long as they use it before they hit me.

Dave M
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on February 15, 2019, 10:00:43 PM
PLEASE can we get back to model boats.   >>:-(
UK tax has nothing to do with Mayhem.
Yesterday I put up some shelves for our 4 month old great grandsons books and included a little row boat on the top shelf for when he is big enough to reach it. 

If his Dad does not get to it first  %%
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 10:05:45 PM
Hi Brian
The chit chat forum is for discussion about anything. There are plenty of other forum sections to play with
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: RMH on February 15, 2019, 10:18:43 PM
True but this thread has now become rather muddled can we not stick to just one topic
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 15, 2019, 10:22:22 PM
Itís a catalyst for conversation.
Personally I donít mind where it goes as long as members donít fall out. Anyone who doesnít like the conversation doesnít have to read it.
I donít think that is unreasonable but if moderation disagree I bow to their judgment.
Clearly itís of interest or members wouldnít bother to reply.

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on February 16, 2019, 07:02:49 AM
True but this thread has now become rather muddled can we not stick to just one topic


  It's not muddled !  It's about members viewing retirement who don't know which foot to use on the brake pedal.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on February 16, 2019, 09:46:53 AM

  It's not muddled !  It's about members viewing retirement who don't know which foot to use on the brake pedal.
Spot on!  Reading any particular thread really is optional.
Anybody remember when you needed extra feet for the dip switch and the screen washer?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 16, 2019, 10:01:13 AM
Quote
Anybody remember when you needed extra feet for the dip switch and the screen washer?

Unfortanately, yes. And when the gearchange was on the steering column.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 16, 2019, 11:33:21 AM

Unfortanately, yes. And when the gearchange was on the steering column.


Groan! Don't remind me, pleeeease!  :((

Tales of a Mk IIIC Hillman Minx that just WOULDN'T change into second to climb up the slope to our test workshop............
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 16, 2019, 11:38:31 AM
 As a young teenager my uncle had a Hillman Husky and the throttle cable snapped while we were on the road. He got me laid in the back with the floor panel removed to operate the throttle.  I got us home but talk about kangaroo juice  {-)


(http://www.imps4ever.info/family/husky.gif)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on February 16, 2019, 11:44:55 AM
Ah here is where we can link back to boats, a friend of mine has procedures in place for emergency throttle and steering in case the cables break, it does require at least one other person to either operate the throttle or manually turn the rudder from the top of the rudder post (he has had both fail at one time or other - never both together though.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Martin [Admin] on February 16, 2019, 12:01:35 PM

Shall we let this run until Sunday and do you want to continue the discussion?    :police:
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on February 16, 2019, 12:14:50 PM
Goodness yes Malcolm ..... any older Australian who has driven from Sydney to Melbourne, or Sydney to Brisbane in the dark hours [1000 km for you stay at home poms ok2  ] ....


I say this as they were both approximately a 12 to 14 hour trip.........[only stopping twice in the dark hours for fuel]


Yes ...the positioning of your feet was ....right foot on the accelerator & left foot on the Hi-Beam floor dip switch  :kiss:


In those days we only had two speeds....go...& dip the lights when necessary....mind you if you were discourteous & forgot to dip the lights at a truckie......you were blinded by Manfred Manns revenge  {-)


Derek
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 16, 2019, 12:44:23 PM

Shall we let this run until Sunday and do you want to continue the discussion?    :police:


Does it need an agenda? Surely it will fade away if people lose interest all on its own
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on February 16, 2019, 01:06:02 PM
I couldn't care less which foot anyone else uses, as long as they use it before they hit me.


 :-)) :-))
Well said Sir O0
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 16, 2019, 01:07:38 PM
I couldn't care less which foot anyone else uses, as long as they use it before they hit me.


 :-)) :-))
Well said Sir O0
Ned


Yes quite succinct  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KitS on February 16, 2019, 02:12:09 PM

 As a young teenager my uncle had a Hillman Husky and the throttle cable snapped while we were on the road. He got me laid in the back with the floor panel removed to operate the throttle.  I got us home but talk about kangaroo juice  {-)


(http://www.imps4ever.info/family/husky.gif)


Cracking motor car, as all Imp derived cars were, not that I'm biased of course.  :-)

