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Author Topic: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203  (Read 80268 times)

Greggy1964

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Re: Planking Master Hand's hull
« Reply #125 on: February 07, 2011, 07:20:18 PM »

There are a lot of things buzzing around in my head regarding Master Hands hull planking at the moment.

From studying E.J.M.'s Sailing Trawler book I have found Master Hand has 21 strakes of planking on each side of the keel.

The top 4 planks or sheer strakes are 6" wide and 3" thick, the bilge strakes are also 3" thick, at 1/16th scale and converting to millimeters, these measurements equate to 9.5mm x 4.8mm and 4.8mm respectively.

The 4 sheer planks carry their 6" width right to the bow and from amidships to the stern but having no evidence to the contrary I'm going to thin the width of these planks from 6" to 2 1/2" as they approach the edge of the first of the transverse transom planks to which their hood ends butt up against.

From my research, this is how this tight turn at the stern was negotiated.

The guard board plank and the 2nd plank will also carry their width all the way to the bow, what this does is lift the run of all subsequent planking up the stem giving them a nice upward sweep.

If this is not done the ends of the planks at the bow take on a downward sweep which looks just awful.

I will describe this procedure as we go along which will make things a little clearer

Once all these planks are in place port and starboard I can then mark off the width of the remaining 15 planks per side. This will be done by fitting strips of cardboard to the remaining exposed edge faces of each frame and dividing it by 15 to get the width of each plank at each station.

Things are not set in stone at this point as I will be looking for a nice sweep and run through to the plank seams from bow to stern and I will widen a plank here and narrow one there to achieve this.

I will be detailing each step of the planking process and how I approach it as we go along with lots of photos, the idea being to take some of the mystique out of planking a hull in a scale manner :-))

But for now I have laid the first plank (how exciting!  :-)) ) which is the lowest transverse transom plank. This measures 12" x 2 1/2" (19.05mm by 3.9mm at 1/16th scale).

Because I have so much framing to nail to in this area I had no problem fixing it in place using 1/2" steel dressmakers pins.

I use the soft variety as they bend if wrongly hit with the hammer rather than snapping off as when using hardened pins, which would be impossible to remove. I could of course use brass pins but its an expense I don't need and besides the real ships planks were held in place by galvanised steel bolts which were countersunk and the heads stopped with cement and varnish. So the odd rust streak on my models hull wont be out of place  ;)

To get my first plank to bend to that tight curve across the stern I boiled it alive in a shallow baking tray of water over the hobs on my stove for 15 minutes. {-)



I was extremely hot when lifted out but very pliable



It was clamped at both ends with those cute little Rolson quick clamps of which I have quite a large heap (you can never have too many clamps of all sizes and shapes in my book! :-)) O0 )



As you can see it has taken up that nice sweet curve I worked so hard to create :-))

I have nailed it down (no glue yet) at each of my horn frames by two pins in each and three pins in each of the quarter timbers and are more than enough to hold it in place.

In my keenness to avoid burning my fingers and in a rush to get the plank on before it decided it ought to be straight and not curved  {-) I neglected to put pads under the heads of the pins!

The grand plan was to pin the plank in place till it set and then remove it and glue and pin it in place but in my excitement I nailed it flush! >>:-( so its going to be fun extracting the pins later with out damaging the plank surface! >>:-(

We shall have to see %)

It went on soggy and hot but as it cooled down the plank dried out completely which surprised me :o

I will be making a steam box out of 3/8th plywood to which I will be attaching either a wall paper stripper or I could use a kettle element I rescued from an old leaking kettle and fix it into a big aluminium pan I have.

The lid of the pan is a loose fit so I shouldn't have any pressure problems and I will be fitting a hose near the top edge of the pan to carry steam to my steam box.

