Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6   Go Down

Author Topic: Racundra  (Read 44168 times)

Norseman

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3,486
  • Location: Huyton, Liverpool
Re: Racundra
« Reply #100 on: March 28, 2012, 03:28:33 PM »

Just found your build again post meltdown  :-))

Dave
Logged

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #101 on: April 01, 2012, 10:11:53 PM »

Hi Dave!

I melt my lead, and the mayhem site melts also. A coincidence? Maybe not...  %%

Bryan, over on his Admiral's Barge build, is detailing costs of a scratchbuilt. And I think that's a good idea ... non-scratchbuilders might not have a real feeling for how much money a build takes.

Here's Racundra, to date (figures rounded to whole British poundses):

Plywood for hull.........................8
Glue for entire build...................15
Balsa...................................50
Glassfibre Stuff........................22
Running Gear............................38
Fimo.....................................4
Sails, Sheets and Brasswork.............18
Radio and Electrics.....................75
The Secret New Winch Mark IV............25
Lead..................................free
Pine for decking and spars............free


Making a grand total of (whips out calculator) £255. You can probably bung another £40 on for paints and further brasswork, but <£300 for a unique model and a build spread over a couple of years is pretty much nothing.

This much fun for 40p a day?  O0 Try it!

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #102 on: April 15, 2012, 04:04:44 PM »

Definitely time for a photo!



Those who've been following this thread will notice that the last jib winch has been completely rebuilt subtly remodelled, and this new one firmly fixed into place.

Using some birthday money (thanks, Mum) I put in a request to those helpful people at technobots.com for some bits and pieces. Specifically, a mucho-geared motor that prefers 12V to anything else, some plastic chain and sprockets.

The chain comes in a kit, and needs to be assembled, but it's not unsatisfying work. The end result is a slopless mesh with the sprockets, one of which is connected to a 300-sized motor geared down to whip out a mighty 37 rpm. The result is slow but torquey. Extremely so. The other sprocket was gently persuaded to fit onto a Meccano axle - it came with a 4mm diameter hole, but Mr Hammer soon sorted that out and it's now decided it rather likes 8-gauge metal rods.

In the photos above and below, the three-by-five Meccano plate slides effortlessly along its track, from end to end, in about three seconds. The microswitches - with the required Little Wooden Blocks of "Stop" - prevent movement beyond the track.



There's loads of room for sheeting down here, next to the centreboard case. I'll tidy the wiring up, though, and blank off the moving parts from the sheets, should they ever slop about. My current plan is for a cloth bag, made to fit this area, which'll keep me from embarrassment.

Total movement for the winch is around 16cm.

With tackle to double the throw, and port and starboard jibsheets run out of the front and back of the winch, I should have enough sheeting to tack with impunity. Certainly there's a pile o' pull here: it's extremely difficult to stop the movement with a finger. If the "1lb-per-square-foot" figure is right for wind force, then I'm laughing. Indeed, I could probably shorten the boat if I tied the sternpost to the winch and moved it forwards. ... In which case I suppose I wouldn't be laughing so hard.



Next up? There's a loose servo in the first picture. That's going to wiggle the rudder.

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

Martin [Admin]

  • Administrator
  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 19,098
  • Location: Peterborough, UK
    • Model Boat Mayhem
Re: Racundra
« Reply #103 on: April 15, 2012, 04:37:34 PM »


Ah, fond memories of Meccno....  :-))
Logged
"This is my firm opinion, but what do I know?!"    -   Mayhem FaceBook Group!

Norseman

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3,486
  • Location: Huyton, Liverpool
Re: Racundra
« Reply #104 on: April 15, 2012, 06:23:06 PM »

Martin, you and Andy seem to be fans so here's Meccano's - Cammel Lairds 100 Ton Crane - about 1960


Dave


Logged

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #105 on: August 04, 2013, 12:43:49 AM »

476 days since the last posting, I think it's maybe time for an update.  %%

...More later this week!

(Warning:  might include hull paint, but probably won't include the comfy chairs)

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

Tug-Kenny

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7,680
  • Location: Newport. S Wales
Re: Racundra
« Reply #106 on: August 04, 2013, 11:08:20 AM »


We've waited this long.  Another week will just fly by.

                           {-) {-) {-) {-)


Ken
Logged
Despite the high cost of living   .......... It remains popular

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #107 on: September 16, 2013, 11:09:03 PM »

Another week?! Erm ... or six.  :embarrassed:

But I have been busy. Oh yes. In between all the other stuff required to keep a roof over my head.  <:(

Here's the proof:



Dodgy camera this time, and via a different server - but the decks are done.