I had six Imps of various types in my life, at least two of which I built myself (Pressed Steel made the body shells and that's where I worked.....  ok2.) My fave was a Husky, just like your uncle's in the pic, except mine had an 80 bhp engine.........  ok2
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 16, 2019, 02:16:46 PM
I don't know the story behind him obtaining that as he usually drove Minor 1000's because he worked for GPO and did under the counter deals with the stores for parts  {-)  Maybe he got fed up of having a new floor pan welded into every single one  O0 . I learned to drive in his Triumph Toledo which was lovely having a hydraulic clutch  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 24, 2019, 09:09:43 PM
Over the last three weeks I think me and the wife have concluded I donít need to work even for pocket change so a resolution is imminent
Tomorrow we head for Clumber Park for three days chillaxin in the hope this unseasonal good weather holds
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on February 25, 2019, 10:34:11 PM
As the weather was nice today, I decided it was time to fit the new chain and derailier to the mountain bike. Put the work stand up and was surprisingly easy to index the gears and get a smooth change through all 21 gears. Looking good for tomorrow to go on a 20k bike ride.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on February 26, 2019, 09:00:47 AM
As the weather was nice today, I decided it was time to fit the new chain and derailier to the mountain bike. Put the work stand up and was surprisingly easy to index the gears and get a smooth change through all 21 gears. Looking good for tomorrow to go on a 20k bike ride.
Its a long bike ride to find mountains from Thornton Cleveleys, probably more than 20K there and back.  I believe that Bonds at Elswick have shut their ice cream counter, so a different objective might be needed.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 26, 2019, 09:05:15 AM
Itís cracking the flags here at Clumber Park and Iíve never seen a caravan site so busy during the week especially in February.
Brakes are off now and full speed into the advantages of not relying on the weekends.
I might get my Brompton out for a pootle  O0
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: nemesis on February 26, 2019, 04:10:13 PM
Oh Malcolm, they put their bikes on the rack, drive 50 miles to ride 20 and drive back again in time for tea. doh nemesis
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: justboatonic on February 26, 2019, 06:50:18 PM
Its a long bike ride to find mountains from Thornton Cleveleys, probably more than 20K there and back.  I believe that Bonds at Elswick have shut their ice cream counter, so a different objective might be needed.
Hehe. Bourne Hill is about as high as it gets. I went to Fleetwood and cycled along the sea front, past Rossall, Cleveleys to Bispham Tram Station and back. Not far off 20k I think plus I dont have to go on much road so its a safer ride all told.
They've invested some money on the sea wall along most of the stretch so it's a nice ride or walk if you're inclined.
 I did forget to take a couple of quid with me and the sea front shops were doing a brisk trade in ices and the like  :((
I used to have an old Elswick Hopper but that came from Newcastle I believe.
Oh and tomorrow, its a nice walk around Fleetwood Asda with wifey  <:(
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on February 27, 2019, 10:32:10 AM
Oh Malcolm, they put their bikes on the rack, drive 50 miles to ride 20 and drive back again in time for tea. doh nemesis
As a growing lad I was quite keen, 100+ miles being "a good day out", but after learning to drive, things got different. 
One day, a few years on, needing to bike it to work about 7 miles from home, I peddled myself along (Fylde coast, pan flat) and spent about 20 minutes getting the breathing back to normal on arrival.  Nowadays, taking a yacht for a walk up and down Fairhaven (Ĺ mile there another Ĺ back) satisfies my need to burn off a few calories to keep my waistband under control.
A country lane ride back then was grand - I would be terrified today with the change in traffic.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 27, 2019, 09:33:28 PM
I used to do very many miles on all manner of roads in all manner of traffic conditions without fear. If the fitness is there it boosts the assuredness and handling 3 lane roundabout's a synch  {-)  BUT a small change in lifestyle/circumstances can take all that away. I now rarely ride and have not competed for about 6 yrs now but in my last year at about 55 I did every distance time trial from 10 mile to the 12hr event. It's now a closed chapter of my life that I reflect on fondly.
Model boat building can be far more stressful  O0

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Cycling/Yorkshire-Velo-members/i-7dGhxz8/0/da0680ab/X3/YCF%2025%202nd%20May%2009-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Jerry C on February 27, 2019, 10:07:28 PM
Iím 69 and a keen cyclist. I took it up 9 years ago. Iíve done a few sportifs, …tape Eryri, tour de MŰn, …tape Australia twice and got an early bird entry for next year. Doing the Big Canberra Bike Ride with my daughter this Sunday. I use my uk bike to do any long distance shopping when cruising my Narrowboat back in uk.
Love it and fitter than Iíve ever been.
Jerry.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 27, 2019, 10:12:51 PM
I'm impressed.  :-))
Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on February 27, 2019, 10:14:01 PM
A very popular event is the La Ronde Picardie, Northern France and a choice of 3 distances. I did the 185k four years running.
It starts in Abbeville and is fully marshalled so traffic is stopped for you.
The Grande Trophy Competition has many events across France to go at.


The climb from Ault
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Nostalgia/My-past/i-gJvsLzS/0/9ef709c4/O/picarde%20colour.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on February 27, 2019, 11:14:29 PM
All this talk of long distance bicycle  riding  %)


About 30 years before retirement, I borrowed my daughters boyfriends new fangled Mountain Bike [remembering OZ is a Land of mountain ranges & sweeping plains]

My track was from Wollongong to the North.....[along a tared bicycle track......with near ZERO variation in elevation]

Yes...Wollongong to North Wollongong to Fairy Meadow to Towradgi to Corrimal to Woonona & then to Bulli....probably about 11 kilometers as the crow flies

Proudly dismounted & had a swig of Cotties Lemon Crush......then rode back to Wollongong

Next day I decided to venture further north of Bulli........ O0  ....got 2 kilometers to Fairy Meadow & legs locked up with cramps <*<


Have not ventured on a pushie since............. Derek


Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on February 28, 2019, 11:52:58 AM
Quote
Have not ventured on a pushie since

You should have tried a unicycle Derek, only one wheel so half the effort and 360 degree steering....

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on February 28, 2019, 12:18:43 PM
Naw its the obligatory wearing of his hereditary ball and chain that is the problem %)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on February 28, 2019, 08:40:30 PM
5 weeks/15 working days and counting!

Looking forward to it.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: rem2007 on March 01, 2019, 09:22:11 AM
I suppose I qualify as semi-retired, after 2 redundancies is the past 5 years in the social housing sector, then the last outfit I was 2pd over to said I would be made redundant again I said tell you what I'll save you the paper work and quit....took some time off last year after that to sort out my blood pressure which wasn't great and went to visit the new grand daughter on Vancouver Island in July. Now I work part time at a local car auction and we take in french students, who are out all day on outings. As were now empty nesters, except 2 dogs, life is fairly quiet but I have to keep a positive account balance to satisfy the Home Office as still on a Visa here, oh well, more time for dog walks and fiddling about in the shed now its warming up a bit. Wife is expecting spinal surgery soon on L4 5 and 6, but daughter number 2 will come home to help me sort her out...
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: The Old Gals on March 01, 2019, 11:03:40 AM
I used to do very many miles on all manner of roads in all manner of traffic conditions without fear. If the fitness is there it boosts the assuredness and handling 3 lane roundabout's a synch  {-)  BUT a small change in lifestyle/circumstances can take all that away. I now rarely ride and have not competed for about 6 yrs now but in my last year at about 55 I did every distance time trial from 10 mile to the 12hr event. It's now a closed chapter of my life that I reflect on fondly.
Model boat building can be far more stressful  O0

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Cycling/Yorkshire-Velo-members/i-7dGhxz8/0/da0680ab/X3/YCF%2025%202nd%20May%2009-X3.jpg)
[s/quote]. Is that a MAMIL I see?  (Tess  O0 )
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on March 01, 2019, 11:12:30 AM
Had a friend over last weekend - ended up talking about retirement - his cunning plan is to cash up everything, cash up his pensions, sell the house and buy an Aston Martin and he also wants to go around the world.


