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Author Topic: frame shapes for hull  (Read 1215 times)

duckman903

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frame shapes for hull
« on: February 25, 2010, 05:57:35 pm »

I may give it a go at making my own plug and hull , now the ? is where do I get a set of frame shapes to start with. I can fix a machine with my eyes closed (have done it) but have never built a plug before .  :-)
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Colin Bishop

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2010, 06:07:32 pm »

You need a body plan for your proposed hull which you can scale down to the size you want. You can use the body plan sections as patterns for your frames but you will of course need to allow for the thickness of the planking over the top of them. Essentially you are building a hull and then using it as a plug. There are other ways of creating a plug but this is the most common. For more info on body plans see here: http://ntl.bts.gov/DOCS/narmain/naintro.html

Colin
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Bryan Young

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2010, 06:30:47 pm »

Colin is, as usual, spot on. He mentions the use of "sections" from a hull drawing. This is not the first time I've drawn attention to this misuse of the term "frames". A "frame" is a physical entity. Frames on a traditionally built ship are around 22" apart. So if you want to build a model using frames you will finish up with having made hundreds of them. Builders of "Admiralty" models are used to this.
However, "Stations" are not a physical thing. They are sort of datum points on a drawing of a ships hull to give an overall view of a ships lines. These, in general, are more than adequate for building a model hull. They are easy to understand as they are at regularly spaced intervals and so are easy to put into position (longitudinally). When the hull shape becomes more complicated at the bow and stern the station spacing is halved or even quartered.....making life a lot simpler. Having said all that, build the "plug" upside down. Think about it, and you'll see why (especially at the ends). Good luck. BY.
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Notes from a simple seaman

Perkasaman2

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2010, 12:49:24 am »

Hi Duckman 903, This video may also be helpful ................ :-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8e6Ei5UvLqI&feature=related
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Umi_Ryuzuki

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2010, 01:09:22 am »

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seahawk 1

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2010, 05:11:20 am »

How about these...  8)

http://www.pclsg.com/poshsemco.com.sg/PDF/POSH%20Concorde.pdf

Thanks for that link.....  In 1/32 scale, it measures out to 91" OAL with 21" beam.  Just right.. %) {-)

Mike
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wbeedie

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Re: frame shapes for hull
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2010, 09:43:50 am »

Bill Woods is showing how to do a plug  on http://www.trawlerphotos.co.uk/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=1101&page=2   just now
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