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Author Topic: Fore foot??  (Read 1167 times)

cwmitch

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Fore foot??
« on: September 17, 2009, 07:36:57 PM »

I'm sure it's a silly question but I don't no the answer. Having spent ages looking at plans on anything
larger than a cruiser they all seem to have a fore foot what is it and what's it for? Thanks in advance
for any help.




Cheers Colin..
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Bugsy

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Re: Fore foot??
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 08:05:21 PM »

The part of a ship at which the prow joins the keel. %)
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gondolier88

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Re: Fore foot??
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 10:39:55 PM »

Its a ruler made a foot longer than the normal three foot for those instances where an object being measured is a little longer than 36inches....honest %)

Is there a post on here for a glossary of terms does anyone know?

Greg
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Shipmate60

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Re: Fore foot??
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 11:26:24 PM »

Yes,
Its on: http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/
on the menu on the left.

Bob
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gondolier88

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Re: Fore foot??
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 07:26:26 AM »

Thanks Bob.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Fore foot??
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2009, 05:23:35 PM »

The earlier reply re the "forefoot" is spot on. The first bit to hit the rocks if head on. But it has its equivelant at the back end called the "coffin plate". Carry on upwards from the coffin plate and you will arrive at the "oxter plates". These are at the curve of the hull where it goes from the vertical to the nearer horizontal. This ties in with the expression "up to his oxters", meaning armpits. A more polite way of saying "in deep poo". Lots of odd and traditional names come from ships...some nowadays considered "rude", for example, the "correct" name for the bottom of a block (of the tackle variety). BY.
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Notes from a simple seaman
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