He says he's fed up of living the small life and is going to enjoy himself - and if it all goes wrong, he'll dump himself on the state to sort it out.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 01, 2019, 11:27:15 AM
Passed middle age Tess  {:-{
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 04, 2019, 04:13:48 PM
Going back to Pensions and contracting out just had My latest figures and contracting out  deduction is £129 less in  my state pension there is no way to check if I saved that amount by paying less on contracting out
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on March 04, 2019, 04:19:08 PM
Mines the same.
Even if I knew the answer,
it's too late to do anything
about it >>:-(
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 04, 2019, 06:49:46 PM
Yup! Ned but I think  it is wrong they will not give you the details so you can work out   how  much of a mistake we might have made
Expect they are concerned some wizard might prove their figures are wrong {:-{




Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on March 04, 2019, 06:57:33 PM
1. Best not to know - it will only make you miserable.

2. Yes, the figures are probably wrong but could be in your favour - do you feel lucky?

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 04, 2019, 07:17:19 PM
Matters not Colin we are supposed to be in an era of freedom of information
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on March 04, 2019, 07:54:01 PM
Too much information can be dangerous.  :o

Trying to follow Government pension calculations will do your head in and may seriously reduce the time for which your pension is payable. Not a desirable outcome.

Rough comparisons are best. Is your pension more or less the same as your friends in a similar situation? In my case my Wife gets a bit more on the state pension and didn't contract out but I have a good occupational pension. We both qualifed for the full state pension but of course entitlement changed over the years every time they altered the rules.
The whole thing is a bureaucratic black hole really. If you think you are getting a reasonable amount then best to stick with it.
If you made the wrong decision years back there is nothing you can do to remedy the situation. You did what you thought was best at the time. Be philosophical.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on March 04, 2019, 09:18:22 PM
The one good thing is that we have and are living in a period of relatively low inflation which gives you a chance to swim against the tide of depreciation.   I remember back in 1975 inflation rate was 24% pa. and a lot of years were not far behind .    That meant the value of your fixed pension was more than halving every 3 years . Hopefully we never go there again.  What you need when you retire and take some lump sums is a damn good financial advisor who can sort you out with investments that will show you a return.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 04, 2019, 10:51:41 PM
Baldrick I have been retired over 20 +years + Colin the only reason I brought the topic up again as in the original posts there were  some who were only about to start getting ther  state pension . My mention of the  opting out was purely as an awareness warning should they not be allowing for that. As it was some  seemed  the reduction was not all that much Well I think different and said when I got my  next statement I would  confirm. I am looking forward to my weekly increase in August of 25p for being 80
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 05, 2019, 01:09:30 AM
Pretty sure I've signed off completely from work now.
The pin money was nice but life is too short.
The bonus is I don't have to consider getting up in the morning anymore and if I'm inspired I can play all night
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Portgrath/-1/i-DFjLknB/0/4f9ea1b8/X3/9E2B4AEC-0CC5-4517-9CFF-0BAAE9948B0A-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on March 05, 2019, 09:06:27 AM
Hi Jaymac being slightly ahead (mine was last July) of you I saved up my increase for a take away fish and chips for one, the missus will have to wait another 6 months to fund hers.  Seriously though, 25p a week increase, hardly worth the admin to give it.

regards

Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 05, 2019, 12:41:51 PM
Hi Roy If my missus was still with us she'd say oh that means you could keep another woman :-))
Cheers
Jay
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on March 05, 2019, 12:53:14 PM
Wow that is really cheap!  All the ones I know are expensive.

Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 06:34:23 PM
Well Iíve only gone and done it  :-))
Iíve just emailed my resignation to may agent  O0

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: SteamboatPhil on March 10, 2019, 06:54:16 PM
you will not regret it  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 06:55:08 PM
you will not regret it  :-))
Feels good thanks
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 08:59:19 PM
I've been seriously reorganising my work space today. Have you ever seen anything like it  {-) %%
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-7krSjkD/0/20f58fd0/X3/3CAB0B92-1603-430D-8918-A2F0783AC5EA-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: grendel on March 10, 2019, 09:14:50 PM
the electrical engineer in me doesnt like the look of those daisy chained extension leads, I trust you have calculated the load on that single socket?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 09:17:02 PM
The first point of connection is of course fused at 13 amps so regardless of the other equipment this cannot be exceeded  :-))
However everything connected is very low current individually and not all used simultaneously
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 09:42:46 PM
This LED lighting is typical of the loads, very cheap delivered from ebay. I've had these since December and only just made time to fit.
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-gmm4Mzg/0/d2e51860/X3/3E5AD640-E01A-4EA4-9481-113DC192F643-X3.jpg)


I used cable ties with a screw hole to fix to the redundant curtain batten. White ties may have been better


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-mtdmd5J/0/b2770e79/X3/F656E696-4EC3-4AF2-BAB8-3AB43F82F3B8-X3.jpg)


Makes a phenomenolololol improvement on the worktop after dark


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-Pg6p65r/0/eb4510db/X2/06E64512-37DC-43B6-A580-A2D5B4DD3F58-X2.jpg)


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-Hsrjd4n/0/ab07a27b/X2/7469B880-C21E-4540-BA54-AFA5440B1311-X2.jpg)


Tomorrow I'm doing the wife's craft room. The joys of endless freetime  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on March 10, 2019, 10:21:05 PM
2 questions
How do you keep the area so tidy?
How do you watch TV at the same time as making models?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 10:24:22 PM
2 questions
How do you keep the area so tidy?
How do you watch TV at the same time as making models?
I don't keep it so tidy  {-)  today I've worked at it from the crack of Dawn, reason being I'm changing from one build back to another so literally clearing the deck.
The TV is mainly kept on FREESAT 200  News mainly, listening rather than watching whichever channel I have on or the radio channels.


