Model Boat Mayhem

Technical, Techniques, Hints, and Tips => Detail Work, Rigging, Fittings, Figures Etc. => Topic started by: boatmadman on February 22, 2008, 09:26:07 PM

Title: Pantograph
Post by: boatmadman on February 22, 2008, 09:26:07 PM
I have just received a set of lines that are printed at 1/750 scale.

I want to scale these up to something a little(?) larger.

I tried enlarging on my scanner/copier, but it loses too much definition, so I thought of using a pantograph.

Has anyone done/tried this? And if so what were the results like?

Thanks in anticipation

Ian
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: tigertiger on February 23, 2008, 08:09:43 AM
I would assume a lot is down to the quality of the pantograph.
I understand that a panto was a standard piece of industry kit, so they must have worked.

I have tried to use a kids (toy) panto befor and it was crap. the reaon being there was flexing in the arms.
These arms were made out of the same kind of plastic as balck plastic coat hangars you get when you buy a suit.
The inertia of the pencil dragging meant there was a lag in pencil action relative to the movement of the 'pointer' on the original drawing. Then the pencil would race to catch up causing all sorts of issues. This was made worse by the joints being stiff, more inertia. the pencil squeezed into a rubber grommet, another source of flexing.

If it is a one off, you can make a panto to meet your scale needs. I imagine that wooden slats would work well, but they must be thick enough not to twist. And there should be minimal slack in the pivots at the joints, but they also must not bind.

This is a link to a standard panto, but it will only really do drawings of up to 350mm. I think you may want bigger. http://www.clp.co.uk/product.asp?Prd=020593&$$tid=JHPgipMb2yW_NnVBkG1vxExwzDWIhfv3j198upgeZvyjfJuHAwGAttkDtWlfYfKR&=
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: bogstandard on February 23, 2008, 08:27:43 AM
I have my own very little used all metal pantograph. When I used it for scaling up/down it all depends on how steady your hands are.

If you can follow a straight or curved line with a pointer, and do it with precision, no worries, but if you are like everyone else, you end up with a drawing that looks like a spider with ink on its feet has walked across the page.

I eventually used it by plotting datum points every few MM and join the dots by hand, a much neater and accurate depiction was obtained. Perfectly good and accurate enough to use as working drawings.

Hope that helped with your decision.

John
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: boatmadman on February 23, 2008, 09:34:34 AM
Thanks for that fellas, will look out for a reasonable quality item.

Ian
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: Bryan Young on February 23, 2008, 02:51:21 PM
Instead of using a pantograph have you considered using a pair of proportional dividers? Much easier to work with. My method (before I got computerised) was to mark off the original drawing into 1/2" squares ( or whatever is convenient to you).
Set the dividers up to scale you want, tighten the holding screw and that is about it, you probably will have to fiddle about with the scaling, but once done it remains as long as you need it. Use the small end for measuring and the large end for marking out your new plan grid. Then basically just copy ( freehand mmay well do it) the lines from the small squares into the larger ones. Works well, and I must admit to finding it easier, quicker, less fiddly and just as accurate as a normal ( as opposed to large industrial) items. Probably more accurate too for a non-pro draughtsman. Cheers. BY.
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: djrobbo on February 23, 2008, 07:24:44 PM
Have you thought of using a decent print or copy shop. the quality should remain good and they can scale up or down as required.  has go to be a good shop though so they really know wat they are doing...............i have used this method before with good results

           rgards.......bob.
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: dougal99 on February 23, 2008, 08:02:54 PM
If you have access to some vector software, eg Corel Draw, scan the lines, trace them using the vector software and then enlarge as required. I have done this often with good results. Also if you have half sections, which most drawings seem to have, you can easily duplicate the half and rotate it to give you the complete section.

HTH

Doug
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: bigford on February 23, 2008, 09:55:34 PM
i dont know what the u.k. equal to staples here in the states is but
staples has a 3 foot by what ever size you need printer. as long as the print
is clear you can have them enlarge it. my rotterdam lines only got a little thicker
http://www.staples.com   http://www.staples.com/sbd/cre/programs/copyandprint/images/hero1.jpg
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: sinjon on February 24, 2008, 06:26:30 AM
Yet another way.

Draw a right angle on a piece of paper,
on one side put the measurement you have,
on the other the measurement you want,
connect the two with a diagonal line.
any measurement parallel to this diagonal will be in proportion.

