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Author Topic: Deck Planking  (Read 3510 times)

woodforc

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Deck Planking
« on: October 20, 2008, 10:31:44 AM »

Just about to start planking the deck of my Mountfleet Boston Typhoon (don't like the printed sheets) but which is the best timber, where to get it from, and how much do you need (has anyone planked a Boston Typhoon deck before)?
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Proteus

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2008, 10:45:56 AM »

Just at tip think about a sub deck of 1/64 ply fit to hull, remove and do the decking on the bench where it is easy to work on. then when finished bond it down .. lime makes nice decking as the grain is fine and it is nice to work with and if you want to stain or put a wash on its uniform so it looks good, its nice to cut for jogeling the ends in .I use aliphatic resin or yellow glue. followed by Matt ronseal.and card for corking

Proteus
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Proteus

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2008, 10:54:21 AM »

Just a question for some of the old Sea Dogs is there normaly a gap between the planking and the bulwarks that forms a channel prob around 6" to 9"  for water to drain like a gutter. ???

Proteus,
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2008, 11:10:04 AM »

Yes, you do need to include a waterway inside the bulwarks. About six inches should be OK.

Needs to look something like this.

Colin
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Proteus

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2008, 11:14:58 AM »

I did it that way  on mine because I remember seeing it  like that on a ferry I was on years ago, (don't go on boats very often) and did not want to give mis information to woodforc

Proteus
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2008, 11:39:07 AM »

Just a question for some of the old Sea Dogs is there normaly a gap between the planking and the bulwarks that forms a channel prob around 6" to 9"  for water to drain like a gutter. ???

Proteus,

Certainly is, it directs the wash-off into the scuppers which are then located in the bottom of this drain channel.

By the way proteus where do you get Ronseal matt?  I have tried everywhere for this very purpose and can only find satin.

I also used lime for mine, a good supplier is here:

http://www.euromodels.co.uk/classic/wood.htm


I used 5mm x 1mm planks over a 1mm ply base.  I think I estimated the correct width should be 4.5mm so I went for 5.  If you are going to consider the removal technique described above take care if the deck is cambered as you will get very little flexibility with the laminated structure you will end up with.

As for quantity, do an estimate then double it.  I am not kidding, you will never estimate the wastage correctly, you will run out and not be able to get the wood you want just when you really need it, you can always find other uses for leftovers for it and at 30-40p per plank it is just not worth skimping on it.  You also never quite know when you get the next batch whether a change in colour or grain may be noticeable or not.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2008, 11:46:13 AM »

Ronseal matt (Polyurethane variety) can usually be obtained at specialist hardware stores if you can't find it in B&Q/Homebase. Cheapest place is probably Wilkinsons if you have one within reach - there is one in Huddersfield. http://www.wilkinsonplus.com/

Colin
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Proteus

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2008, 11:52:15 AM »

Chambered decks as long as you tack a couple of strips on the under side before you start its no problem , mine only had a slight camber on anyway so it bent witout problems ,
 my ronseal came from b+q some years ago and I only use a small amount so will last forever

Proteus
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BarryM

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2008, 07:45:10 PM »

As a general rule, most vessels will have scuppers that collect water which then drains into a scupper pipe (upper decks) or overboard via a lightening hole (main weather deck) but as always there are exceptions. Thus, if you cannot determine what your vessel had, check out those of a similar age, size and duty.

Regards,

Barry M
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nhp651

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2008, 07:59:26 PM »

those scuppers, which shed the water to the freeing ports on the trawler (on Fleetwood trawlers noteably- as i used to work my summer hols on them as a ships victualler and equipment supplier with CoSalt at Fleetwood) were always laid down with concrete.........the concrete ( instead of raw steel) helped the fishermen to grip in their sea boots when leaning over the bullwarks whilst hand hauling the nets.
On all the trawlers I have built I have always represented this concrete with a layer of glue with a sprinkling of fine builders sand poured over and left to set before painting matt grey.
That was until I found a paint in a dolls house shop that had grit impregnated in to it and at the right colour.I've used that since. :-))

Another tip when planking is to mix some black food colouring into the glue for gluing down the planks.......having tried all sorts of things to represent the tar caulking between the planks including drawing the edge of each plank with black felt pen, laying black cotton between the planks and laying thin strips of black card and then sanding all off, I have found that the black coloured glue gives a very realistic caulking effect, with very little cleaning off as a finished job. O0
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Jim

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2008, 01:23:12 AM »

For my Boston Typhoon I too used a 1/64 ply base for the planked deck, and it certainly makes life so much easier, as already mentioned .  My planks were 1/32 ply glued with Evostick wood glue onto the base, which I then fixed to the deck with epoxy resin. I chose a good straight and fine grained ply sheet for the planks, very lightly stained it to my preferred tone and then varnished with Ronseal Matt (polyurethane, not the quick drying stuff which I think is far inferior). Then I cut the ply into strips, sanded them to uniform width and applied black felt tip pen to the edges to represent the caulking (the initial varnish prevents felt tip ink seeping onto the plank surface). I cut my planks to 20 foot scale lengths (about 190mm at 1:32 scale) and staggered them to give a 5 plank joint seperation.

I fashioned a margin strip around the perimeter of the planking. This allowed the plank joggling referred to in the earlier post. It is a real pain to get right, but looks so good and the end result is really satisfying. Golden rule is that the planks never taper to a sharp point (eg. at the curve of the bows), but that the plank ends are cut to 1/3 width at the joggling. I painted the edges of the deck composite to hide the various ply laminations.

By using ply planks, the cost is kept low and the result is very impressive. I have used lime (lovely wood to work with) planking on other models but don't think there is any significant improvement in end result that justifies the additional cost. Regarding the potential problem of fixing the composite planked structure to the camber of the deck, the forecastle section is not a compound curve, so no problem.  The well deck and aft deck have both camber and shear, but there are large apertures in these planked areas, so should not present difficulties fitting to the compound deck shape - it was no prob on my BT.  A possible limitation with the planking method described is that you will not be able to sand out any irregularities in the surface, without affecting any previous staining or possibly exposing ply laminates. So care must be made to set the planking to a fairly even level.

Jim

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Proteus

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Re: Deck Planking
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2008, 02:11:53 AM »

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