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Author Topic: Pussers Rum ?  (Read 2312 times)

derekwarner

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Pussers Rum ?
« on: November 07, 2009, 09:08:11 am »

I am sure it was only a few weeks ago.... {:-{ mentions were made of senior British naval ratings......& what do I get today from No 3 youngest daughter...........Derek
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Derek Warner

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Circlip

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2009, 09:48:38 am »

Sure it hasn't been "Cut" ?????   O0

   egards   Ian.
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derekwarner

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2009, 01:51:29 pm »

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm thanks Circlip...the contents smelt like rum [foul] & had no seal....... & so has been tipped out  O0....interesting background??...

here is the Google link {-) %% - Derek

http://www.pussers.com/rum/products/decanter_aln/popup
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Derek Warner

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derekwarner

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2009, 02:27:07 pm »

 %%....I  am not tea total....... :((...but do not part take in RUM........Derek  %) %)

At the beginning of the 19th century, England was in a difficult position. Parts of the North American colonies had gained their independence from the crown. Spain was the undisputed ruler of the oceans and a strict enemy to England. English ships were often taken by the Spanish fleet and there was no defense against this. Europe had been conquered by Napoleon's French army and Britain was threatened by invasion. The British fleet was weak in number and suffered from uncreative leadership.

There was one British naval officer who was different - Horatio Nelson!

Admiral Nelson was an outstanding and strongly nonconformist leader. He did not follow the old and traditional patterns, but instead created his own solutions in the battles and engagements that he fought and later lead. In fact, at times his path to success was in direct defiance of the orders given him. He did not follow orders that he found useless or not according to his own concept, and because of his leadership and tactical genius, he was victorious in every major engagement he fought and was therefore never brought to task for his disobedience. He was constantly developing and evolving new tactics that became known as the "Nelson touch" as in the famous and vital Battle of Trafalgar, the largest sea battle ever fought between ships-of-the-line. He was popular and well-respected, and those he led worshipped him in contrast to the usual relationship between English military leaders and their men at that time. He was always personally in the thick of the fight. He appealed to the pride and patriotism of his sailors. This connection to his men, apart from winning the most important sea battle at the time and one of the greatest in the annals of naval warfare, made him a hero to not only his men and the Royal Navy, but to the common people of England where the Battle of Trafalgar, 200 years later, is still celebrated.Trafalgar was a turning point in world history.

The English fleet led by Nelson performed a miracle in defeating the combined French and Spanish fleets, thus destroying Spain's dominance of the world's oceans. Now Britain "ruled the waves" as the famous anthem goes. Britain had finally curtailed the Spanish predominance of the oceans and the end of French dominance of the European continent would soon follow. This victory opened the path to the construction of the British Empire, as no other European power could now prevent Britain's imperialism. Her Walls of Oak, as the wooden hulled ships of the Royal Navy were called, dominated the seas and gave cover to Britain's expansion, while Great Britain lay protected and secure behind them.

If Nelson had not prevailed at Trafalgar, the British Empire could not have happened, and the world today would be a very different place.

Producer: Pussers   -   www.pussers.com
ABV:   42%
Country of Origin:   British Virgin Islands

Category(s):     Rum
Group(s):     Navy Rum

PricingSize Availability Price Unit Price Buy Desire
1 Litre Bottle 11th Nov 2009 61.33  Add to Basket Add to WishList

8 Products From this ProducerProduct Availability Size Price
PUSSERS - 15 Year Old 11th Nov 2009   70cl Bottle 34.82
PUSSERS - Admiral Lord Nelson Ships Decanter 11th Nov 2009   1 Litre Bottle 61.33
PUSSERS - Blue Label 11th Nov 2009   70cl Bottle 24.07
PUSSERS - Nelson's Blood Flagon 11th Nov 2009   1 Litre Bottle 52.79
PUSSERS - Original Grog 11th Nov 2009   1 Litre Bottle 5.69
PUSSERS - Painkiller In Stock   1 Litre Bottle 6.01
PUSSERS - Red Label 11th Nov 2009   70cl Bottle 22.79
PUSSERS - Trafalgar 15 Year old Ceramic Decanter 11th Nov 2009   1 Litre Bottle 80.09

No Product ReviewsClick Here to be the first to review this product.