The TV was in our bedroom but never got used so I diverted the sat cable and used an empty corner  :-) 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on March 10, 2019, 10:32:44 PM
My system is the Layer system, anything you are looking for is always under something else.  The tidyness genes got left out of my genetic make up, so I struggle along as best I can.  There is no point in anyone else tidying up as I would have to start again looking for things.
I have a theory that putting things in 1 litre boxes and labelled is a great way to keep things.  None of these boxes fit in a nice way into any drawers I have, but the original contents (Ice cream) does tick a box in another list.
Regards.
Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 10, 2019, 10:38:17 PM
 {-) :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on March 11, 2019, 02:45:13 AM
Retirement can be a catch up on the things that you were too busy or tired to do when working a 60 hour week
_______________________
From: Derek L Warner <dlwarner@bigpond.net.au>
 Subject: Blood Factory Monday 11.03.2019
 
this morning, called @ the Blood FactoryÖÖ[super swanky new 4 story building in Kembla Street with free underground parking]
 
just by chance, Lara saw me & we sploke ..she introduced me to the other staff like I was a long lost uncle or something
so the satff member [Suzie] reinrolled me as a current donorÖ.complete with my Prescription drug total listing
re-established my record of 78 previous donations into the system
the understandable Q@A - [Stat-Dec] on health & life style & practices etc takes 20 minutesÖÖ.
I contributed 750 ml of whole blood which will be tested then given to some poor unsuspecting receipient
the painful finger pricking to check for Fe [iron levels] is now absolutely painless
no local anesethicÖÖ..the big needle  <*<  in the arm to drain the blood didn't even feelÖÖ


so afterwards, the chicken, lettuce  & Mayo Execuitive style sandwich [cut in triangles] on Multi grain was nice
vanilla milk shake with malt & ice cream was a bit thick for me
packet of salty Smith chips & 600 ml of spring water
 
Such fun & so nice the people, an appointment has been made for me in 4 weeks at the same Factory & snack barÖÖÖÖ
xo
 
 
_________________________________________________________________
 
From: Derek L Warner <dlwarner@bigpond.net.au>
 Sent: Friday, 8 March 2019 4:31 PM
 Subject: Cloths bags from Lara
 
BecÖ.Lara has dropped off 1 x large bag for you
MeganÖ.3 smaller bags for youÖ..I could bring them up next weekend Sunday the 17th??
 
Lara was wearing a Blood Bank Nurses uniformÖÖ..so we spoke about the old days when I started @ the Blood Bank 1975?......
Mentioned I got to 87 donations?...3 badges etc [25Öthen 50Öthen 75 ..missed out on my 100th]
Lara has been with  the Blood Bank for 15 years & said with the technology today, I could return [even with medication] and make donations of plattlets  only
It appears they take blood, process the fluid & return the blood back to the donorÖ.minus the plattelets??
Something for me to consider
 xo
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on March 11, 2019, 04:07:45 AM
I used to give blood, back in the dark ages.  The nurses were very nice, god knows how many times they got propositioned.  It was only when I was in one place like on a company technical course that I was able to continue, Otherwise it was not possible dashing about as I was.
 
I have an unusual blood group (A Rh-) and I saw an advert on UK TV saying a young girl could not have an op because they did not have enough of my group.  So I rang the local blood transfusion service and offered.  The response was No we have enough thanks and what advert was that I was watching?  Not been involved since.
My brother however has only recently stopped and I know he was over 100 donations.  They had a celebration when he came in for that one.  Mind you he is as pale as sheet now so maybe there is a lesson to be learned?
Carry on the good work, I am too past it for them now.
regards
Roy


Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on March 11, 2019, 07:12:13 AM
Hullo RoyÖÖ..I understand your comments re those  :kiss: Staff at the Red Cross, [so even too oldÖcan always imagined :-X ]

According toÖÖ..we have some very interesting reading

"Landsteiner K, Wiener AS (1941)".

You as Rh negativeÖ.are in of the 16% that are not related to African MonkeysÖ..as some 86% of the population have the Rheus factor  of positive +,..or the same as the monkies :o
I too,  am Rheus negaitive, but in Group OÖso am the universal donorÖ.[it has been studied and put forward those  having the Rheus negaitive factor suggests we are from Alien mutation
So without taking too much space on MBM, we have ~~86% of our members that are related to monkies {-)
Accordingly that leaves both you and I in the Rheus Factor of Alien or and Royal blood :-))
Derek


PS...donating blood is a free activity to the donor........it is also a free checkup :-X
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 11, 2019, 07:20:08 AM
 :((   {-)
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTWk8Dj3ZHUxS7hzPTwPcmqASTAfX_VT-7KytpdLTeoKpE1A4JjFg)


O-  8)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: roycv on March 11, 2019, 07:39:59 AM
Do you know Derek that makes me feel a whole lot better.  I have wondered about those awkward b******s all around me.  I thought is was just me, now I know it is them! 

