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Author Topic: Working with Plasticard  (Read 23831 times)

Colin Bishop

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #50 on: January 24, 2009, 01:20:16 PM »

Plastic Padding also do a gelcoat filler for full size boats. Similar to the standard product but white. Available at marine chandlers.

Colin
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barriew

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #51 on: January 24, 2009, 05:56:39 PM »

When using Styrene, if your joint is not perfect, can P38 be used to fill any gaps or is their another product available.
Martin down under

Martin, you can use P38, but I prefer to use Squadron White Putty (they also do a green one). This is finer than P38, and being white easier to paint over particularly on white superstructure :-))

Barrie

Barrie,

Is that a fairly common product? Do you think I can find it in a hobby shop in OZ. Maybe buy it online from the UK - Which hobby shop do you think I can order it from.

Martin

I got my last tube from Cornwall Model Boats, but its an American product I believe, used by the model aircraft brigade, so I would think the chances of finding it in Oz are quite good. Failing that I can offer a personal delivery service - I will be in Oz in just over 2 weeks {-)


Barrie
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DickyD

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #52 on: January 24, 2009, 06:00:03 PM »

Styrene to balsa Martin, you need superglue.

You can use P38 filler or over here we have Humbrol filler or 2 part Lilliput filler which is like a putty and comes in white or brown.  :-))

G'Day Richard,

Doesn't that Lilliput 2 part filler sets like concrete. 2 sticks, peel equal quantities of each, squash together till one consistant colour and apply - or am I thinking of something else {:-{

Martin
Thats the stuff, use it all the time Martin.

Also sticks to most things.
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oldiron

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #53 on: January 24, 2009, 06:14:37 PM »

  If I'm fastening, gluing, styrene to balsa, or any wood, I've found water based contact cement works excellent. Acts like regular contact cement, but doesn't warp plastic and stays under any circumstance. Cyano works well for small areas, if the styrene is roughened first. However, contact cement works perfect for larger areas.

John
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boatmadman

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #54 on: January 24, 2009, 06:15:40 PM »

Can anyone advise me as to the best way to produce a truncated cone using plastic card?

Trying to make the foremast for HMS Hermes so far without success!

Rex

Rex,

Scribe a circle onto the card so that the circumference is larger than that required for the base of the cone. calculate the circumference of the base of the cone and mark that length onto the circumference of the circle drawn first. This will be less than the whole circumference. Next, draw a line from each end of the shorter arc to the centre of the circle, mark the length required for the cone height on this line, then scribe another circle, using the origional centre so that this circle passes through the marks on the line, cut out, roll edges together and I think you should have what you want.
No doubt there is an easier way, but thats how I do it!
Good luck
Ian
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oldiron

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #55 on: January 24, 2009, 06:15:50 PM »

pics of a deck done with contact cement:
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John W E

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #56 on: January 24, 2009, 07:26:05 PM »

hi there

just for interest  - all the hull plating which I put on the Frederique Spashett was put on using Superglue or Cyano as some call it.  I did try a product called Deep Bond - but it wasnt very successful - the plates peeled off.   Deep Bond is a form of a contact adhesive - even though I had roughed the surface of the hull and also the plates to be secured, when the bond had cured after 24 hours, the plates easily peeled off.

I found though with Superglue (if you made any mistakes positioning the plates and the glue had gone off) it destroyed the plate whilst trying to remove it to correct it.

aye
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Martin13

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #57 on: January 24, 2009, 07:48:11 PM »


Martin, you can use P38, but I prefer to use Squadron White Putty (they also do a green one). This is finer than P38, and being white easier to paint over particularly on white superstructure :-))

Barrie

Martin

I got my last tube from Cornwall Model Boats, but its an American product I believe, used by the model aircraft brigade, so I would think the chances of finding it in Oz are quite good. Failing that I can offer a personal delivery service - I will be in Oz in just over 2 weeks {-)


Barrie

Barrie. Where in Oz will you be visiting.

Martin du
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Martin13

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #58 on: January 24, 2009, 09:23:55 PM »

Styrene to balsa Martin, you need superglue.

You can use P38 filler or over here we have Humbrol filler or 2 part Lilliput filler which is like a putty and comes in white or brown.  :-))

Dicky,

May have mislead you on that Lilliput. The stuff I used with the two sticks was MILLIPUT. I used it on Brave Borderer Mk 1 and set so hard that I had a lot of problems sanding or even filing the filler. I will not use it anymore - too hard to work with.

Is the Lilliput filler different or the same as Milliput??

Also, some time ago I purchased some Stabilit Express but have not used it so far. Does this stuff set hard like the Milliput??

Martin du
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DickyD

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #59 on: January 24, 2009, 09:32:53 PM »

Sorry Martin, spelling mistake, should have read Milliput. Senility setting in.

Stabilit Express does set hard and also costs to much.

Humbrol filler is OK for plstics but takes a while to harden.
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Shipmate60

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #60 on: January 24, 2009, 11:36:17 PM »

Dicky,
Milliput is 2 pack epoxy so can be harder than the plasticard.

Bob
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Umi_Ryuzuki

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #61 on: January 25, 2009, 12:49:21 AM »

Hi Umi, the plasticard work looks great, and I think I may have seen the later pictures on another site illuminated , if so have you got any pictures of the underside as the small lights are so crisp without any of the light bleeding out, also what is the modeling knife you have with the rubber grip it looks like it may help me be able to hold a knife better, have you a name /make for it

thanks again and very nice as usual

Proteus

The original consoles were built up first in styrene on a renshape(polyurethane)  block.
The consoles were then molded and cast. The lighted pieces are solid clear polyurethane castings.

The modeling knife is from Xacto, #X3723?

