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Author Topic: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug  (Read 12926 times)

Brian Roberts

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2009, 09:52:23 PM »

Hi Chingdevil
I've recently converted a Seaport tug to my own spec. with an esc, new radio, rudder linkage etc. put it all back together again (bit of head scratching!) and with an audience of two eager grandchildren put it on the water. Hey presto! It promptly fell over, most embarassing!
The moral of this story is make sure you have adequate ballast in the boat. Not trying to tell you how to suck lemons but I notice that your water inlets under the boat have been sealed off so I think you will need quite a lot of lead to bring the hull down.
Myself, being a smart a..e tested the boat in the bath before putting the superstructure back on and it seemed OK. How are the mighty fallen!!
Brian
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2009, 10:00:24 PM »

When this was done the front part of the superstructure fitted nicely over the coamings, as you can see from this picture I did recycle some of the other superstructures that is why the back part is grey.
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2009, 10:09:13 PM »

Hi Brian

I started to update this build log because the conversion is a lot further along than this thread is. This picture was taken last week on the first bottom wetting of Bereki. She has one 6v 4ah SLA battery inside and one Hitec RX reciever battery, no other weight, she sits actually sit slightly high for me.
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Brian Roberts

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2009, 10:36:02 PM »

 Thanks, looking good.
Brian
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ralphhager

  • Ralph1937
  • Shipmate
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  • Posts: 21
  • Location: Antelope, CA USA
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2009, 12:15:42 AM »

This has to be the best conversion yet for the Seaport & Dickie Tug.  I have been sitting on 2 Dickie Tug to convert for my Grandkids for the past 4 years.  I feel now with your thread I can do a major conversion to both my tugs.  I especially like the way you replace knot nozzle with a straight rudder and how you did your steering servo, very good ideas.    Great job Mr. chingdevil  :-))
Ralph1937 :-)
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #30 on: May 08, 2009, 09:11:47 PM »

By the way Ralph when you do your conversions remember to put a screw in the steering servo before fitting the deck, I did not and after its first run the steering failed and I had to cut a hole for another hatch to get to the servo and fix it >>:-( >>:-( >>:-( >>:-( >>:-(


Brian
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2009, 09:23:26 PM »

After building the main part of the superstructure I then went on and built the rear part scribing the lower edge to get it to fit the deck. At this time I also built the wheelhouse. The only entrance to the wheel house is via the outside, on the roof is some wooden lathes as treads. I wanted to show these so, I cut a strip of masking tape about 5mm wide and held it down with weights. I then took some microstrip .04 x .03 and cut it to a rough length and then stuck it onto the masking tape. I then cut the strip to the length I wanted, removed the weights from the tape and stuck this into position on the roof then stuck the strip down. When all was dry I removed the masking tape and made sure the strip was stuck down along its length.
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #32 on: May 08, 2009, 09:27:01 PM »

You can see from these shots the superstructure with its portholes and doors fitted. Also the shape of the wheelhouse, I have also fitted the bar that protects the superstructure from the towing rope (I do not know what that is called). This bar is a wire covered in plastic, brought at Warwick last year from SHG, it is nice to bend and is strong
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #33 on: May 08, 2009, 09:34:07 PM »

I thought I would have a rest from breathing plastic fumes and build the funnel. The funnel is made from 15mm brass tube 120mm long. I put one end into a vice and squashed it to get an oval shape at the top while keeping it round at the bottom
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2009, 09:45:49 PM »

I then cut the top at a 45deg angle and cleaned all the burrs off it. I the drilled a couple of 3.5mm holes and also cut some vent slots in the down from the top with a Dremel cutting disc. I made a small plate 3mm thick and screwed a 3mm brass screw into it and then soldered that. Bent a piece of 5mm brass tube to get the angle of the exhaust stack, and then soldered that to a piece of 3mm brass. the whole lot was then soldered into position. Everything given a polish with a sanding disc to get rid of any scratches, Halfords grey primer and satin black finish the job.
The black tubes were going to be fibre optic lights, but I could not get it to bend tight enough and hold its position, so no lights on the funnel >:-o I might find some thinner fibre optics at a latter date and retro fit
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dan

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2009, 09:46:40 PM »

looking very nice  O0
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #36 on: July 01, 2009, 04:55:16 PM »

Back after another delay due to work  and home commitments.

