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Author Topic: PLAN BUILD NUMBER 4: DRIFTER/TRAWLER FREDERICK SPASHETT  (Read 32651 times)

John W E

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Re: PLAN BUILD NUMBER 4: DRIFTER/TRAWLER FREDERICK SPASHETT
« Reply #50 on: November 13, 2008, 08:37:36 PM »


So, the construction of the Capstan.    We first have to construct the base unit; which is constructed from 3 circles of 1mm Plasticard and some 6mm balsa wood.   The larger of the circles forms the actual seating face and the 2 smaller circles sandwich the balsa wood.   We then true the circles up and wrap Plasticard around the edge of the balsa wood thus creating a 'top hat' affair.

We next have to construct the capstan itself (the part which actually revolves) and this is made from Plasticard as well - only we use tubing for the main body of it.   A circle on both bottom and top of the tube, thus forming a drum shape.

This was then all glued together liquid poly - the next stage is then to divide the circumference of the tube into 8 equal segments.    Then, we require 8 pieces of timber; which length is equal to the inside measurement of the drum from top to bottom.

We then glue the 8 pieces of timber evenly spaced around the inside tube - when the glue has dried (I used Superglue for this).  When the Superglue has dried, I then make up a mandrel from a nut and bolt and then fit this through the capstan drum I have made.   The whole assembly is then fitted into the chuck of the Dremel drill which I have, and, then with the aid of half round file and some sandpaper, I form the concave radius in the timber around the drum; carefully to avoid knocking off the bits of wood.   When I had finished this, I removed it from the mandrel and then searched through the odds and ends drawer for a Plastic cog which would fit around the base of the drum, to represent the locking ratchet.  This whole assembly ‘top hat and cog and capstan drum’ were given an undercoat of green paint.   Then, I constructed the drive mechanism which sits on the top of the drum; this again, was made from Plasticard and balsa wood – with balsa strips glued on the top to represent folds in casings.  Bits of old Airfix kits were used to represent pulleys and shafts which are located on the side of the casing; this then again was given a coat of paint and set to one side.  Sometime in the future, I will put a drawing on to help with the explanation of the making of this.

The next thing to make is the winch unit for the nets.
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John W E

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Re: PLAN BUILD NUMBER 4: DRIFTER/TRAWLER FREDERICK SPASHETT
« Reply #51 on: November 19, 2008, 07:49:19 PM »

Just before we carry on – there are a few pictures of the capstan in its bare state and also a diagram showing how it was made.  The reason I don’t put sizes on, is, that folk may wish to make this to a different scale than I have and therefore if I put dimensions on they may be confusing.
   
Whilst we are off the topic, it may be good to broach on the electrics – as in a speed controller.  Like everything else in life, some people do have their favourite electrical stuff  & in today’s market there isn’t a great deal of difference in the majority of them; which are available for marine use.   I can hear people shouting AH BUT THERE IS!

When I say there isn’t a great difference – what I mean is – they all work on a similar principle of switching the main power off and on rapidly and therefore increasing/decreasing the speed.  To me, the big difference is, when it comes to the manufacturers – I have had and do use several speed controllers.  These come from the ‘land of the rising sun’ and other places around that area.   Yes, they are very ‘inexpensive’ and they do – do the job.   The only drawback is though, the human error, which is the largest problem in electronics.   Do you realise if it wasn’t for human input/tampering the majority of electronics components would last for years and years – doing their job quite merrily for what they were designed for.   It is only when we stick the ex-factor in that things do start to go wrong - the ex-factor being the human element.
 
If we have one of these sealed units from abroad/home company/i.e. well known Company who imports them – and they go wrong – there is very little which can be done.   Some times you may get them repaired at a price, but, very rarely – sometimes it is just as inexpensive to purchase a new one – but how many times do we do this?

This is the main reason I tend to lean towards the manufacturers who we can speak to  - either face to face or on the telephone – if we do make mistakes WHICH WE ALL DO right from the very experienced person…to the newcomer to the hobby.   It is so nice to speak to the person on the end of the phone – who actually made the speed controller and they normally will guide you through all the pitfalls – so then we make less mistakes wiring these things up.

The speed controller for this model, then, the one I purchased was an ACTion P80 Condor.  This comes either readily-made up or you may do a kit yourself which I enjoy doing.   It adds that little extra bit to your build.   Now this P80 Condor is rated at 20 amps which, is a lot of overkill and a big mistake on my behalf.   Not that it isn’t any good for the motor/model but it is just that it will put a large margin of safety in; meaning, if I fit a 15 amp fuse in on the positive side between the battery and the speed controller and the propeller becomes jammed with weeds /obstructed in some form whilst sailing….the stall current of the motor must reach 15 amps before the fuse will blow.    This is well within the capabilities of the speed controller, but, my poor little motor is going to get rather HOT – so I am still going to use this speed controller, but, only going to put a 10 amp fuse in.   Pictures of the speed controller installation will come at the end; because, at this stage, I have just finished making the kit up and then testing it.

If we actually wish to fit the speed controller into the model now, at this stage of build, it has more advantages; because we will not be prone to knocking bits of fittings (which we have fitted) off the build.

Now finished that bit waffle – and back on to making the winch.  :-))

On the plan there are only 2 views of the winch, being the side view and the top view; so, yet again – we have to literally trawl through books and on the Web for pictures, not of fish, but of a winch which is similar to the one on this vessel.   The winch I came across on the web, comes from and this will sort us all out  - can you remember where Tony Blackburn did his first radio show from – remember Radio Caroline – well apparently the vessel is under restoration and I found a picture of the winch on the web.  Apart from being side tracked.and that is the picture I used to base my winch on.    The winch itself is all made from Plasticard and plastic tubing – with a couple of bits of brass wire and 2 bits of wood which have been turned to represent the end cable drums.
 
Instead of trying to explain how I made this winch, what I will do is put some photographs & a drawing here on this thread.

I would if it would be possible to keep the questions and answers to this build until the very end - and I will answer you all then   :-))  thank you one and all



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John W E

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Re: PLAN BUILD NUMBER 4: DRIFTER/TRAWLER FREDERICK SPASHETT
« Reply #52 on: December 06, 2008, 08:40:39 PM »

All finished

AUF WIEDERSEHEN PET


John
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