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Author Topic: tid tug  (Read 7681 times)

tubby tomo

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tid tug
« on: June 07, 2008, 12:38:01 PM »

hi a good old steamer
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GaryM

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2008, 01:40:50 PM »

Beautiful tug Tomo 1 :)
I've heard "TID Tugs" mentioned a few times, is there only one "TID" or is it a generic type name IE "TID 1, TID 2 etc?  What does TID mean?

regards
Gary :)
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Shipmate60

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2008, 02:17:50 PM »

Gary,
The meaning of TID has been lost.
1 opinion is Tug Invasion Duty, but there are several. I am sure others will come up with more.

Bob
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catengineman

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2008, 02:45:36 PM »

try this

http://www.tid164.co.uk/pages/tidhist.html


I myself prefer Tug Intermediate Design

R,
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Shipmate60

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2008, 04:02:57 PM »

OR
Tug Inshore Duty

Bob
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GaryM

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2008, 10:27:02 PM »

Thanks Bob and R.
The link explains a lot, except the Meaning of "TID", but as Bob suggests, it lends towards Tug Invasion Duty and the fact that the hull was welded and not riveted and could be mass produced.
Thanks again - there must be an original meaning, I feel some research coming on. :)

regards
Gary :)
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Roger in France

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2008, 07:05:20 AM »

Or, "Tug, Innit, Dafty" !

Roger in France.
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tubby tomo

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2008, 09:06:40 PM »

hi Gary as far as i know there were a lot of tides made they were built in i think about 6 ton sections in diffrent places then transported to be welded together
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GaryM

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2008, 10:49:52 PM »

It's been bugging me! ???  It's a well known abbreviation, yet no one seems to know the exact meaning or how it got there. :(

I've had a brief search and the true meaning of TID seems allusive, as Bob said, but there must be a definitive answer. 
So far I've come up with,

Latin 'ter in die' three times a day.

"The T.I.D. class tug was designed to quickly and cheaply replace tugs lost through enemy action during World War II. Suitable vessels were also needed to support the preparations for the invasion of France.
The origin of the 'TID' abbreviation remains uncertain with interpretations varying from; 'Tug Invasion Duty' to 'Tug in Dock' to 'Tug Intermediate Design' to 'Tiddler'."  (Bob)

"The TID Story - "One Tug Per Week"
In 1943 the Ministry of War Transport decided to introduce a new class of tug. Urgent demands were made for small tugs for harbour and dock work, and to support the impending invasion preparations. The terse statement made to satisfy the needs was simple:"

"Design, organise and start work immediately toward achieving, in the shortest possible time, the delivery of one tug per week, using in the process, little or no shipyard labour."

"Contractors
Initially, contracts for making the units were awarded to

William Neill Ltd.
Foster Yates and Thom,
R.Dempster and Sons,
Charles Roberts and Co. Ltd.,
Newton Chambers and Co. Ltd.

The original order was for twelve tugs to be constructed, but when this was increased to fifty, Dunstons allocated the work so that two companies were responsible for making each section. This meant that supplies were assured if enemy bombing put one company out of business.

It makes me wonder if the name was an affectionate (or not) nick name with regards to

the way it was constructed.
the intended use.
the speed to which it was built.
a nick name given due to the 'lack of labour' used.
is TID a local word from Yorkshire.

I wonder when the name TID was given to it.  At the time? (1942 / 3) or at a later date?
Does any one recall the name being used in 1943?

regards
Gary :)
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farrow

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2008, 09:46:30 PM »

A very nice model, it has the look of a TID. I expect you know her employment history, but if not there is a good informative section in Fifty Years of Naval Tugs by Bill Hannan. Who was Chief Admiralty Pilot at Devonport and his piloting and ship handling skills were legendary there.
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tubby tomo

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2008, 06:35:36 AM »

hi rmasmaster thanks for the info  the tid looks good with a couple of lighters behind her
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Scribe

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2011, 03:20:29 PM »

TID = T.I.D. = Technicall and Industrial Developement.....I think! ok2

The result was a complete departure from normal British shipbuilding practice, in shape, in design detail and in the construction of pre-fabricated parts for the assembly of a vessel - welded, not riveted. It was an advance in technical and industrial development.