OK when I made the funnel I also made the towing hook and towing beam.
The three parts to the hook can be seen in the first picture, strange how bad the filing looks when you take photos of an item. The "u" piece is one of those 7mm brass shackles you can get from Redbanks Models. I can not remember how long the flat piece is but it is 3mm thick, the hook part is a piece of brass rod bent and attacked with a file.
The second picture shows the hook mounted on the beam, the beam is 8mm square wood superglued together. The old shackle part is soldered to the back plate, which has two dress making pins through it and superglued into the wood. The hook support hoop is 1.6mm s/s welding rod, again superglued into the wood. There was a touch more cleaning to be done to the hook in that picture.
In the third picture the two support legs can be seen, these are pieces of brazing rod superglued into the wood. The holes they go into in the deck have blocks of 10mm square wood glued underneath to stop the tow beam wobbling





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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2009, 05:15:38 PM »

On the original boat the towing beam had supports into the deck, I wanted to replicate this but make the beam removable when i needed to remove the superstructure.

I made a jig up from a piece of 4mm thick s/s plate with the corner cut off  so the plastic did not bind as it was bent around the jig. I then cut some 8mm channel which has 1.2mm sides 70mm long. Cut some notches in the channel and bent it around the jig held it in place with masking tape while the plastic weld dried. At the same time I cut some small pieces of plastic strip to go over the joins, the idea being that I could file them close to flat and they would add some support to the channel. Unfortunately as you can see in one picture I caught one of the pieces when it was stuck on the wood and it broke, had to be re-glued. I took a small bradel type tool and made some indentations on the reverse of the channel to make it look like it was riveted to the wood and the deck








Rest of images in next post
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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #38 on: July 01, 2009, 05:18:58 PM »












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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #39 on: August 01, 2009, 06:21:07 PM »

I fitted the handrail on the top of the superstructure, the posts I brought from Redbanks and the wire is 1amp fusewire. I painted the supports first and then cleaned off one side of the end ones, so I could solder the wire. The picture shows some of the supports leaning caused by using too much heat for the soldering, so I had to unsolder restick the supports and then resolder. I wanted the wire to hang down like it would naturally, it is not too bad but not perfect. To the right of the hand rails is a small brass tube with a nut, this is where the aerial is put in. The tube was threaded 8BA and then fixed on the superstructure roof, I put a small lug underneath with a small plug and socket on it so I could disconnect the aerial when the superstructure is removed. I made the plug and socket from the male and female pins used to make up your own D plugs. I believe Maplin sell them I got mine from RS the pins were covered with shrink sleeve so they did not touch anything and cause a problem








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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2009, 06:29:46 PM »

On the roof of the superstructure are three small cups these were to hold the aerial in place, the Aeriel is held down with very thin elstic coloured black. The lights on the aerial are 2mm acrylic rod painted black at each end. The aerial is plastic coated steel rod stuck with superglue







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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #41 on: August 01, 2009, 06:39:08 PM »

On the back of the superstructure on the full size tug is a fire hydrant and a hose cabinet. the cabinet is two pieces of 2mm plasticard stuck together and then filed to shape, the top is another piece of plasticard again filed to shape. The hydrant was a trial, the backing disk was cut out of 1mm plasticard the two pipes are plastic tube the valve bodies are square plastic filed round. The handles of the valves were made by drilling a hole in a piece of wood the diameter I wanted, then using a pin punch punching through a piece of 1mm plasticard. The ends of the hydrant are just plastic rod cut and shaped.
The steps next to the hydrant are 2.5mm plastic angle shaped and stuck on

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chingdevil

  • Guest
Re: Seaport Tug to Bareki Tug
« Reply #42 on: August 01, 2009, 06:45:11 PM »

The bollards are 6mm beech with grooves filed into them to hold the rope, the bottom of the bollards has a 1mm brass rod in them so if the bollards are knocked they should stay in place. The hooks on the bollards are cleats cut in half filed down and then superglued in position. A couple of coats of Halfords satin black and then stuck in position, would not hold a fly in position but look effective


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