84% though....mmmm  I thought it was more!
I shall cherish those statistics when any one points the finger, I shall inwardly say to myself if only they knew.
My son said he tried to give blood here but as he was in the UK when we had mad cow desease they were not interested.
By the way our exclusive 16 % who are we related to?  I would actually prefer it not to be royal blood, judging from the ones we have coming of age.  Think I will stick to being an alien.
cheers Derek,
Roy
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on March 11, 2019, 07:44:12 AM
Sorry Andy......images or pictures of  Roy's, or and my RH negative ancestors  have been classified [not for public exhibition to the 84 to 86% of the 'others']

Roy......do not worry...whenever they speak, both you and I [and our 16% flock] will understand ......we not need to say anything.......

The Royal Blood..... appears it was due to 100's of years of the interbreeding of the Royal families between the European Houses of State .......

As from an OZ Convict stock point of view, pretty sure HRH the Princess Diana broke the chain.................Derek %) 
________________________

GODS, ANGELS OR ANCIENT ASTRONAUTS?Today, modern scientists, researchers and theorists are exploring and challenging long-held beliefs and scientific hypotheses on the origin of man and our ancestry. Included in this challenge is the question of who were these 'Rh negative' outsiders of legend that visited earth so long ago, and why do we find them in so many stories and artifacts that are unique in depicting their powers and their intermingling with humans? The stories left behind, and their relevance and influence, have been uncovered through the diligent protection of sacred texts and modern archeology. Many of the sources are well known, a part of common knowledge, while others continue to be brought to our attention via modern media.[
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on March 11, 2019, 08:47:37 AM
As from an OZ Convict stock point of view, pretty sure HRH the Princess Diana broke the chain.................Derek
If she didn't Meghan certainly has
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on March 11, 2019, 09:25:27 AM
The Royal Blood..... appears it was due to 100's of years of the interbreeding of the Royal families between the European Houses of State .......


Possibly the word being looked for is inbreeding, mongrels are generally the healthy, happy ones.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on March 11, 2019, 10:28:07 AM
Thank you, yes Malcolm....being an OZ [mongrel] Convict stock, I am not familiar with the subject or word......

Of course that sport practiced  by the earlier Royal families between the European Houses of State would have been inbreeding >>:-(


Derek
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: dougal99 on March 11, 2019, 12:31:03 PM

I gave A neg for years over 70 donations then received a letter saying last donation failed 'non-specific' failure. Do not worry your doctor it was probably our testing chemicals but don't come back.  >>:-(


I do other related stuff to help medical research now.  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 11, 2019, 12:42:35 PM
Agent has acknowledged my retirement and says I have 12.5hrs holiday pay to come  {-) :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Netleyned on March 11, 2019, 01:51:14 PM
I gave A neg for years over 70 donations then received a letter saying last donation failed 'non-specific' failure. Do not worry your doctor it was probably our testing chemicals but don't come back.  >>:-(


I do other related stuff to help medical research now.  :-))



Could be harmful giving an armful :embarrassed:
Ned
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 12, 2019, 07:20:46 PM
I'm ashamed to say I've never given blood except for the 46 yrs at work. I'll look into it  :-))  and big hats off to you.
Having not worked the last 5 weeks anyway and now officially finished I've noticed a significant reduction in overheads. Changing to a Euro6 Berlingo from a 10 year old petrol Berlingo means I'm not even using a tank of diesel per month. Last two weeks has gone from full tank to 3/4 if that continues it could be near two months per refill.
I'm busier modelling than ever as the jobs people find me to do are getting less thankfully.
Looking forwards to the travelling this year without time constraints
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on March 12, 2019, 08:38:43 PM
Well Iíve only gone and done it  :-))
Iíve just emailed my resignation to may agent  O0


I thought you'd finished on 5 March?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 12, 2019, 08:43:53 PM

I thought you'd finished on 5 March?
That was the sowing of the seed that is now reality  :-))
Pretty sure I've signed off completely from work now. The pin money was nice but life is too short.The bonus is I don't have to consider getting up in the morning anymore and if I'm inspired I can play all night
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 14, 2019, 06:51:59 PM
Just trying the Asda special and can't help but burst into Freddie Mercury  {-)


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-pbZ5XdT/0/2a60444e/X3/705FD551-0B98-4F37-B169-2BCEEDF1BEF1-X3.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 22, 2019, 07:27:11 PM
Happy to report that I received my P45 by email as a password protected PDF to remain compliant with GDPR legislation WTF?  {-)  It's official and I do really feel noticeably better for doing the deed  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on March 27, 2019, 09:37:45 PM
What A great day me and wifey just had  :-))
A bit of crafting this morning then into Leeds to the Grand to see the full monty  {-)
Iíll give it a worthy 9  :-))
Then a city centre pub called the wardrobe for a draft Leffe followed by a meal at Aargrah.
No thought of work or what day of the week other than I must put the bin out tonight !
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 04, 2019, 03:55:44 PM
Perplexed but quids in
Just received a letter and a revised P60 for tax year 16/17 from my Pension fund.
Following a review of tax deducted from customers they realised they did not take any tax of my personal allowance draw down that year. So they have paid HMRC £3,500 on my behalf at no cost to me as it was their mistake. I don't know how they arrived at that figure as it ought to have been 20% if anything at all but its almost 32%
On HMRC website it acknowledges receipt of this money last December but it is too late to revise my self assessment now so I've had to write a letter for "overpayment relief"  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 04, 2019, 05:50:52 PM
FYI
"Overpayment relief" as subject title will get your claim processed with more priority than other types of correspondence.