It's all some what of an experiment I have in mind if my request to borrow my Mums steam wall paper stripper doesn't go down too well! {-) {-)

I shall of course be chronicling the steam box adventure also :}

Each mirrored pair of hull planks will be cut, steamed and fitted to the hull simultaiously to ensure symmetry. When I cut the planks originally I left them slightly thicker than the scale 3.9mm, this will allow me room to scrape and sand the completed hull surface smooth and clean without reducing the scale plank thinckness.
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dreadnought72

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Re: Planking Master Hand's hull
« Reply #126 on: February 07, 2011, 09:45:17 PM »

I will be making a steam box out of 3/8th plywood to which I will be attaching either a wall paper stripper or I could use a kettle element I rescued from an old leaking kettle and fix it into a big aluminium pan I have.

Plenty of the "big" boat builders - if the wooden boat forum is anything to go by - are using large diameter plastic pipe for steaming real timbers. Therefore you might find smaller diameter plastic pipe (offcuts from a plumber?) a better solution for steaming things in, rather than a wooden box?

Just a thought!

Looking forward to the planking, very much.

Andy, planking, quietly - yet quickly - at this end of the UK.  :-))
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Hammer

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #127 on: February 07, 2011, 09:47:07 PM »

No problem Greggy, I will enjoy watching your endevers.Geoff.R.G.Y.
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derekwarner

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #128 on: February 08, 2011, 03:01:02 AM »

Greggy1964....just realised...this posting member called "Hammer" is actually a very well known member on Paddleducks.......& has a great sence of humor  {-) {-) & building skills  O0

Welcome RGY.... %% Geoff  :P .....Derek

Oh & BTW...here is my variation on the steaming concept...a one litre S/S jug with a loose fit shim brass cap & room for one plank only ....works OK ... O0
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Hammer

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #129 on: February 08, 2011, 04:04:05 PM »

Yes thats me Derek. I forgot I am the HAMMER on this site. GEOFF
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #130 on: February 08, 2011, 04:15:38 PM »

I was pondering how to best shave plank edges nice and true over the weekend while wandering in town like you do . . . . . and I found myself in one of the cheapy shops that have appeared in every town like a blot on the landscape . . . . . . .

But I found myself drawn to the tool section, and like every modeller I was casually looking for gadjets and tools that might help me in my boat building quest. O0

And look what I found!



These little (well tiny really) bench vices  :-))

They are made of aluminium and the jaws are 40mm wide and the vice can hold an object up to 35mm thick maximum. They can clamp to a bench surface of up to 20mm thick.

Now on their own, they are about as useful as a chocolate kettle   >>:-({-)

You see singly you can't put any force behind filing or sawing because the chuffing vice dances and shimmies about,

. . . . . . . . . . but thinking laterally for a moment . . . . . . . . .

When two or more, (the more the better) are used in tandem, everything is solid because the vices (whats' the term for a group of vices? a flock? {-) %) ) use the material being worked on as lateral support and everything is as solid as a rock for working.

And using bigger G clamps to grip the board the vices are clamped to to fix them to a more solid surface. . . . . .



In banks of two or more vices together . . . .

They come into their own! :-))

Perfect for shaving planking stock to the desired edge curve! :-))

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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #131 on: February 08, 2011, 06:04:46 PM »

Hello Derek,

I've had a peek at PaddleDucks and it looks interesting so I've signed up :-))

Look what else I found in the cheapy shop!



I can drill around corners now! {-)



 :-))
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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #132 on: February 08, 2011, 06:38:41 PM »

Is that the old Woolies Greggy

Ned
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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #133 on: February 08, 2011, 08:22:35 PM »

Posts Moved.
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #134 on: February 08, 2011, 08:26:11 PM »

Hello Ned,

The very same :-))
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dreadnought72

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #135 on: February 09, 2011, 12:06:09 PM »

whats' the term for a group of vices? a flock? {-) %)

<thinks laterally>

Got to be a vice squad, surely?  ;)

Andy
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #136 on: February 09, 2011, 03:31:21 PM »

 {-) {-) {-)Heee {-) {-) O0 O0

Yes of course! :-))

Thank you Dreadnought
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Hammer

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #137 on: February 09, 2011, 05:20:12 PM »

Greggy. Have a look at Duke of Devonshire, Paddleducks - forum - construction. There you will fined my latest model, the boiler & engine are on forum- steam - boilers. That is if you have the time with all your great work on Master Hand. Geoff
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #138 on: February 09, 2011, 08:42:53 PM »

Right!

