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Author Topic: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug  (Read 5450 times)

Globs

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Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« on: January 21, 2009, 09:30:20 PM »

Hi People,

I'm restoring a tugboat known as the Flying Duck, Glasgow, built from EMap plans some decades ago. I'll post some pictures up when I get some of it, I've finished basic cleaning + moving the rudder servo to the rear (to get the linkage out of the way) and installing an old 28V motor - so I'll be able to see if 12V is enough tomorrow.
Else I'll have to upgrade to 24V and a new ESC!

The original model was made by my Uncle John, who I am discovering was a model making genius, even the radar head rotated (but the mechanics haven't lasted) so I'll working up the model, starting with getting the stand off, polishing up the hull with Auto-Glym paint renovator and Meguliars Clear Coat, recoating the stand, unbending the shaft, re-greasing, moving the rudder control, installing motor and rather unusual mounting etc.

After that it'll be cabin work (radar from an old servo, lighting (cabin lights from Rapid Electronics SMD white leds planned).
Also some water-dam cabin woodwork so she can survive a decent water splosh over the side - big scuppers already you see :)

Tomorrow on the pond I'll also discover the correct position for the battery - currently an NP7 12V for simplicity.

Cheers,

G
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barryfoote

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2009, 09:13:41 AM »

Well that has whetted the appetite. Let's have some photos now......and welcome to the forum.

Barry
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Globs

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2009, 11:46:49 AM »

Hi Barry & cheers!

The original:



As it arrived!



Getting the stand off!



The old steering linkage - this needed a long pushrod in the main open area, which I wanted clear for the new drive system.



The progress of creating the new motor mount and gluing in the new servo mounts



The shaft needed greasing - but I was not sure how to get the prop off, so I used a high-pressure method...



which worked well, the hull is shiny here as this has been polished up and waxed in the meantime. BIG prop!!



Current progress: Rudder servo and water dam fitted, shaft straightened and greased, motor mount + motor fitted - ready for battery positioning and re-ballasting.



BTW that motor is 2" diameter Hathaway 28V ballraced, multi-pole motor that is very smooth and quiet - the multiple poles give it a natural gearing - so I will see if it is fast enough on 12V. I think I got it out of an old 1980s printer - many years ago!
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barryfoote

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2009, 12:14:30 PM »

That motor and prop combination will have her aqua planing!!!

A cracking subject for restoration, but how come it was secured to the stand if she was radio controlled?

Barry
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tigertiger

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2009, 12:15:06 PM »

A lovely model.
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Globs

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2009, 02:13:31 PM »

Thanks guys, appreciated.

I test floated it today to find out the best battery position



and tried with the superstructure



The trim is fairly close, just a bit more ballast to pull out and the battery to move back a little. The new NP7 is a heavier battery - the old one was I think a 4.5ah. The motor is completely silent and pulls well on 12V, I need to try it on a bigger stretch of water to see if I need to go to 24V - at which point it may well start planing!!
I think this is a 9 pole motor which means it can go down to 1 rev per 2 seconds easily, and pulls just 11W at 12V when the boat is stopped, reducing as she gets up speed. At 0.9A max current the BS30 speed control never gets warm - even with no water cooling. The torque is extremely high. I get a nice speed and a bow wave though (like in the original boat photo on the Clyde) so I'm hopeful I'll be able to stay with 12V. Run time is estimated at nearly 9 hours!

The stand was stuck as the foam had got sticky and stuck - foam is very variable and this stuff was better than some but worse then others!!

Next tasks then are to create a battery area and start on the super-structure details, change to 40MHz and make up an easy power connector to plumb in the 12V to the superstructure without too much messing about.
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kiteman1

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2009, 07:02:29 PM »

Hi Globs

This looks very much like the 'Flying Drake' kit which was turned out by 'Boats and Models' at Norwich some years ago.  I've forgotten the name of the guy who made the kit but your model looks great to me.

I have a full set of pix of the full size tug which were obtained from Jim Pottinger about fifteen or so years ago..........................
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Globs

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2009, 09:23:14 PM »

Hi Globs

This looks very much like the 'Flying Drake' kit which was turned out by 'Boats and Models' at Norwich some years ago.  I've forgotten the name of the guy who made the kit but your model looks great to me.

I have a full set of pix of the full size tug which were obtained from Jim Pottinger about fifteen or so years ago..........................

I think the Flying Duck and the Flying Drake were built as a pair at the same time (1956), so they would be almost identical!
I'd love to see the pictures of the real boat, is there any chance you have a photo scanner (or live anywhere near Cambridge?).

I've got the top aerials with the top two lights too, it screws into the tripod on the cabin roof, and there is a single light to the rear. I'd be interested in seeing where the other light would have been because I'm sure a tug should have a white then yellow vertical lighting to the rear. I'll be putting Leds into the lights so I can light them up properly.

I also want to dye the front fender and add ropes, and have a bunch of 1:32 tyres over the side - not sure where to get tyres from however!
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kiteman1

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2009, 06:03:27 PM »

Hi Globs

I'll have a squirt round to see if I can find the pix for you.  I'm nowhere near Cambridge,,(Derby) but have a scanner.

As far as 1:32 tyres are concerned you could try phoning Lawrie White at Model Slipway for a set........... :-))
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tolnedra

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2009, 11:26:13 PM »

Globs,

The practice of wearing yellow and white lights to the rear is only fairly recent - at the time of your tug being built, there would only have been a requirement for the normal stern light.

Danny

Ps You might try asking Laurie for some 1/32 figures too.
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tugs46

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2009, 04:58:06 PM »

Looks awesome Globs!

Nice looking hull form 8)

Mike
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KEMO

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2009, 05:31:49 PM »

Hiya,
      Models by design do a set of mouldings for the sister ship Flying Drake,

      http://www.modelsbydesign.co.uk/model_boats.aspx

Keith.
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Globs

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2009, 10:38:43 PM »

Thanks guys

The Flying Drake is the splitting image on the modelsbydesign site so the photos will be very usable.

I'll sort out the tyres via Model Slipway when the lights are a bit further ahead (and the cleaning up!)

Interesting about the nav lights too, I've got a count of 4 white and 1 green + 1 red for these.

I've bought some high power 3mm leds from Maplin (N30AT x 4 + N30BY + N29BY with similar luminosity levels, testing with a white one if I drill the 3mm hole in the base the light floods out of the lens very evenly and looks very good. I'll fit them all and then arrange a dimmer switch to set them to what I want.

Cabin lamps are more difficult - not sure of the internal cabin layout and I really need a floor for the lamps to work, but I have drilled out the wood below the tiny portholes on the top and back so a) they look black in daylight and b) I can gently illuminate from below. The plan is to have a set of lights that I can leave on while it's on show in the house and also use on the water..

I'll try to get some pics of my lamp lighting soon!
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KEMO

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2009, 10:52:01 AM »

Hiya,
      as Kiteman has said the mouldings were produced by 'Boats and Models' a company formally owned by Ivor Broughton. Metcalf Mouldings bought the company and all its rights in 2002, the same mouldings now produced by 'Modelsbydesign'. It's a nice looking tug.

Keith.
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japottinger

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2009, 09:04:57 PM »

Nice to see my photo of Flying Duck in heading, I took a spectacular photo of Flying Dipper
Jim
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japottinger

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Re: Restoring a Flying Duck scratch-built 37" tug
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2009, 09:06:55 PM »

PS why not original colours?
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