Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours  (Read 3004 times)

Popeye

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 277
  • I see no ships!
  • Location: Upminster, Essex, England
Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours
« on: February 02, 2009, 11:00:18 PM »

Was there any rule to determine whether a British Man o' War and/or a fleet supply vessel had a WHITE freeboard band/s or MUSTARD/YELLOW OCHRE as with HMS Victory?

Was there a standard below the waterline colour?

Any ideas appreciated.
Logged
Confusoius he say, 'if all else fails.......reach for the Top-Stop (Red)'.

barryfoote

  • Guest
Re: Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2009, 08:47:39 AM »

The yellow ochre stripes, which was painted with black stripes, was introduced by Nelson at the end of the 18th century. Known as "The Nelson Check", it gave a yellow checked effect to the hull when the gun ports were open.  Colours for ships varied considerably and changed according to what was available. As for below waterline, I think it was around 1750 that coppering came into being. It was not used on all ships as it was expensive. Prior to that, colours varied below waterline, but white was very popular.

I am sure there are others who can fill in the detail better than me though.
Logged

Edward Pinniger

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 531
  • Location: Berkshire, UK
    • Plastic Ship Kit Previews
Re: Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2009, 06:56:29 PM »

Regarding the colour below the waterline, the white colour often seen on non-coppered ships is an anti-fouling mixture named "white stuff", made from tallow and containing (I believe) lead oxide to make it toxic to marine growth. This would be an off-white colour when freshly applied, but probably weathered and discoloured quickly.

Another other anti-fouling compound used in the 18th century (and earlier) was "black stuff", a tar-based mixture.
Logged

farrow

  • Guest
Re: Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2009, 11:16:47 PM »

Is it any good looking at the models at the National Maritime Museum, as I believe there are some builders models of the time on exhibit there.
Logged

Jimmy James

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 988
  • Location: Kings Lynn Norfolk
Re: Royal Navy 18th Century square riggers.... hull colours
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2009, 05:33:41 PM »

Hull colours varied according to how successfully the captain was (How rich) they were normally Dull brick red --Buff yellow , Oiled wood--- or most common tar or Tar varnish Black
 The Gun lines were often only marked by the wales which dependent on the hull colour were normally black and also if the v/l had been Girded ( added thickness of planking near the water line usually painted Black)  But could be painted Buff or Yellow Ocher, Dull red( this was also a popular French colour) White or even Black, some British warships had the quarterdeck bulwarks painted blue  or green --- Confused ---- welcome to the club... standard colour 's didn't really join the Royal Navy until Victorian times, before that it was very much the whim of the Captain or Admiral in command ---how deep their pockets were and what paint was around
Twas the same with the white painted mast tops and yard arm ends ---this was usually a merchant ship thing--- the white lead that made up the bulk of the paint was a very good Anti fungeside and helped prevent rot starting at the end grain of the masts and spars
 White stuff for the underwater hull was usually a mix of china clay - tallow - and white lead and put on in cake form (at least 2 to 3 inches thick) to help prevent worm getting to the wood.
Logged
Retired  Ships Officer/ Master.
Experience: 50+ years at sea under Sail, Steam & Motor
Kings Lynn
Pages: [1]   Go Up