Always make a declaration that the above is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and sign it! if you ever need to deal with them
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 05, 2019, 11:09:19 PM
Am I the only one who thinks his memory is getting worse ?
How many times have I gone upstairs and forgotten what I went for  %%
This morning with my coffee in the space of only 10 minutes I could not remember if Iíd taken my tablet or not despite having them in front of me  :embarrassed:
Anyway Iím posting to encourage the use of Apps to make life easier and remind me of things
A most useful one Iíve been using is called ďvehicle smartĒ
In this you add all your vehicles details and it reminds you of important events.
I currently have 3 in the app garage but could add my family members vehicles too
It updates via WiFi when you have passed an mot or renewed road tax all by itself too
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: BrianB6 on April 06, 2019, 05:03:09 AM
Never mind going upstairs.   Just try going through a doorway.  {:-{
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on April 06, 2019, 10:47:34 AM
I have a simple rule - 1 place for 1 thing, every day the items I carry are always left in the same place to reduce 'losing them', although there is the odd day where circumstances screw that up, in the wife's case she is always losing things and she is 9 years younger than me and should have no excuse.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 06, 2019, 12:13:08 PM
I have multiple duplicate items in different places to increase the odds of finding one  {-)  if I could remember what it was
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: SteamboatPhil on April 07, 2019, 02:21:29 PM
Steamboat apprentice and I have spare glasses on every floor (3 ) but by the end of the week they magically all appear in the kitchen, including 3 sets from the workshop....so then put them all back (until the end of the following week that is) go figure..... O0 O0 O0
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 07, 2019, 04:13:23 PM
Strangely late Sunday afternoons I still get the occasional flashback to when I'd be thinking it's work tomorrow  <:( <:(


Then I smile and have a beer  :-))
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-8TxmBsM/0/979b14ee/X4/B48D87A0-94E6-4156-8D7A-9E1718DD9E3F-X4.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: malcolmfrary on April 07, 2019, 05:07:45 PM
Steamboat apprentice and I have spare glasses on every floor (3 ) but by the end of the week they magically all appear in the kitchen, including 3 sets from the workshop....so then put them all back (until the end of the following week that is) go figure..... O0 O0 O0
Ever tried to find a working Biro?
If I manage that, I've usually forgotten what I wanted it for.  Or lost whatever it was I was going to write on.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: jaymac on April 07, 2019, 07:00:24 PM
I mentioned forgetting things to my doctor  like forgetting to pull the zip up. His reply  come and see me when you start  forgetting to pull it down
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Baldrick on April 07, 2019, 07:36:36 PM



    If you find you have got a suppository in your ear, ask yourself   " Where have I put my hearing aid"
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: warspite on April 08, 2019, 10:55:29 AM
I mentioned forgetting things to my doctor  like forgetting to pull the zip up. His reply  come and see me when you start  forgetting to pull it down


Giggled at that.


whats the supository for?
the wife would say to me, that if my hearing aid was where the supository goes, then that only confirms I talk through my arh well you know where
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on April 08, 2019, 09:57:37 PM
Retired on Friday following working part-time for 4 years. Tomorrow would be my first working day of the week and it will be great waking up and thinking that I won't have to do the 20 miles each way commute and being stuck in traffic which has got worse year on year.

I enjoyed work though but the time has come to leave it behind and have more time for my wife, interests and hobbies etc.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 08, 2019, 10:01:28 PM
My mate at work has loads of overtime now  {-)  I knew it would benefit us both  O0
Congrats Chris  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on April 09, 2019, 11:07:48 AM
Thanks Andy. Work up early but didn't get up until later. Had a look at what next to do on my Fairey Huntsman 28 build and will do a bit later. I can get used to this!

Chris
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: canabus on April 09, 2019, 11:39:22 AM
Hi Chris F

So you finally retired !!!
That makes you a SIR!!!

Senior

In

Retirement

Happy boat building.

Should have those three boats in the water for summer.

Canabus
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: ChrisF on April 09, 2019, 03:53:52 PM
Thanks Harry, yes finally done it. Don't know about the three but certainly going to try and get the Huntsman and the River Cruiser finished or at least on the water.

Chris
 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 16, 2019, 08:47:56 PM
Last year when my wife took early retirement through redundancy one of her leaving presents was an indoor climbing experience for two.
Tomorrow we are booked in at the Harrogate climbing centre  %%  before it and or we expire
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 17, 2019, 10:06:59 PM
The climbing was very good today and my wife did quite well.
Aching already but thoroughly enjoyed it and I'm going to pursue this as a fitness hobby.
Signed up with the Depot in Leeds, Gelderd road is the only one that has top & lead rope climbing as well as bouldering.
I need three £30 courses to qualify for unsupervised rope climbing after which I can go for as little as £6 per visit or less with membership plans and as over 60 concession
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 18, 2019, 08:59:52 AM
I feel like a car crash this morning  {-)


A friend on a social group replied
ďWe have an indoor climbing facility in our house that enables us to reach our bedroom on the first floor. We had it installed when the house was first built and itís certainly provided us with excellent exercise over the years. I think the manufacturers name was "Stairs".Ē
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: coch y bonddu on April 18, 2019, 10:16:05 AM
I love that one Andy a cracker.




