Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Technical, Techniques, Hints, and Tips => Engineering Techniques and Materials. => Topic started by: olly4950 on May 08, 2019, 03:06:03 PM

Title: Flux
Post by: olly4950 on May 08, 2019, 03:06:03 PM
Could someone tell me please what flux to buy for electrical cable/connectors?

Title: Re: Flux
Post by: TailUK on May 08, 2019, 03:30:52 PM
Usually the solder for electronics has a resin flux already incorporated in the solder.  Using a more aggressive flux could impact the components. 
Title: Re: Flux
Post by: Netleyned on May 08, 2019, 03:54:40 PM
If it is solder on a reel then it will be OK  for
joining cables/connectors.
As long as you stay clear of Plumbers sticks
of solder you should not need extra flux.
Ned
Title: Re: Flux
Post by: clockworks on May 08, 2019, 07:00:36 PM
As above, no extra flux needed for wiring if you use multicore solder. If it's not working for you, maybe the soldering iron isn't up to the job, or you aren't "tinning" the connectors/wires before making the joint?


Personally, I avoid lead-free solders. I don't think they flow as nicely as the old tin/lead solder. I buy my solder on eBay, as I don't think tin/lead solder is widely available in European retail outlets anymore.


I do use flux for larger jobs, like brass or steel parts. Flux on both parts, then "tin" with solder. Hold both parts together and apply the iron. Shouldn't need anymore solder adding at this point.
I've got a tub of "Fry Powerflow" paste flux that I've been using for well over 30 years.


Different matter for hard (silver) soldering. Flux is essential here, as the job will start oxidising before the solder melts.
Title: Re: Flux
Post by: TailUK on May 09, 2019, 09:25:28 AM
As above, no extra flux needed for wiring if you use multicore solder. If it's not working for you, maybe the soldering iron isn't up to the job, or you aren't "tinning" the connectors/wires before making the joint?


Personally, I avoid lead-free solders. I don't think they flow as nicely as the old tin/lead solder. I buy my solder on eBay, as I don't think tin/lead solder is widely available in European retail outlets anymore.


I do use flux for larger jobs, like brass or steel parts. Flux on both parts, then "tin" with solder. Hold both parts together and apply the iron. Shouldn't need anymore solder adding at this point.
I've got a tub of "Fry Powerflow" paste flux that I've been using for well over 30 years.


Different matter for hard (silver) soldering. Flux is essential here, as the job will start oxidising before the solder melts.

"MULTICORE"  That's the word I was trying to remember!!! %% %% %%
Title: Re: Flux
Post by: Netleyned on May 09, 2019, 01:21:06 PM
"MULTICORE"  That's the word I was trying to remember!!! %% %% %%
.


So was I  :D :D :D
Ned