Colin
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: boatmadman on February 24, 2008, 06:29:24 AM
Thanks for the ideas and suggestions fella's.

The drawings I have are printed at 1:750 and I want to scale to 1:175, so I think a combination of these ideas are in order.

Ian
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: Ian Robins on February 24, 2008, 12:46:39 PM
Hi all,
      Another way is to transfer the origonal to a slide or disc and project it on a piece of paper on a wall (the distace from the wall will give different sizes) then draw over in pencil etc.
Otherwise we in northampton have a very good copy shop and they have always copied my drawings, sometimes they copy to disc then enlarge in drawing software then print to size.
hope this helps
ro88o0
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: Bryan Young on February 24, 2008, 04:44:26 PM
If you have access to some vector software, eg Corel Draw, scan the lines, trace them using the vector software and then enlarge as required. I have done this often with good results. Also if you have half sections, which most drawings seem to have, you can easily duplicate the half and rotate it to give you the complete section.

HTH

Doug
I have trouble with this program, any chance of you leading me (us) through it, step by step as if talking to a 5 year old? BY.
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: funtimefrankie on February 24, 2008, 06:42:08 PM
i dont know what the u.k. equal to staples here in the states is but
It's Staples O0...what are your Macdonalds called {-)
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: boatmadman on February 24, 2008, 07:20:29 PM
I guess its you selling the pantograph on ebay Frankie?

Ian
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: Red_Hamish on February 24, 2008, 07:33:16 PM
MacDonalds ? surely on both sides of the pond they are known as McDonalds.

No I'm not a Mc or a Mac nor taking the mickey.   O0

cheers

Jim   ;)
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: funtimefrankie on February 25, 2008, 09:52:00 PM
Allright I got my mcs mixed with my macs, but then I don't go in one of their cafes very often. (but it was only a joke) :P
And no I'm not sell a pantograph on eBay O0
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: boatmadman on February 25, 2008, 10:10:25 PM
Well, coincidence or what?

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=130200304525&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=003

Ian
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: funtimefrankie on February 26, 2008, 08:31:33 AM
Well, coincidence or what?

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=130200304525&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=003

Ian
I knew I was being stalked ::)

I use my real name on eBay...anyone want some Les Mis tickets? ends today O0
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: dougal99 on March 03, 2008, 08:59:07 PM
If you have access to some vector software, eg Corel Draw, scan the lines, trace them using the vector software and then enlarge as required. I have done this often with good results. Also if you have half sections, which most drawings seem to have, you can easily duplicate the half and rotate it to give you the complete section.

HTH

Doug
I have trouble with this program, any chance of you leading me (us) through it, step by step as if talking to a 5 year old? BY.

Bryan,

Sorry for the delay in replying I have been away for a few days. I only quoted Corel Draw as an example of a PC Vector program. I use a different platform and software. However, if you let me know what sort of problems you have I will see if I can help.

Cheers

Doug
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: Bryan Young on March 06, 2008, 07:01:34 PM
If you have access to some vector software, eg Corel Draw, scan the lines, trace them using the vector software and then enlarge as required. I have done this often with good results. Also if you have half sections, which most drawings seem to have, you can easily duplicate the half and rotate it to give you the complete section.

HTH

Doug
I have trouble with this program, any chance of you leading me (us) through it, step by step as if talking to a 5 year old? BY.

Bryan,

Sorry for the delay in replying I have been away for a few days. I only quoted Corel Draw as an example of a PC Vector program. I use a different platform and software. However, if you let me know what sort of problems you have I will see if I can help.

Cheers

Doug
Thank you. I'll bear it in mind next time I decide to open it! Ta. BY.
Title: Re: Pantograph
Post by: kiwi on April 15, 2008, 02:07:37 AM
Hi, just new here, there is a program called "Ship Wright" available on the web for us modellers to copy ships lines from paper to cad, scale as required and then print out.
I'm a professional draughtsman, and this has to be the easiest way of doing it. Beats Corel and Autocad hands down for ease of use. Don't be put off by the "manually adjusted fairing" as its a bad way of describing the process of removing any printed errors from the plans you are using, so that you get true lines.
At $69us is affordable to0. And no I have no connection to these people, simply a ship modeller same as evryone else.
Hope this helps
Kijavascript:void(0);
OKwi