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Author Topic: Brush Vs Air  (Read 2980 times)

swampbug

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Brush Vs Air
« on: September 12, 2009, 05:52:58 AM »

 {:-{
Hi Guys

Im thinking about maybe getting a spray gun, but think about the pro's and con's?

I have just about finished my Andrea Gail and this was brush painted, my next project is the Happy Hunter.

What do you think, spray looks good, and quicker, but more to clean, messy to spray?

Never used a spray gun on models, not sure what to do.

Hmmmm Dilemma 
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2009, 09:07:51 AM »

The mess is a consideration as is the initail outlay of equipment.  I, along with a lot of fellow modellers, take the easier way out and use a lot of purchased spray tins such as the acrylic range of products available from automotive sellers like Halfords.  These are very convenient and easy to use and give a superb finish if the model is correctly prepared and I know of a lot of navy models that are painted with Halfords grey primer above the waterline and red primer below it.

I always spray outdoors though so weather comes into it as well but it does enable a quick easy path to a good finish with the minimum of cost and effort.
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swampbug

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2009, 10:48:53 AM »

Oh yes never thought of that way, does sound a very good way.
Guess i would have to go carfull applying different paints on top?
Would they react?
 {:-{
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2009, 11:25:57 AM »

There is always a danger when mixing acrylics and oil based paints and whereas there are one or two tried and tested guidelines there are always different reactions with different manufacturers paints.

I would always recommend when mixing paint combinations that you spray a test piece and see if it remains stable before trying it on your model.  Generally oil based paints go on top of acrylics OK but the challenges can come when you try to put acrylics on top of oil based paints.   There are many posts both on here and other forums that state what you can and cannot do but I would still maintain that testing is the best path to guarranteed finishes.

There are a lot of other members on here who have more experience with paint combinations who I'm sure will be happy to give some further guidance.
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swampbug

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2009, 01:35:39 PM »

Thanx for that its opened up a new doorway for me to try

Does sound a better option  :-))
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HS93 (RIP)

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2009, 02:33:03 PM »

there is a motor factor local to me that will mix paint to any colour you want and stuff it in a aerosol can, they also do small touch up pots of the same paint, I hate painting and try not to do it as much as passable but I got to the point where I had a few boats finished all bar the paint again, aerosols are great BUT not for small items as they can remove all the detail so after several attempts I have started using a air brush, its also good for getting in corners that big cans would miss and if you use the small touch up pots it will match the cans, but I have finally realised that painting is not something you do in a hurry and a last min job it has to be planned to get it half way decent and takes a lot of practice, and I need plenty of that by the looks of things.
 
well thats what I have found.

Peter
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Bryan Young

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2009, 05:31:21 PM »

A few years ago I bought a re-con compressor to both pumping up car and trailer tyres and also power an airbrush. Setting the thing up was a pain in the butt. OK for tyres. OK for airbrushing as well.....but having to clean out the airbrush with thinners started to get more expensive than just buying an aerosol. As has been said, no waste, no mess and a decent result. BY.
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hollowhornbear

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2009, 06:39:33 PM »

i use tamiya acrylics in my airbrush water based so easy clean up, but still can take longer to clean than it does to spray, I  also use plasticote and halfords spray cans.
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Damien

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2009, 03:12:58 AM »

I purchased a small diaphragm type compressor and a Badger 200 airbrush in 1973 and still have them, would never brush paint anything other than fittings now, i have upgraded over the years to a a tank compressor and passche double action airbrush (i've had it 7yrs and still not had paint in it i prefer the Badger single action) a touch up gun and a 2L Arnold Devilbiss gun i used for the finish on my sport sedan race car.
For models i use Enamels or Auto acrylic paints only, the difference in finish between them is Enamel wll dry with a gloss unless satin or matt is bought, Auto acrylic will dry semi gloss and a clear top coat will be needed for a High gloss finish.
Thinners are expensive only if purchased at hardware stores most specialist Auto paint shops will refill your metal cans for 1/3 of the cost of the original purchase of the full can. (at least here in Melbourne Aust.) They also have left over tins and odments that customers never collected and of course will mix to order.
Another good source is  Auto panel shops they often have part tins cheaply, perfect for 1 off small jobs if scale colours are not needed.
The clean up time is well worth the finish obtained IMHO.

Damien.
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andygh

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2009, 01:05:38 PM »

Quote
there is a motor factor local to me that will mix paint to any colour you want and stuff it in a aerosol can, they also do small touch up pots of the same paint

Can you give us an idea of what that costs Peter? Sounds good
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HS93 (RIP)

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2009, 07:02:08 PM »


I noticed he even sells on ebay, but he does mail order, they will put ant type or colour paint in. there are other people who do it you may find one local to you.

Peter


http://www.auto-paint.co.uk/carpaint/

http://www.auto-paint.co.uk/carpaint/index.php?act=viewCat&catId=14

http://www.auto-paint.co.uk/carpaint/index.php?act=viewCat&catId=6
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swampbug

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2009, 02:32:15 AM »

Thanx guys ive got the idea now, and like the idea of using spray cans with touch up paint too

 :-))
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CGAux26

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2009, 03:39:06 AM »

As to the mess potentially created with spray paint, you can make a simple spray booth from a large cardboard box, a box fan, and a furnace air filter.  Cut a hole in the back of the box to fit the filter (I use a 20 by 20 inch filter) and tape it on the outside of the box.  Then you can change it when it loads up with paint.  Fasten the box fan snugly against the filter and turn it on HIGH before painting.  I have sprayed red paint indoors in my garage with no overspray getting past the filter.  I move my cars out, just in case.

I would have attached photos of my booth, but the site is telling me the max. size for attachments is only 191 KB or some such nonsense.
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Bunkerbarge

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Re: Brush Vs Air
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2009, 09:42:15 AM »

Firstly I must state quite clearly:

Views and opinions expressed by members do not necessarily reflect the views of Model Boat Mayhem or the site owner.


As has been discussed many times in the past both on here and elsewhere, the manufacture of home built spray booths must only be undertaken with a great deal of care and a meticulous attention to safety.

Any fan must be of an intrinsically safe design to prevent arcing at the brushes being able to ignite the paint fumes passing through it.  Do not under any circumstances use a normal circulating fan for such a project.  The potential dangers of these items cannot be over stated and great care must always be taken with the design of them. 

If in doubt consult an expert but better still, purchase a purpose built booth.  I know they are expensive but hey are built for the job and include the proper type of filters that not only extract the paint particles but they also significantly reduce the volatile components of the solvents.  These filters actually have a shelf life and are the only ones that should be used for these units.  I have just ordered one myself and although three hundred pounds I consider it money well spent and a small amount to pay for the piece of mind that comes from knowing the booth I have is going to keep me and my house safe.
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