So came the "TID" tug. It was to be mass-produced and of straight-line form. The hull was designed on the 'hard chine' principle, all design lines of the same strake of plate being parallel, giving frames in straight lengths. There were to be no bent frames, and curvature in the shell would apply in one direction only, i.e., with no twist in the plates.
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Scribe

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2011, 04:49:08 PM »

I bought a secondhand TID - 1:20 scale, Kingston Mouldings - for 180 at last weeks Convention at Haydock, what a bargain! A total runner apart from a flat 12V lead acid battery! I have dumped the old 27 MHZ system fo a newer 2.4 GHz but left the old electro-mechanical speed control to see how it behaves.....that will get changed eventually I suppose, along with the motor.

I intend to re-build as TID 164 which is preserved at Chatham.....will keep you posted!





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nemesis

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2011, 08:12:24 PM »

Hello, TID " Tug inside Dockyard" By the freeing ports being small gives a clue plus they were underpowered for pulling things across the channel. Working on the terminology ie LCT =" landing craft, tank" it is an easy assumption to make. Nemesis
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farrow

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2011, 09:38:31 PM »

I did read an interesting article about them in a old book which refered to them as Tug/ Inshore/ Docks, which is what they where used for small ships and lightrage work in rivers and docks, they where never that powerful or seaworthy enough to pke thier noses outside of smooth water limits.
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meechingman

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2011, 10:27:48 AM »

We had plenty of ex TID's here at Newhaven over the years. Tidworth was one of our own Railway-owned tugs, and there was a company based here called Metrec that bought up a lot of them for scrapping or conversion to diesel. Tug, Inshore/Dock was what we were told.
Andy
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TailUK

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2011, 06:09:00 PM »

It's been bugging me! ???  It's a well known abbreviation, yet no one seems to know the exact meaning or how it got there. :(

I've had a brief search and the true meaning of TID seems allusive, as Bob said, but there must be a definitive answer. 
So far I've come up with,

Latin 'ter in die' three times a day.

"The T.I.D. class tug was designed to quickly and cheaply replace tugs lost through enemy action during World War II. Suitable vessels were also needed to support the preparations for the invasion of France.
The origin of the 'TID' abbreviation remains uncertain with interpretations varying from; 'Tug Invasion Duty' to 'Tug in Dock' to 'Tug Intermediate Design' to 'Tiddler'."  (Bob)

"The TID Story - "One Tug Per Week"
In 1943 the Ministry of War Transport decided to introduce a new class of tug. Urgent demands were made for small tugs for harbour and dock work, and to support the impending invasion preparations. The terse statement made to satisfy the needs was simple:"

"Design, organise and start work immediately toward achieving, in the shortest possible time, the delivery of one tug per week, using in the process, little or no shipyard labour."

"Contractors
Initially, contracts for making the units were awarded to

William Neill Ltd.
Foster Yates and Thom,
R.Dempster and Sons,
Charles Roberts and Co. Ltd.,
Newton Chambers and Co. Ltd.

The original order was for twelve tugs to be constructed, but when this was increased to fifty, Dunstons allocated the work so that two companies were responsible for making each section. This meant that supplies were assured if enemy bombing put one company out of business.

It makes me wonder if the name was an affectionate (or not) nick name with regards to

the way it was constructed.
the intended use.
the speed to which it was built.
a nick name given due to the 'lack of labour' used.
is TID a local word from Yorkshire.

I wonder when the name TID was given to it.  At the time? (1942 / 3) or at a later date?
Does any one recall the name being used in 1943?

regards
Gary :)


I've looking at pics of T.I.D. Tugs with a veiw to building one soon and seems that they were known as TID's as some carried the abbreviation and their build number during wartime.
I'm also told , although I can't verify this, that TID stood for "Tugs Inshore and Docks"
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tugnut

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2011, 07:41:52 PM »

Hi all i have recently got a TID tug , i am not sure about the funnel i think its to fat for a tid.

John
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TailUK

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Re: tid tug
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2011, 08:10:16 AM »

The Funnel diameter on a TID was 3'9" but with knowing the scale of your tug it 's not possible to say how big that is on the model.
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tubby tomo

  • Guest
Re: tid tug
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2011, 09:28:05 AM »



    hi i think the diameter looks a bit to wide but a very nice model   :-))
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