I know what you lot are thinking!

He's started planking and he ain't even faired the frames yet!

Well not exactly! If you look back at posts 66 & 67 I found the bevels for each frame from the scale drawing I'd drawn up and cut them before erecting them on the building board, so they are nearly there anyway.

What I do at this stage is wrap 5mm x 5mm pine battens around the hull to fine tune things.



Check out my expensive abrasive tools? {-) The flexible sandy thingy far right spans three frames and has tape over its ends as we only want to work on the centre frame





Springing battens around the hull high lights any irregularities



Take one chisel pointed marker and ruin it by dawbing the frame edges taking care to brush the surface lightly as we don't want the colour to soak into the wood, just colour the surface. You could of course use coloured chalk.

Using the sanding tools, sand away at the frame edges, all the while checking with your battens.

You should only be tickling things here, no heavy stuff.

We don't want to remove any material from the edge of the frame demarking the hull shape, just take off the bevel caused by the thickness of the frames and the marker pen on the frame edges will help with this.

But if you get too enthusiastic as I did here . . . .  >>:-(



Its no big panic! :o

You did keep the cardboard half frame patterns that the frames were cut to didn't you?  %) These will show low points and springing battens in the area you are working on will blatantly show if you've gone too low as your battens will stand off the low frame while laying snugly against all fair frames!

If you have gone too low, simply glue a shim to the edge of the low frame and give it another go but with less grunt this time! {-)



Purists would draw back in horror and replace the entire frame!

Me? I want to get this thing on the water some day  %)



The two battens in the top of the above photo mark the upper seams of the guardboard and 2nd planks and the lower one marks the bottom edge of the four sheer strake planks.

There are 15 planks between these and once you're happy that all frames are fair, make quick cardboard templates of the completed frame edges and shape the edges of the opposing frames on the other side of the keel to match, we do want a symmetrical hull after all :-))

Now the boring bit, make strips of cardboard to the same width of the frames. Carefully cut one for each frame so that its ends just touch the lower edge of the sheer strake batten and the upper edge of plank two. Now measure carefully and using a calculator dived the measurement by 15 and plot the newly found plank widths on the strip and transfer these measurements to its frame.

Of course the planks will narrow towards the bow, and for now we are aiming for all the 15 planks to narrow evenly. In an ideal world this is how the planks will be cut but sometimes some planks will be narrower, and others wider to gain a pleasing effect.



Master Hand has the type of hull with a deep heel and the planks will get wider towards the stern, we will aim to gain this extra space by widening all the planks from plank two up the side of the stern post to where it disappears into the hull at the rudder trunk. At this stage I think plank 6 will be final plank at the top of the stern post and plank 7 will be the one that spans the side of stern post immediately before the rudder trunk.



Planks 8 & 9 will run into the back of the rudder trunk and planks 10 to 15 will meet on the first transitional plank under the counter at the stern and there will be two short infill planks covering the little triangular area between the rudder trunk and the first transitional plank.

This is the grand plan. . . . . .

But first I want to lay the guard boards and the 2nd planks and to set out on the frames the widths of the remaining planks, and using battens again at each seam see how they will look before cutting more planking stock.

I'm in two minds wether or not to make pine planks to the correct thickness and cut them as if I were fitting them permanently to the hull and then using them as templates to cut from the oak I intend to use for planking.

I have a limited oak planking stock so I want to avoid mistakes and so wasted this valuable resource :-))





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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #139 on: February 09, 2011, 09:30:46 PM »

Here is a photo of Master Hand on launch day......



The more astute of you will realise there are 25 planks in my plank plot drawings in my last post.

I originally took E.J.M's description of her planking to mean 21 planks plus the sheer strake (4 planks total), but now after studying the photo above he meant 21 planks in all. :-)

If you squint and stare for about 2 hours  :o at the above photo you can just make out the first 14 plank seams from the deck edge down the face of the stem, the 14th plank seam is at the point where the stem goes from vertical and turns towards the keel s :-))

Going on the visible plank widths there are only 7 more planks to the keel below.

