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Author Topic: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape  (Read 2838 times)

andrewh

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Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« on: August 27, 2009, 01:09:45 PM »

I had a day out visiting Pinmill in Suffolk, I had heard (and seen  on Google maps ) that it is hotbed of old boating activity

The Saturday I went was most fortunate - there was a regatta -presumably of historic sailing craft in Ipswich the following day so I was able to sit on the shore and watch a succession of beautiful tree-wood craft heading up to Ipswich.  Most were gaff-rigged and many also had tan sails - perfect

anyway I took some pics - they are all in photobucket (open album) at
http://s222.photobucket.com/albums/dd159/andrewh_photo/Holidays/Pinmill%20aug09/
Feel free to have a guddle


This appears to be a "pot" rigged as aThames barge - I have not researched her yet, but on that Saturday I could not remember the translation of "Betula"  Now I remember that it is (of course) the latin for Birch :}


This appears to be new - a Gaff rigged smack called Gladys.  I suspect she is a Thames Bawley

Thames Barges


This one won't come back, i fear
andrew

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dreadnought72

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2009, 02:48:31 PM »

Thanks for those - great stuff.

I've known of Pinmill for a third of a century, but never had the opportunity to go there; though I got a taste for Thames Barges in Maldon many years ago.

Andy

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andrewh

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2009, 05:06:39 PM »

Hi, Andy
Me too, but you are further away!

I did Maldon last year, and got a slew of good photos - these could also be made available

I love tree-wood boats (and iron ones , and luminum ones, and.....)




andrew
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andrewh

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2009, 05:09:34 PM »

Some eejit stood in front of the camera



There were two Barges in action all day - I guess they are trip-round-the-lighthouse boats
andrew

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peter.dwight

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2009, 09:03:52 PM »

Hello Andrew.
You speak of "Tree Wood" is there any other kind?
Regards.
Peter.
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tigertiger

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2009, 03:34:05 AM »

Great pics

Thanks for sharing Andrew

I now have a better idea of sail colours.

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andrewh

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2009, 01:21:47 PM »

Peter,

"Tree wood" - yes, lots of other types :}
There's Hydulignum, "Improved wood", ply wood, Chip board

I use the term to mean the stuff that grows, more or less "as it grows", but I would happily include scandanavian laminated timbers in that category!

TT - I was visiting the Wash yesterday - the local boats all have "red" sails - even tho they are dacron (or similar) and it was very noticeable that the colours varied enormously depending on age, amount of light they had seen, etc.  They are alll matt and all attractive but all manner of colours from pinks through to dark mahogany. 
I tried to  admire your dyeing in your Bodger's thread but the Post-fairy stole it  - I though it looked good for a sail about 10 months after its last dressing :}

FWIW - I have sailed a Thames barge in the spring with newly dressed sails - they are glisteney with linseed oil and after an hour,  so are the crew.  The colour is powdered ochre and it transfers neatly to anyone who comes near it, or anything it has touched.
andrew

I believe the original recipe for the sail dressing could include fish oil and horses urine, so i think myself lucky :}
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tigertiger

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2009, 12:33:31 PM »


andrew

I believe the original recipe for the sail dressing could include fish oil and horses urine, so i think myself lucky :}


The word 'auspice' come to mind.

So you are saying my sail colour is OK?
If so I will leave it.
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andrewh

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Re: Ships and wrecks at Pinmill and Snape
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2009, 04:27:12 PM »

TT

Auspice?  I thought that was chicken entrails?
Or is it the herbs Austrailians throw on the barbie?

I liked your sail colour - There must be oodles of pics of LH original on the web - might be worth a hunt!

She is a gaffer, and when the sails are stowed (90% of their life) the folded-over top will get bleached in broad lines which are not quite parallel to either the boom or gaff.  The original would not have fitted gaskets as she was, I think, a working boat.

Looking forward to more of your build
andrew
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