Model Boat Mayhem

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Author Topic: park flyers  (Read 3071 times)

DARLEK1

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2009, 12:33:54 AM »

I was just trying to say a little bit of training would be good, never mind the real thing compared to a model aspect, why do some people just take every chance they can get to have a go?
 I know what I can do, does anyone else really know?

 Paul... {-)
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sheerline

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2009, 07:17:31 AM »

Hi Darlek, that broken aeroplane is just the sort of model one needs when learning.... but in one piece of course! Apart from a healthy and reliable motor ( very important if you wish to keep away from the planets surface) it was apparently easy to work out what the controls were doing whilst flying away from you but when flying head on, you have to think which way to move the sticks.
When I started flying I was offered help by a very accomplished flyer who gave me two extremely helpful bits of advice and after a couple of half hour lessons I was flying solo.

1:-   engine at full bore and get some good altitude straight away ( height will allow for some errors) then chop the throttle back and reduce speed a bit to remove twitchiness of the aircraft.
2:-  When the model is turned towards you, at some point it will wander in one direction or other or drop a wing so, push your rudder (or aileron if 4ch) stick towards the dropped wing or direction of turn as if you were using it as an imaginary prop to support it.

These two bits of info alone were the key to survival of my model and I went flying all summer with that aeroplane and it always came home in one piece . Once you have mastered it and flown for a while, you don't actually have to think which way to push the sticks as it just becomes second nature and like riding a bike, you don't forget either.  :-))
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chrise

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2009, 09:10:27 AM »

Sheerline,

You were very lucky. Knowing what to do & actually doing it in the moment of crisis are not the same thing.

It is perfectly true that most beginners fancy a Spitfire - although a jet is catching up fast now - & it is totally the wrong plane to fly as a beginner when stability is a great help & speed something to avoid at all costs - you just arrive at the scene of the accident quicker & the damage is then much more impressive - and dangerous. Generally the less help you have the more stable the model needs to be and the slower it is the more time you have to think & the less damage will result. Also when first learning avoid any sort of wind.

Grasshopper

I wouldn't worry. Whilst real & model look similar there are many differences. If you wanted to transfer from a Piper to a Boeing you would expect a lengthy conversion course so why expect to transfer from full size to a model without any help? I taught an ex Hunter squadron leader - at the time a senior air traffic controller -  to fly models & he was one of my best learners. Whilst he needed help he understood the principles & was very disciplined which made him a quick learner.
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The long Build

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2009, 01:14:34 PM »

.... but in one piece of course!
   <:( <:(
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chrise

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2009, 01:22:45 PM »

That gold Futaba looks very 80's & wasn't cheap. It is very offputting to start with crashes. All model aircraft are expendable - if you can't accept that then don't fly - but it does hurt.

Try again with help it is great fun.
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sheerline

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2009, 02:01:36 PM »

As an additional bit of info, my third model aircraft was a quarter scale Auster, I flew it 3ch using rudder and a bit of diherdral. Talk about a stable model, it was fantastically stable. I used to put the tx on the ground whilst I rolled a fag and watch it gently circle the field on half throttle. It had 13 sq ft of wing area and weighed in at 13 lbs... 1lb/sq ft wing loading! I flew it for three years until a bracket gave out on a wing strut. The crash was very unspectacular in that it looked firghtening as it descended ,spiralling out of the sky, but it did it fairly gently and and gave me loads of time to shut the motor down and warn a couple of people nearby. It  only smashed the nose off but it never did get repaired. It was a really good flyer and loads of beginners had a go at it and were surprised how slow and docile it was....and easy to fly!
Bigger the better in my book but you do need a good flying area .
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chrise

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2009, 02:58:25 PM »

Size is a mixed blessing as with size goes weight & cost. Weight, or mass, is the difference between a model that bounces & one which demolishes itself. Having said that a stable big model is so precictable & relaxing to fly.

The traditional 55" 40 powered model flying club trainer was not an accident but the result of experience.

Nowadays my decision would be totally the result of the help that I expected to get. If you are going to get real support - like in a club - then I would go 4 channel & not totally stable as a very good learning experience but if I was on my own then you basically need to start with a model that is very light & flies itself until you mess it up. Learn to fly on calm days with plenty of height that gives the model time to sort itself out if you just let go of the controls. I would not recommend this route but if needs must....

Finally decide what you want the aircraft to do & make it do it. Far too many fliers respond to what the model has done.
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das boot

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Re: park flyers
« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2009, 07:04:41 PM »

Go for lessons from a proper instructor...I can't fly a 'plane to save my life, but I can fly a chopper(ish). I took a course of lessons from a BRCHA(as it was then)qualified instructor, who just happened to live close to me. He started off by practically rebuilding my Hughes 500, telling me where I'd gone wrong and showing me how to correct it...then the flying started. It took me ages to learn that the direction that the heli was facing wasn't necessarily the direction in which it was flying....once that had sunk in, I was away.

I only ever broke one piece, landed on a sharp 'something' and burst a float.

It cost me a fair few bob to learn properly, but it saved me an awful lot more in repairs.

Rich
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