This will mean that on the real ship the planks were 9" wide at the midship section, 14.2mm wide on the model.

I will be planking to the latter idea
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #140 on: February 09, 2011, 09:59:05 PM »

Hello Hammer erm . . . . .  Geoff

I did look at the Duke, she's an impressive model.

I love the idea of using the handle of a milk carton for the ventilators :-))

A modeller after me own heart! {-)

I love those long slim hulls with the fine bows and shapely sterns.

Might have to build me a paddler one day O0
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #141 on: February 10, 2011, 04:07:20 PM »

I've got 42 planks to cut and shape %) so I might as well be comfortable while I'm doing it!



There's nothing worse than trying to shape a long wobbly plank if its not fixed rigid . . . . . . . . . . . so I've dreamed up the ACME multi vice plank clamp.



The base is made from two scrap pieces if timber forming a 'T' section beam for stiffness with short appendages to allow me to clamp the beam to any convenient surface, but which can be removed in 2 minutes flat.

I have 4 aluminium mini vices clamped to the beam.

I broke one vice's clamp bracket by giving it too much grunt! <*< so I cut recesses in the webs using a countersunk bit and screwed the thing down <*<

And the reason I was giving it grunt was that I couldn't stabilze it to allow me to work on anything clamped in it as the vice kept simmying about! >>:-(



On closer study the vice had a casting flanges and filing these away solved the problem :-))

Now I have a new toy to shape planks of any size and they are held solid while planing the edges to shape, and I can work on 4 feet of plank at any one time.



Curved planks are accommodated by moving one or more of the three loose clamps closer to the fixed one depending on the tightness of the curve being worked on.

 {-) Patent Pending!  <*< {-)

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Hammer

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #142 on: February 10, 2011, 04:28:02 PM »

Greggy, I don't dare to tell you anything as you are doing a brilliant job. But there is always a but I have found it is a good idea to plan the control runs before to many planks are laid. Something that's ease to forget in all the excitement. Geoff
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #143 on: February 10, 2011, 05:28:43 PM »

Hi Geoff,

I'm not so foolish or presumptuous as to claim to know everything   :P and I welcome ideas and advice, and the input of other experienced builders. O0

The point of my build log here is to give those wishing to build a scratch built model to scale a chance to see how I do it and hopefully demystify the processes involved.

We all have our particular ways of doing things but if it can be shown that there are quicker or easier ways of doing something I'm all for it :-))

That said, my plan of champagne is as follows.

Fair the frames on one side of the hull using battens and bevel the frame edges so that same lay flush with an even curve in all three dimensions.

I've already fixed the run of the guard board and 2nd plank plus the bottom edge of the four sheer strakes.

Next is to divide the remaining frame edges by 15 and using strips of card laid on the frame edges, I'll accurately gauge the space required to be divided up.

I take the card and lay it flat and using a calculator plot the plank widths on the card strip, i.e. at station 8 the frame edge between plank 2 and the sheer plank is 200mm which divided by 15 gives 13.3mm plank widths. These I then transfer from the card strip and plot them on the frame edge at Stn. 8

When I've done this at all frames I'll pick out plank seams 3,6,9,12 &15 on each frame counting from the keel and spring 5 No. 5mm x 5mm battens around the hull at these points. The idea being to get a feel for how the planks will lay.

The battens will show me if planks will be happy at these positions, if they are not they will show me where they'd prefer to be and I'll move them up or down the frames to suit.

When I'm happy with the lay of these 5 battens I will score the frames fixing these plank seams.

Then I will divide up the space between these marks by 3 to find the plank seams between.

Again I'll run battens at theses points just to make sure the plotted plank seams are fair before scoring their positions on the frames.

Towards the stern from station 12 I let each of the 5 battens run out towards the transitional plank I have already installed under the counter. E.J.M. has given a clue as to how the planks run out up the side of the stern post as he measured the plank seams at this point in his survey of Master Hand's hull.