I sliced up some lovely pine with the Proxxon tablesaw, slathered the sides with black electrical tape, and got sticking the wood down onto the false deck. Result? A fabby pine deck looking just right. This has had a couple of coats of varnish and sanding and is ssmmootthh. Needed here are the toerail (causing me nightmares - more on this next time) the rubbing strip (ditto), a couple of anchors, the samson posts and the dinghy.

The cover for the forward hatch is underway - and I feel good about it - while that wee triangular breakwater positioned to save the mast step from soaking was also used for the halyards' tie-offs: which, in a strange way, is all starting to make sense with regards to the design behind the real thing. Cabin sides are now covered in pine strips and are much stronger - but are on the verge of needing their portholes cutting out again.

Next!



Stern end. Not much to see here, but she's smooth: a few last splodges of Milliput need sanding down, and the cream paint can be finished. The waterline is about right - this'll get repainted once the cream's done. There will be an external (non-scale) push rod for the tiller - coming out of the red tube - but you'll never see it. Much.

Pintles and gudgeons need marrying up here, but the rudder and tiller look the bees' knees, and should all work well.

More!



Comfy seats!!! At last!!! I did promise them!  %)

(Milliputted "leather cushions" now adorn the cockpit. The gap on the portside of these is for the 1/8th scale helmsman's bum.  ;D The benches for these were made up in pine strips - the same pine material that is being slapped on the coaming inside and out to provide a better surface.

"Slapped" as in adding an inch or so per night.  {:-{

The mizzen tabernacle space is done - there'll be a compass in here later - and (outside the coaming) the decking looks great: I'm really pleased with it. The shroud deadeyes are firmly mounted through the deck, and outside these I need to fit the toerail all round the edge of the decking. Outside this, on the hull sides, is the rubbing strip which (I suspect) will require superglue, lots of carving and swearing.

But! (You know what?)

I am getting there. I'm ready to start rigging (everything's done up top) once the hull sides are finished and a stand is made. The list of "needing done" is evaporating - at last!

 :-))

Sailing? Well - how about when the ice melts at Riga, early next year?

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #108 on: September 20, 2013, 09:53:11 PM »



I've realised, when scratchbuilding, it's the little things that take the most time.

And here we have a pair of 1/8th scale spectacles, wireframe 1920's vintage. These are attempt #7. Or #8. The wearer is even now being painted.
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #109 on: September 22, 2013, 08:22:31 PM »

From Racundra's First Cruise:[/font]

In the working drawings for her there had been a neat galvanized iron saddle and ring by way of gaff jaws, but the builder, saving time and money, had not bought it, and, at the last minute, had made wooden jaws, with holes for the lacing bored far too big, thereby weakening a contraption which even apart from that was rather ineffectively held together by screws.

We heard a loud crack aloft, but nothing had come down, and from the steering-well we could see no damage.

I went forward to take a look at things. I saw at once that the parrel rings of the gaff jaws were hanging loose, that the gaff jaws were broken, and that the broken side of the jaws was jammed into place by a halyard, which, bar-taut, was the only thing that kept the gaff from breaking loose. This was pretty unpleasing, but, after watching it for a minute or two, I became convinced that nothing would shift it so long as we held the wind on the starboard side, which we should do until we came to Reval Bay. In any case we were moving finely, and this place, with Sandgrund, Grasgrund and the Locust Rock all to be avoided, was not the one to choose for a stoppage for repairs.

[/font]
During the night, with the mainsail down and Racundra facing fierce winds under mizzen and staysail only:
[/font]

The Cook struggled up the companion-way with a sandwich. She asked, with real inquiry, "Are we going to be drowned before morning?"

I leaned forward from the steering-well and shouted, "Why?"

"Because I have two thermos flasks full of hot coffee. If we are, we may as well drink them both. If not, I'll keep one till tomorrow."


[/font](Cook was Evgenia, Trotsky's former secretary, and soon to be Ransome's second wife)[/font]So the lessons here are: don't over-bore the parrel rope holes, don't use woodscrews on your gaff jaws, and - if you like coffee - tell your mistress that you will probably drown before dawn.

Taking two of these lessons to heart (I don't drink coffee
[/font] %) ) here's my gaff jaws:

[/font]

...Just awaiting a splash of varnish and the sails bending on.

And now, trick of the day!

The circular forward hatch cover will fit snuggly over the switches near the bow of the boat. For the sides of the cover, I needed to stick on 40-or-so short planks of wood, butting against the edges of the plywood hatch cover. Realising that this would take far too long, I took a shortcut.

