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Author Topic: mooring vessel at work.  (Read 1955 times)

farrow

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mooring vessel at work.
« on: February 03, 2009, 09:13:15 pm »

Hi all I thought a couple of my old vessel the RMAS Salmaid employed on refurbishing a small 4th class mooring at Faslane may interest some modellers interested in adding some weather effects to decks of vessels employed in chain work.
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hama

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2009, 08:12:31 pm »

Hello rmasmaster!
Interesting pictures, do you have any where you can see the whole vessel? Those chains on the deck have very long links, is that common on these moorings?
All the best!
Hama
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farrow

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2009, 08:01:02 pm »

Hi, no the Sal class followed the wild duck class and where twice as big in tonnage, plus stronger working winches(although twice as slow), a 25t swl crane and a powerful 360 degree bow thruster.
The long link chain is known as square link chain and is used for ground work and has a holding power of 1 which is twice the power nearly of any other chain, also it is measured by its thinnest part and is always 20 links to a length of 40 ft.
I will find some better photos and upload them onto this site.
David
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farrow

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2009, 08:53:08 pm »

Hi again.
Sea.mariner I take it you was in the RMAS some time or was you a D606 man, either way when and where was you on it, I may have some more pics of interest to you.
Hama, I have attached some more pics of the class for you, there was only three built, although another 4 super Sals were planned. They built 3 because that was the minimum number estimated to be required to lift a crashed sub in shallow water to allow the crew to escape at max survival depth. The square link chain was picked for mooring work by the Admiralty in the late 19th century after extensive trials to find the best design for holding power on the seabed, but it was heavy and hard on the working craft that were used to lay and recover it. The First mooring class square link chain was 4.5 inch's thick and weighed 4.5t to a 20ft length.
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hama

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2009, 10:22:16 pm »

Wow, thanks for the pictures! I've never seen anything like it. I guess you have built a model of her, or at least someone should. Interesting subject.
Have a nice weekend!
Hama.
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SteamboatPhil

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2009, 10:41:33 pm »

I have to say if I was ever to build a scale model, that would be it, very different, love it  :-))
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dave301bounty

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2009, 04:40:10 pm »

The size of them flukes on the stern anchor  ,tells you she was built for Hard work ,all that chain work coupled up to the  mooring type anchors sugests the naval achitect involved had a specific design,,fantastic phot,s though .Well posted.
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KEMO

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 07:09:26 pm »

Hiya,
      I have just purchased a back issue of MMI June 1996 as I wanted the feature on the Dog Class tugs, but also there is an article on a scratch build of the RMAS Salmaid.

Keith.
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Shipmate60

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 08:28:38 pm »

If anyone wants any info on the ex RMAS Vessels give me a shout.
Right now I am on ex RMAS Newton and have been the Chief Engineer of both classes mentioned.

Bob
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farrow

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Re: mooring vessel at work.
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2009, 11:02:03 pm »

Yes they are an interesting class of work vessel and where employed by the Admiralty on a very wide field of work other than the salvage/mooring work that they where designed for. They carried six fold blocks below which you connected to the working winches forward to lift over the bow (2 x sets of tackles), the winches where 35t swl, reduced later to 25t because of the physical strain of man handling the working mains and shackles etc. Had a fixed 180t per hour salvage pump, plus in the hold numerous air, water pumps and welding equipment. Had high and low air pressure systems to operate various systems, such as air lift pumps, pneumatic tools and support divers including a compression chamber for divers. This precludes numerous lengths of different size chain, shackles, blocks, wires, so as to be able to carry out refurbishment to moorings and carry out salvage tasks. The original spec demanded 12 knots speed in most weather, although they where very good seaboats, I would not push them at that speed in bad weather, though a mate of mine pushed the Salmaster through a SE 8 to 9 in the Pentland Firth ( he was 12 hours late on his eta for Rosyth). But yes I had 4 interesting years on these craft and I enjoyed them.
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