Once I've done all this to one side of the hull I will repeat the process on the other side of the keel using the first side as a pattern.

Only at this point will I be cutting any planks, and I will cut and fit one plank to the starboard side and then use it as a pattern to mirror its opposite number on the port side.

Then I will fit these two planks as pairs permanently to the hull before going on the the next adjacent pair of planks.

To find the shape of the next pair of planks I will use the edges of the newly fixed planks to find their mating edge on the new plank and its upper edge will be found from its corresponding score mark at each frame.

The plank blank is laid flat and a batten sprung around the plotted points and drawn in and then the plank is cut out wide of the newly marked plank edges.

Then comes the process of try fitting and finely shaping the plank edge to mate with its fixed neighbour on the hull.

I will of course detail all these steps with lots of photos to come :-))
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #144 on: February 11, 2011, 01:30:16 AM »

Here's what I've got so far :-))

I've laid battens around the hull de-marking the top edge of the guard board, plank 2, plank 3,6,9,12 & 15 plus the bottom edge of the sheer strake planks.

Some photos from different angles













I've also plotted the top edge of plank 7 as well because this one runs into the top of the stern post at the rudder trunk.



Plank 8's lower edge will run into the rabbet that cuts across the top of the stern post and the hood end of this plank will run into the forward face of the rudder trunk. O0

All the battens lie snugly against the frames so my bevels are good, but I will spend a day or two staring at the hull from different angles and tweak a batten here and there until I'm happy O0

Doing this, I find I can get clear in my head how the planks will look and I can forsee any difficulties when it comes to cutting planks.

Laying battens on the hull at scale plank thickness has another advantage O0 , I can lay tracing paper over the battens and get an idea of the true plank shapes by tracing the outside face of the plank at it's edge de-marked by the battens. I can transfer the plank widths at each station finding the other plank edge.

Spring a batten around the points and hey presto ! {-) the true plank shape :-))

This little exercise highlights a dilemma >>:-(



This is a plot of plank 12 at the bilge area from the stem to just forward of midship section at station 10.  :(( I have transferred the tracing to cardboard and offered it up to my plank stock {:-{

My planking stock is 20 mm wide and as you can see, this plank has quite a curve to it.

I have two options that I can see.

Option 1 Cut each plank as if it were straight, steam it to death and force it to 'edge set' to take up the curve as I lay the plank on the hull.

Option 2 Make the plank in sections with butts at the frame positions. Doing this I can get this particular plank starting at the stem up to station 6 out of my 20mm wide stock and the plank run will be made up of four or five pieces

I think I prefer option 1 at the moment.

I will need to do some experimenting O0

      
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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #145 on: February 11, 2011, 05:00:43 AM »

I could be wrong Greg.... :D......but I think you may have been a shipwright in a previous life....... O0 O0

What do you think RGY ??????? .....Derek ;D
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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #146 on: February 11, 2011, 08:41:22 AM »

I have two options that I can see.

Steaming ought work well for your size of plank dimensions.

Butt joins (for short planks) are likely in the original, with a backing piece to provide support.

But there is an option 3:

Scarph the planks to make a longer/bigger plank. Plane an angle to the edges/ends of your two pieces of wood and epoxy glue them together. Use this stock as a big plank.

Andy
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Greggy1964

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #147 on: February 11, 2011, 01:26:07 PM »

Thanks for your coments fellas :-)) :embarrassed:

We aim to please O0
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Greggy1964

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Re: Master Hand LT1203 Scale Planking Made Easy
« Reply #148 on: February 11, 2011, 03:36:25 PM »

Using the batten method to find the true plank shapes is easy as I described earlier.

I'll use plank No. 12 as before for this demonstration as it is one of the most curved being near the bilges of the hull ;)

I laid a strip of thick tracing paper (plastic draughting film is even easier to use if you can get hold of it) ensuring it laid on the batten flat and true.



Cut the strip wide and roughly to the curve of the plank. If you fail to do this you will find the batten you're tracing will run off the edges of the tracing paper.



