Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down

Author Topic: HMS Velox - 1904  (Read 16118 times)

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2010, 03:43:22 PM »

I have started to cut the pieces from the etch sheet now and have formed a few up.

here is a collapsible boat
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2010, 03:46:05 PM »

Flying deck
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2010, 03:47:52 PM »

Raised stern and steering position
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2010, 03:49:58 PM »

More
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2010, 03:52:15 PM »

Test fit the flying deck
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2011, 09:23:04 AM »

Right, sorry for being quite so long on this project, did a lot of work on the G3 last summer and work has been very hectic the last few months, however . . . after much deliberation, trials, experiments I have come up with a solution for the larger parts that I could not make by photo etching.

I had a requirement that the parts had to be extremely light (working model, don't want it to roll over) - No metal castings, they had to be thin walled - Resin castings were tried, but the thin walls gave a lot of problems, I needed a lot of vents and they had to be consistent - hand building techniques could not produce the accuracy and consistency.

So it was time to think out the box!

The solution I felt was right for this model was to use a relatively new technique that I have used before in my work - Stereo lithography. The general concept of this process is the build the components required in 3D CAD and then a very cleaver computer program slices it in to thin layers and rebuilds the model in the real world out of resin. There are various ways of doing this, but the process I found and used after 6 months of investigation builds the model in 0.04mm thick layers so the resolution is very high.

The final computer model looked like this and is drawn at 1/96th.
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2011, 09:28:09 AM »

The final real world model looked like this.

Each square on the cutting mat is 10mm.
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2011, 09:41:01 AM »

I had achieved what I had set out to do and got wall thicknesses down to 0.1mm where they were required.

I then sat and looked at the model for a month before getting up the courage to slice it up.

After a bit of sanding to clean the base off I was very pleased with the results. The guns were especially pleasing as they came out with a 0.6mm bore already formed.
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2011, 09:43:09 AM »

Now it's onto the painting and the vents, even if I say so myself, are looking good  :embarrassed:
Logged

tonyH

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,275
  • Model Boat Mayhem Forum is the Best!
  • Location: Suffolk, England
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2011, 10:19:22 AM »

Beautiful job Mark,

I'm finishing off a 1:96, very semi-scale, version of Arquebuse with about the same dimensions and displacement as Velox. Hull is balsa/tissue with the rest being whats around the workshop.
She's only twin screw and I've used a pair of 15mm 3-blade props that I had lying around.
I've used 4 AAA NiMh cells spaced around the hull with a micro Rx and 2x6g servos for steering and a small on/off/reverse Bob's Board switcher.
Bath trials give a good scale speed BUT with the scale rudder steering is virtually non-existent, as it is with her bigger, 1:36, sister (See Pointy Thing threads)

Congrats on a superb project.

Tony :-))
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2011, 10:28:32 AM »

Hi Tony,

Yes, they are very fast craft on the water, but the steering in real life and on the models is terrible, thats why I went for some mixing as well or I would never get her back  {-)

Have been watching your thread with interest, I love the look of some of those French warships.

Mark
Logged

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2011, 10:37:35 AM »

Mark this is brilliant work, the mouldings are far more crisp than you could get from more traditional methods.  If I understand it correctly
you design the components on your CAD programme but how do you get it to the stereo lithography stage where the finished article is produced.
I take it that the machine that produces the finished item costs a bomb so you have to send the details away.
Who does this type of work and is it a costly process.
It makes the parts I have made look so rough and ready in comparison.
Geoff
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2011, 12:36:24 PM »

Hi Geoff,

I will try and explain this with out getting to techie and this ONLY applies to the actual machine used for these components before anyone starts telling me I have it wrong  <*<

If you can visualise the CAD model in the first picture above, this model is sent to the Stereo lithography agency and their computer slices up the model in the vertical axis into slices of 0.04mm thickness (much like putting it through a meat slicer but much thinner). The data is then feed one slice at a time to the stereo lithography machine which let a 0.04mm layer of liquid resin over a sheet of glass. The glass is like a laptop screen and it has an electronic negative image of that single slice. A flash goes off and anywhere that was exposed goes hard, the model thenmoves back 0.04mm and the process is repeated until the model is complete. It is then removed and hardended of completely in an oven. Total time for this particular model was 3 hours.