Dave
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: DaveM on April 18, 2019, 11:05:16 AM
Working on the basis that when you get to 65, stairs is best for down while lifts and escalators is for up, we bought a bungalow. No brainer (which is probably as well....).
DM
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 25, 2019, 06:12:28 PM
Shortly going to my first climbing lesson. They say generally it takes 3 but possible in two. Iíve been watching you tube for a week so Iíll probably be teachers pet  {-) 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on April 25, 2019, 10:26:37 PM
teachers pet!.......goodness, feed the little doggie a bone  {-)  ................. Derek


PS.... >>:-(  i'll stick to ground zero thanks  [making sawdust with my new Proxxon sander  :P ]
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 25, 2019, 10:48:39 PM
It was a good laugh tonight and me and wifey both got signed off enough to get a pass on one more lesson.
This is so funny https://youtu.be/V9hsWjA3SmU (https://youtu.be/V9hsWjA3SmU)


P.S. I guess the Proxxon is a winner then  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on April 25, 2019, 11:28:12 PM

Just watching the video made me dizzy :-X

How many times can that poor girl in the video....fall >>:-(  & get back up again?
Yes the Proxxon is great thanks


Derek


PS....the only climbing for me today will be onto a lounge bed @ the Red + ......my 81st

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 25, 2019, 11:34:13 PM
Amazing contribution  :-)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 27, 2019, 08:00:14 PM
Feels a bit cheeky to say really being retired but I'm on holiday  {-)  as if every day isn't  8)
London for a good while. Hopefully come back full of modelling withdrawal symptoms.
Hopefully on Monday I'll be getting this but no point blogging it as this is one of a couple of superb existing ones


http://wolfdenpress.net/lobster.html

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 27, 2019, 08:20:27 PM
The other http://rktman.com/rlh/boothbay/steps/steps.html
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 29, 2019, 11:39:00 AM
Back of the net  :-))
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-6c9BBWz/0/6df8674d/X4/E77EEDAB-3C31-4D8E-B662-7A93E308AA78-X4.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: C-3PO on April 29, 2019, 12:07:39 PM
Nice one Andy,

This will be an interesting build having seen the quality of your Shannon adventure...

Are you going to build as a pristine showroom example  or an old worn workhorse?

And a build blog... - I speak for myself (and I guess many others) yes please to a full build blog

PS - give the wheelie bin lid a clean :)

C-3PO
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 29, 2019, 12:20:11 PM
Itís a pavement salt bin  ;D


The two blogs I posted links to cannot really be improved on but I always post pictures  :-))
It really is a lovely traditional kit

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Boat-bits/i-VPckCq8/0/c9fe24a4/4K/E284FAB4-12FF-4799-A4E9-06A40BEB1C78-4K.jpg)

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: C-3PO on April 29, 2019, 12:23:51 PM
 :-)) :-)) :-))

Are you going to build as a pristine showroom example  or an old worn workhorse?

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 29, 2019, 12:27:09 PM
:-)) :-)) :-))

Are you going to build as a pristine showroom example  or an old worn workhorse?
I'm the crisp and colourful type  O0
The blogs are great as they stray well away from the box lid and the benefit opens up so many more options
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on April 29, 2019, 01:15:14 PM
substitute benefit with internet  %% 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 09:18:28 AM
A view from Crystal Palace shopping area
Centre stage is the Telephone.
I believe this has a viewing platform and where we are headed today


EDIT. Walkie talkie not telephone  {-)
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-fdwfTND/0/7c186ec6/4K/D0D8B5E3-5B4A-4B17-A557-C29AF91232DA-4K.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on May 02, 2019, 09:30:10 AM
Sorry Andy I am lost....is this the City of London in the far distant foreground?........ I do not recognize any new building landmarks like the Wheel


Crystal Palace was I thought a pre WW1 cast iron framed glass paneled arena complex? ................... Derek
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: C-3PO on May 02, 2019, 09:33:21 AM
Andy,

Great shot - looks more like the streets of San Francisco

Enjoy the big smoke

C-3PO
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 09:34:46 AM
London is much bigger than this view allows
The wheel is out of shot
The tall pointed building is the shard
Crystal Palace is the site of a park and the grounds of where the exhibition centre was before its destruction
Today itís the site of the BBC transmitter tower and equally famous for the mast
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 09:43:21 AM
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-NcXv8gz/0/79aa97c0/4K/EA21AADE-7807-46D6-9340-DAEC84BB12D0-4K.jpg)


(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-RMcJSQF/0/a7b7cdfd/X5/BAEA1237-5A87-46C2-A212-2F8A2CE7CCCC-X5.jpg)








Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Mark T on May 02, 2019, 05:58:58 PM
This is where I grew up. Thereís an old Victorian station underground there and occasionally they open it up to the public to view
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Mark T on May 02, 2019, 06:00:54 PM
Hereís a link


http://www.cpsubway.org.uk/[/font]
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 06:11:49 PM
Walked passed it twice today Mark
Currently closed and lots of work going on


We did nearly 14k on foot today. I never cease to be amazed at London transport.
We returned from London centre today via two tubes and one overground rail using tube guide App and Oyster card for only £2.80


Crystal Palace museum is only open Sunday and there is a guided tour at 12 this weekend
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on May 02, 2019, 06:14:50 PM
Well done for that! London can be really hard on the feet.Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 06:17:29 PM
Well done for that! London can be really hard on the feet.Colin
Donít go in Harrods  :embarrassed:  itís a maze and designed to keep you in  O0
Took ages to find the toilets even with help
 {-)


Only spent a penny  :-))
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 02, 2019, 06:41:01 PM
The conversion of Battesea Power station is an immense undertaking. One of the biggest construction projects I've seen in my lifetime. This picture only captures a small part of what is going on.
(https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Miscellaneous/i-DtG6k4k/0/f86608be/4K/7F15180A-E9B8-4BDC-BE7A-CB6F0EC1F758-4K.jpg)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 09, 2019, 06:01:48 PM
Last Sunday we did a guided tour of the site of Crystal Palace £5 each and worth every penny  :-))
Here I have found a good record of the history. So sad that it all ended.
http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/CrystalPalace.htm
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on May 09, 2019, 06:24:57 PM
My Mother used to tell us how she watched it burn down from miles away when she was a girl.
Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 09, 2019, 09:59:43 PM
There used to be an on site fire station but they closed it.
When the watchmen discovered smoke nearly two hours passed before they called the fire brigade by which time it was too late as the boiler room exploded. All the floors were wood and it was full of thousands of deck chairs
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 09, 2019, 10:00:48 PM
Tonight after our holiday break we did our second indoor climbing course and now qualified to top rope climb unsupervised  :-))
As a concession member I can now climb for only £7 per visit
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 22, 2019, 07:58:43 PM
I didnít start young enough  {-)