Trace the edge of the plank batten using dots every 1/2" or so onto the tracing paper plus accurately mark the stations behind as these will be transferred to the cardboard template and consequently to the planking stock. It will give you accurate locator's when offering the plank to the hull, especially if your like me and having to concider making an entire plank out of four or five separate pieces. :-))  



Take your plank batten tracing and lay it flat and smooth (this is important) on a convenient flat wood board.



Using pins at the pencil marks you made, pin the tracing paper to the board smoothing it out (but not stretching it) as you go.



Spring a straight grained 5mm x 5mm section batten around the pins and hold it against them with pins placed on the opposite side of the batten. Now join up the pencil dots to make a curve. This will be the top edge of our new plank.



A nice curve should result, though sometimes it can be a lazy 'S' shape but don't worry, just follow the dots :-)) and don't forget the positions of the frames you marked off on the tracing paper numbered frame by frame of course! O0

Now go back to the hull and take your trusty vernier calipers and transfer the correct plank widths you plotted on each frame edge onto the tracing at their correct station.

And spring your 5x5 batten around pins set in these points.



You should end up with something like this . . . .



Now using a pin or pricker (I buzzed one up in a drill using 3" of half inch round dowel with a dressmakers pin superglued into the end), you're going to be doing this pricking game for every plank template so you might as well make a tool for the job :-))

Prick through the tracing to a cardboard blank you've made taking care everything is smooth and flat again and don't forget the stations.



Now simply join up the dots by either springing the trusty batten round pins or if you're lazy like me play dot to dot game with a short ruler and pencil joining up three or four successive dots at at time (it still comes out as a smooth curve - weired I know! {-) )



Now carefully cut out the plank template  . . . .



And offer up in place on the hull . . .  ( the dog does move honest! he's just lazy and delights in tripping me up! O0 {-) {-) )



If you've followed these steps carefully and with due diligence you will have a perfect plank pattern that will lay exactly where you plank is going to go, no fuss no fighting.



It just looks like it was there forever! O0 :-))

Now grab some planking stock, trace off your plank pattern onto plank stock, cut her out and nail her home :-))

The beauty of this method is accurate planks that will naturally form to the hull at their designated position and you may only need light steaming or no steaming  all, they will just lay down like a lazy cat basking in the sun :-)

Talking of sun, a word of warning!

Tracing paper and cardboard move with temperature and humidity, so the steps above should be done complete for one plank per session (of course you'll make the mirrored opposite plank at the same time) to the point of tracing onto plank material.

Don't expect to come to a cardboard template in two weeks time and expect it to fit the hull exactly unless you live in the Nevada Desert or somewhere like that! :((

Once you've done this process a few times it becomes a no brainer exercise that you find yourself doing automatically - just work slowly and methodically through all (21 in my case) plank patterns.

If nothing else you'll be able to bore your pool side mates rigid with your account of planking your pride and joy using traditional fullsize boat building methods! {-) {-)

An excellent way to get the water to yourself heee :-)) %)
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Hammer

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Re: 3/4" to the foot model of Lowestoft Sailing Trawler Master Hand LT1203
« Reply #149 on: February 11, 2011, 07:56:00 PM »

I agree Derek, Greggy must have the shipwright gene.
Greggy, your problem of the sharper curve making the cut plank to wide. Use shorter planks solves that one. In my experience looking at old boats, there are a lot of misconceptions among modelers. The deck is the classic nice wood with neat pitch joints and staggered uniform lengths of planks. Working boats had painted decks more often than not, as the crew had little time for the holy stone. The shipbuilders used there timber as economically as possible. (As you have mentioned.) With plenty of frames to maintain 3 plank spacing of joints. A few years ago in the Bag at Salcombe (the harbour up past the town) Someone was repairing the           Maria Assumpta, cutting out the planking and repairing with pieces about 18" long. On a pilot cutter I saw a noggin between two frames to carry a deck joint.  End joints on planks would not have wide joints like the side, unlike imitation wooden decks on moder liners. But don't look at mine.Geoff
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