This is just a very basic explanation.

Logged

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2011, 01:12:33 PM »

Thanks Mark with your explanation and then looking it up on Wikipedia I get the idea - certainly takes model making into the 21st century
but is it very expensive.
Geoff
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #39 on: February 10, 2011, 01:19:15 PM »

No, it's not cheap, but also it's not as expensive as it used to be and you canproduce things withthis process that are not possible using other methods.

We in the boating world must start moving forward, the fly boys, boy racers and station masters out there are miles ahead of us.

Mark
Logged

steve pickstock

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #40 on: February 10, 2011, 01:28:58 PM »

We in the boating world must start moving forward, the fly boys, boy racers and station masters out there are miles ahead of us.

Mark

To be honest, to many wargamers it is black magic.
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #41 on: February 10, 2011, 04:42:16 PM »

 {-) If Black Magic worked, I wouldn't need to do all this!
Logged

tonyH

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,275
  • Model Boat Mayhem Forum is the Best!
  • Location: Suffolk, England
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #42 on: February 10, 2011, 05:33:47 PM »

It'll be interesting to compare Velox and Arquebuse in their handling. Jimmy James and I tested the 1:36 version under full control. I ran the motors independently while he handled the steering. She was ballasted down correctly and we had pretty well flat calm/very slight chop at Eaton Park in Norwich. We found that independent control of the screws made such a miniscule difference that I've decided not to mix in either scale.
That said, having the rudder ahead of the screws does not help matters.

Tony
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #43 on: February 11, 2011, 09:19:32 AM »

I was wondering what the handling would be like on the Arquebuse as the configuration did look strange, but this is what I like about the early boats. However I have found that the mixing on the Velox is about the only thing that gives me steering.
Logged

tonyH

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,275
  • Model Boat Mayhem Forum is the Best!
  • Location: Suffolk, England
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #44 on: February 11, 2011, 10:33:21 AM »

It was almost embarrassing actually. It was virtually impossible to moor up side on to the 'quay'. The only controlled way we managed was to drop anchor (lead weights) and drag back to moor stern first. This could have been the case with the real boats as well since almost all the photos show them being moored stern on.

Jimmy also kindly made a small jib, no bigger in area than a saucer, which would have been carried for use and this could easily overcome the steering even in light wind. Bearing in mind the boat is 5ft long, they must have had some trick that I haven't yet discovered to overcome the lack of 'driveability'. They did build a lot of them after all!

Tony :}
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #45 on: February 21, 2011, 06:49:25 PM »

I have been working on the guns this weekend and this is the first chance I have had to combine the photo etchings and 3D models.

The shoulder stock is made from 0.4 x 0.75mm (.015 x .030") micro strip.
Logged

marmoi

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #46 on: February 21, 2011, 06:50:49 PM »

When lined up, I am very pleased with the outcome.
Logged

tonyH

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,275
  • Model Boat Mayhem Forum is the Best!
  • Location: Suffolk, England
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #47 on: February 21, 2011, 07:11:18 PM »

Very nice work. The photo etch bits really add a lot.

Tony
Logged

mogogear

  • Guest
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #48 on: March 10, 2011, 07:01:20 PM »

Such nice work!!...I have such a long way to go-- but work like this is a goal for sure!!
Logged

White Ensign

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 779
  • Limits must be limited!
  • Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Re: HMS Velox - 1904
« Reply #49 on: April 20, 2011, 07:53:49 PM »

Gentlemen, do you mean something like this? Made it scratch about 9 years ago, scale 1:100  {-)


Best regards,Jörg
Logged
When God created planet earth, he made it with 75% of water. Bet he had the modelboaters on his mind!
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up