.
.
.

For modeling cones, use this calculator...

http://www.realmcommunications.com/rblaske/shroudcalc/shroudcalc.htm
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Proteus

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #62 on: January 25, 2009, 01:16:48 AM »

thank you for that.

Proteus
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Umi_Ryuzuki

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #63 on: January 25, 2009, 02:12:33 AM »

Heres a picture of all three stages...
and the 17" LED monitor... Which are also  originally
made out of styrene or the brown renshape.

 :-)
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Proteus

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #64 on: January 25, 2009, 02:22:46 AM »

very nice, the screens are magic , any chance of a bit more info on how you did the screens they are great.. I have orderd the knife on ebay from the USA,

Proteus
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Martin13

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #65 on: January 25, 2009, 02:33:09 AM »

Heres a picture of all three stages...
and the 17" LED monitor... Which are also  originally
made out of styrene or the brown renshape.

 :-)

Now I know what I'm going to ask Santa  next Christmas - to be able to model like Umi - that's brilliant workmanship :-)) :-))

Martin down under
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Seaspray

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #66 on: January 25, 2009, 10:19:43 AM »

Hi Umi    :-))

I've had an Xacto knife years ago. Found that the end (screws up holding the blade) which secured the blade kept undoing as you worked and used pliers to really tighten it up, also found it uncomfortable to use. I see you have something over the end on your knife.
Each to there own.

Seaspray
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TCC

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #67 on: January 25, 2009, 10:36:53 AM »

Styrene to balsa Martin, you need superglue.

You can use P38 filler or over here we have Humbrol filler or 2 part Lilliput filler which is like a putty and comes in white or brown.  :-))

Does that come in small tubes? :-)
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TCC

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #68 on: January 25, 2009, 11:02:15 AM »

Heres a picture of all three stages...
and the 17" LED monitor... Which are also  originally
made out of styrene or the brown renshape.

 :-)

Umi can I ask?

I think I know what you've done. You've made your finished items in translucent resin in which you place a white LED, right? Well how did you light the thin LCD?

If it's an LED (which I think it is) is that moulded in while the resin is wet or do you drill a hole in the final piece and have it replacable?

Another thing is that 17 LCD doesn't look thick enough to take a 3mm LED.

I'm just curious what you've done.

Another question that springs to mind is how you stopped light 'bleed' through the painted walls? Is it just many copats of paint?

Cheers mate, loved the workmanship.
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Umi_Ryuzuki

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #69 on: January 25, 2009, 06:41:52 PM »

Thanks all,

RE, the LED monitors.

The LED is cast into the piece while the resin is still  liquid.
Silly me, I sand the sides of the LED down to make a thin profile.
I am trying to find a source for square LED, that are only 1.2mm thick.

The most difficult part of producing the monitors is getting the air bubbles out.
I would guess I am only having a 60 percent success rate at making these.

Stopping bleed through was two coats of white paint, and two coats of black plus
some touch up at the corners. Colored buttons were created by adding a dash of
translucent paint to the surface after the glowing area was scrapped clean.
I picked up some "airbrush" media  to try to reduce the paint build up.
I felt that this first set of panels got a bit muddied.

Here is a 1/48 scale z drive control panel built up in styrene.
I hope to cast these clear, and then people can build up their
own cabinet out of wood or styrene and place the Lamp or LED
inside. The back side is set so that the panel can be left squared, or
the corner can be cut off to fit a Damen style pilot house.

Most of the cementing on the styrene was done with thin CA or
some version of MEK

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oldiron

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #70 on: January 26, 2009, 09:19:38 PM »

Adding to the list of fillers that are available to the modeler I offer up the "Body Icing". Its used by automotive body shops to smooth over an auto body before final priming and painting. The material goes on extremely smoothly and sands equally well. It is excellent for hulls and wood finished surfaces, but works equally well on plasticard, and fiberglass and , of course, metal surfaces.
  Its a two part material. That is to say you have to mix a small amount of hardener with the Icing to make it go off. The result is durable and very paintable. Although Squadron Green and other similar body putties are good, this stuff comes in BIG volumes, so is much better and more cost effective for larger surfaces.

John
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TCC

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #71 on: January 27, 2009, 01:26:04 PM »


I sand the sides of the LED down to make a thin profile.

I was going to suggest that to you, looks like you're ahead of me on that one.  :-)

Thanks for getting back to me.
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Seaspray

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #72 on: January 27, 2009, 05:15:20 PM »

Just finished reading Richard Webb's book for the second time.

Very interesting, informative and will have a go at some small projects for practice in working with plasticard.

Having jogged my memory, back in 1980 I used plasticard to make a shape of a light bulb and remember it was awful brittle plastic to work with. It was heated in the oven and I used the hoover to suck all the air out of the mould to give me the shape. It worked but haven't touched it since then because of the brittleness. Looking at the new plasticard I've got now. I think it has changed  to be more better to work with

Seaspray
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nemesis

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #73 on: October 17, 2009, 12:35:02 PM »

Hi, I was once told by an experienced modeller that styrene / plasticard had a life of about 20 years,
he was also a chemist (industrial). I also know of models that are older than that, I think the secret is to paint the inside as well, to cover the joints to stop the air getting in, oxygen is a distroyer along
with UV. How many glass cased models have bits dropping off for no apparent reason?
                                               Nemesis
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Bryan Young

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Re: Working with Plasticard
« Reply #74 on: October 20, 2009, 08:07:37 PM »

If you are still not convinced about the effectiveness of double-sided tapethen may I suggest you buy a (good quality) roll and clag a bit of plasticard of any thickness to it, wait a couple of minutes and then try to seperate the 2 bits. You will be a bit surprised. BY.
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