https://www.facebook.com/442668942581631/posts/1240305709484613?s=508612592&sfns=mo (https://www.facebook.com/442668942581631/posts/1240305709484613?s=508612592&sfns=mo)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 22, 2019, 08:35:16 PM
Nene Valley railway today. £16 adult day ticket reduced to £12 for Caravan club members. Reduced a further £2 to a tenner for old farts  :-))


https://www.facebook.com/Techno100/videos/10157100750602593/
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 23, 2019, 06:08:49 PM
I donít think Iíve broached this before? But
Caravan club members are entitled to a fuel card for Esso stations
Diesel so far has never been more than a penny per litre more than Asda and sometimes cheaper.
The scheme is operated by Pump King who set the weekly price by text message every Friday
After many years of using supermarket fuel I have found I am getting better mpg from Esso diesel too


Itís very rewarding stopping at a motorway Esso that charges upwards of £1.50 to have a price cap more like £1.30 :-) 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on May 23, 2019, 07:17:12 PM
Had a nice trip to the Isle of Wight today - flew out of Denham and landed in The Fighting Cocks pub garden near the zoo.   Had a great lunch and then flew around the island, out over the Needles and then back to Portmouth and on to Denham.   It's been a beautiful day and got a bit sunburnt from sitting in the pub garden.  :}

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 23, 2019, 07:19:55 PM
Sounds great
Yes we just sat in the Sun all day today and recharged all our batteries for tomorrow
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on May 23, 2019, 07:35:36 PM
I'd love to see the Island from a chopper.
Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on May 23, 2019, 07:41:36 PM
From certain angles, you can see almost the whole island in one go from about 1200' up.   I must say how unsafe I felt flying over water.   Really concerned about all the moving parts keeping going.   :o

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: raflaunches on May 23, 2019, 07:47:24 PM
From certain angles, you can see almost the whole island in one go from about 1200' up.   I must say how unsafe I felt flying over water.   Really concerned about all the moving parts keeping going.   :o




You should try flying to the Falklands! Especially on the return trip knowing the aircraft youíve just serviced the night before- which is awful because you know whatís wrong with it! :o
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 23, 2019, 07:49:20 PM
I had my first ten flights without ever knowing what landing felt like  {-)
Even got dropped in a tide pool after dark near Altcar  %%
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Colin Bishop on May 23, 2019, 07:56:22 PM
Quote
From certain angles, you can see almost the whole island in one go from about 1200' up.   I must say how unsafe I felt flying over water.   Really concerned about all the moving parts keeping going. 

I felt a bit like that flying over the Grand Canyon back in 2001.

Colin
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: plastic on May 23, 2019, 07:59:43 PM
I'm not sure I'd like to fly in the Grand Canyon - it's going to be a tough landing if anything goes wrong.

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 26, 2019, 08:39:59 PM
Arrived home today to a long awaited windfall from HMRC
3 yrs ago I drew my tax free personal allowance from my small pension pot and they failed to deduct tax.
Totally out of the blue Royal London sent me a letter saying they had reviewed this and paid tax out of their own pocket on my behalf and sent a new revised P60 to inland revenue.
I had to do a bit of phoning and write a letter claiming overpayment relief to HMRC and because they took so long to respond and deal with it I got interest on it too.
Basically my tax for 16/17 was already settled so the money from Royal London was surplus but on top of that they didn't just send 20% but near 32% which I can only think was as an apology? Anyway rock on Tommy! Nice toy fund  :-)


Wifey is 60 this year so it will come in handy  %)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: derekwarner on May 26, 2019, 11:37:45 PM
A little dissimilar........sometime early in 2014, I transferred a sum of hard earned $ from my Credit Union Savings account to my superannuation  Fixed Account


Sometime mid 2015, I received a Bill for our ATO for about $1500 stating that in 2014 I had exceeded my contribution limit by the same sum as transferred in 2014 >>:-(


So just a little unhappy, I commenced communications with my wonderful Superannuation people........




No no, no.....Mr Warner, our records clearly show your transfer was to your Account xxxxxxxxx/T , and that /T  means taxable and this is why the ATO have sent you the Bill  <*<


So being a good record keeper I went back to my electronic records and found my transfer in early 2014 was actually conducted not by me on my computer but at my Credit union and their print out provided on the day showed the transfer was to Account xxxxxxxxx/V ........./V is Voluntary and non taxable


So when I spoke then e-mailed the not so wonderful Super people sitting back in their Cafe-O Lays ......detail of the Credit union document confirming Account xxxxxxxxx/V ...their initial response was deafeningly silent.....


Second response ...oh.... a computer error?.......but the ATO records are set in stone and cannot be revised......so by this time my e-mails are going a little higher up in the Gold & Glass 28 floor of that Melbourne building overlooking the Yarra river and green Parkland


Some mindless Twit suggested a reversal could be achieved with the ATO, however a Government fine would be imposed against some sort of Tax withheld.......having politely reminded Mr Twit that the transaction glitch was keyed in by Ms Someone of his staff, he thought to reconsider the options


Mr Twit in a later e-mail confirmed his people had effected a reversal with the glitch with the ATO and asked if he could help with anything else .......


Some 2 weeks later, the wonderful people from the ATO posted an envelope......yes an envelope .......no letter, no explanation   {-)  ...just a Credit Note for the same $1500 and showing amount owed = Zero  %%

.........a much happier Derek
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Taranis on May 26, 2019, 11:40:33 PM
 {-) :-))