Producer InformationPrior to 1740, the men's daily tot of Pusser's Rum was a pint a day, which they drank neat, that is without water! Before battle, they were issued a double 'tot', and always after victory for a job well done! From 1655 to the 19th century, Pusser's Rum was one of the few daily comforts afforded those early seamen of Britain's Navy as they fought around the globe to keep the Empire intact and its sea lanes open. It was not until July 31st, 1970 that the Admiralty Board abolished the daily issue of Pusser's Rum. "Times had changed", they said as they concluded that "in a highly sophisticated navy no risk for margin or error which might be attributable to rum could be allowed". And so it was that the daily issue of Pusser's Rum, which had stood the test of time as the Navy's longest serving tradition for over 300 years, was cast aside like a piece of flotsam and jetsam where it lay quietly until 1979.
In 1979, Charles Tobias - entrepreneur, global sailor, raconteur - sought to resurrect the Pusser's Rum tradition. He obtained the rights and all the blending information from the Admiralty, and formed Pusser's Ltd. on Tortola in the British Virgin Islands and began bottling and selling this storied spirit in 1980 to the public for the first time. (Prior to then, it was restricted to the Royal Navy). British Navy Pusser's Rum is the same Admiralty blend of five West Indian rums as issued on board British warships, and it is with the Admiralty's blessing and approval that Pusser's is now available to the consumer.
The Royal Navy Sailor's Fund, a naval charity more commonly called the "Tot Fund" receives a substantial donation from the sale of each bottle of British Navy Pusser's Rum. Aside from the fund's original bequest, the Pusser's contribution has become the fund's largest source of income.
Today's Pusser's Rum is still produced in exact accordance with the Admiralty's specifications for rum. Unlike most rums, Pusser's uses no flavoring agents. It is 100% natural. In 2001, Pusser's was awarded the "Gold Medal - World's Premier Dark Rum" at the International Wine & Spirits Festival. In 2003, Pusser's Rum won a "Double Gold Medal" at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition.
Charles Tobias continues today as CEO of Pusser's and its legendary rum, which is said by experts and epicureans alike to be rich and full-bodied, with an unsurpassed smoothness due to its natural ingredients. Pusser's costs a little more because it is more expensive to produce. It is predominantly a "pot-stilled" rum. The distillation process is similar to that used for single malt scotches, which produces greatly enhanced flavor. Its alcoholic content is also higher than most other rums which, when combined with a higher corresponding government tax for the higher proof, also increases its price. Nevertheles, we think you'll find the slightly higher price well worth what's in the bottle. Served neat or on the rocks, or mixed in a famous Caribbean inspired recipe?such as the Pusser's Painkiller you will enjoy the full and natural flavor of Pusser's Rum - and will really discern the big difference between Pusser's and all other rums
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Derek Warner

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Circlip

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2009, 02:50:58 pm »

Yep, but in later times, the "Bar Stewards" cut the rum ration with water to a half and half mix to stop the matalots "stock piling and having a jolly old time at one wallop.

   Regards  Ian.
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derekwarner

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2009, 03:21:24 pm »

mmmmmmmmmmmmmm thanks Circlip ........on the occasions at sea on an HMAS warship .......my beer cans were always pre opened/cracked in the ratings mess...however in the officers mess were  O0 open yourself

We understand the premise & order here  :-)) ....

.......the origin of the 'rum ration" goes way beyond .....having a drink...? but more a medical term........ I think......Derek


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Roger in France

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2009, 04:06:45 pm »

The thought that anyone could drink"....a pint of rum..." and certainly ".....a double tot..." and remain conscious let alone fight a battle is beyond belief.

Roger in France
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Deep Diver

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2009, 06:29:20 pm »

Hi derekwarner

Glad to say that I will be going for my TOT on Sunday (08/11/09) at the RNSM Gosport, as we send the rum rat to get the tot's just after the service. and I will raise my tin to you all. :-))

Also it will not be a G/S mix of three parts water to one part Rum, it will be a Submariners mix of one to one,

May we all keep our FEET Dry
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andygh

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2009, 06:30:59 pm »

Mmmmmm pussers, reminds me of my Dad, always got him a bottle at Christmas
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Arrow5

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2009, 08:08:48 pm »

Splice the mainbrace.
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Jimmy James

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2009, 08:31:57 pm »

Always did like my neaters----Wish my daughters were like yours!!!(3 of them only got me a case of Mead for last Xmas)
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derekwarner

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2009, 12:26:44 am »

Deep Diver said........ "Glad to say that I will be going for my TOT on Sunday (08/11/09) at the RNSM Gosport" .....that's today here in OZ....so we hope you enjoy it ....Derek   O0

....& Jimmy James......the Admiral Lord Nelson Ships Decanter 1 Litre Bottle  was actually purchased from the Rock & Roll pub @ Woolloomooloo just up the road from GID...I think our Bryan Young has had a drink or two there  {-) %% Derek  

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gondolier88

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2009, 11:34:43 pm »

I think the Aborigines may have had a few decanters left by Cook and his crew when they named the townships around by you Derek!

Greg
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derekwarner

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2009, 05:35:57 am »

 O0 gondolier88  {-) ...you are correct....Derek :-))

Subject: Re: Aboriginee language
Answered By: leli-ga on 24 Mar 2004 05:04 PST
   
Woolloomooloo means kangaroo, especially a young kangaroo.

The original Aboriginal word was pronounced more like "walla mulla".


"Woolloomooloo - from an Aboriginal word "Walla-mulla" meaning "young
male kangaroo"

This website quotes "The Book of Sydney Suburbs", compiled and edited
by Frances Pollon (1988)
http://homepages.ihug.com.au/~isaacyip/suburbs3.htm

==================================

"Wallamoula (Cadigal for kangaroo) to Woolloomooloo"

Heritage Council of New South Wales
http://www.heritage.nsw.gov.au/docs/placenames_policy.pdf

==================================

"Woolloomooloo thought to be an Aboriginal word for a young kangaroo."
http://www.boatingoz.com.au/articles/sydharnames.htm

==================================

". . . .the area was originally set aside by Governor Phillip as a
reserve for local Aborigines it took the name WALLA-MULLA meaning
young male kangaroo (the spelling being settled 1830.)"
http://www.darlinghurst.biz/woolloomooloo/history_views.htm
 
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Jimmy James

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Re: Pussers Rum ?
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2009, 01:20:18 pm »

Derek--Decoy,
  Thanks for the info-- Brian only lives about 150 miles N of me (By Road) But as an Ex-Submariner I have allready sourced a supply (It just that my 3 daughters Didn't supply it)

   I thought Kangaroo was ABBO for big toe??? The story as I remember it was that one of the officers with Cook shot an animal and then ask one of the ABBO guides what it was --- because as he was pointing at the animal's foot (Big Toe) the Abbo rightly said Kangaroo... The name stuck .... OR is that one of those tall tails Diggers tell poor Pom's :} {-) O0
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