With a pile of planklets cut out to just over length, I stuck these to a long strip of electrical tape. Armed with glue and cable ties, along with not enough hands, here's the result:



Instant barrel, without the fiddly hassles of individual plank-gluing. The inside of the planks has received a couple of long strips of PVA'd paper to hold it all together, and - once set - I'll run more PVA into the plank edges on the outside before sanding all smooth. It works a treat: but ensure you measure out enough planks (two-pi-r) and have a couple of narrower strips to plug the inevitable gap at the ends of the tape-mounted planks before you set off.

The hole? There's a porthole in the top of this hatch which'll get added once the edges have been sanded smooth.

Andy
[/font]
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #110 on: October 08, 2013, 01:55:34 AM »

And now - the torus:

In geometry, a torus (pl. tori) is a surface of revolution generated by revolving a circle in three-dimensional space about an axis coplanar with the circle. If the axis of revolution does not touch the circle, the surface has a ring shape and is called a ring torus or simply torus if the ring shape is implicit.

Neat! Additionally neat is the fact that the volume of a torus is 2*PI*R*r2, where R is the major radius centred on the outer circle, and r the radius of that circle. How cute is that?With that sinking in, we might also wish to consider the preposition that the shape of the very universe is that of a three dimensional surface of a four dimensional torus.

And what, you might ask, our heads stuffed full of imagining four dimensional tori (if not literally exploding) has this to do with Racundra?

Good question.

Take a bite of ring doughnut and read on...

Racundra, in every photo, has two lifebelts shown on the main or mizzen shrouds.

Here they are on the mizzens during the Summer of 1923:



Clearly I need to make two tori.
Setting to:



^ Here's a plywood circle, bottom left, and four balsa rings, made from calculating the required radii for each height of a circular torus, made of two balsa blocks, to be situated above and below the circle. (And when, exactly, did balsa move from being a sensible 6.35mm thick to 5mm thick?) Grrr!
Glue up and suitably clamp these on a suitable flat surface under suitable weights:



Carve them to shape - I used a Stanley Knife - and sand (via various grades) to the correct profile. After about fifteen enjoyable minutes you get this:



The dark line is the ply former, while the fadey black line marked the middle of the outer layers of balsa at top and bottom - handy when sanding the torus to shape. I have lifebelts!

They need a surface finish (tissue and dilute PVA) and a paint job of off-white canvas.

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #111 on: October 13, 2013, 11:06:57 PM »

Racundra's in the paint shop.

The underwater bits have had two layers of Revell's lovely Aqua Color acrylic black applied to them. The paint is something I recommend: it's water-soluble, the brush cleans very easily, there's no smell and it dries flat in about ten minutes. The only downside, if pushed, is Revell's spelling of the word "colour".

Meanwhile, I've mixed up the cream colour for the upperworks, and taped off the waterline. Previously the waterline was defined by laser level, which produced (on a hull as Rotund-a as Racundra's) a series of straight lines that looked "not great" in real life. This time I've gone for the distinctly low-tech "pencil on a block" technique, taped to that line, and it looks much better.

First coat is on, on the portside. It'll need three before I'll be removing the tape. But it's "ok" after layer one.

Once the paint's dried, both sides, it's off for some lettering and some waterline scum, before a sealing layer of flat/satin varnish. Probably sprayed.

Andy


Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dlancast

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,418
  • Location: Bellingham, Washington USA
Re: Racundra
« Reply #112 on: October 29, 2013, 03:46:36 PM »

Andy, very fine work indeed.  I am really enjoying this build!  Can't wait for the next post and pics.


Regards,


Dennis
Logged

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #113 on: November 03, 2013, 01:44:03 PM »

Thanks, Dennis. And here it is!



The rope-making machine.

My rope trials at the moment are being made with standard polyester thread. Running even numbers of loops along my rope-walk to the above contraption, and then engaging the single-speed 15:1 manually-operated gearbox, I'm able to bung on about 1000 twists-per-metre in just a few minutes. I'm still working on the best tension/twist for these initial strands, and fully agree with Longridge in his Anatomy of Nelson's Ships book: rope-making is more of an art than a science.

But the end results are getting there! With the twisted triple strands hooked together, and wound up the other way, the end result is definitely <ahem> "ropey".  :-))



On the left, 24-strand rope. Needs a bit more initial tension, I think, to make it tighter and decrease its stretchiness, which is currently a bit too high for shroud use.

On the right, 18 and 12-strand cable-laid early experiments (cable-laid through turning the handle the wrong way!) I can see a rope version of the 18-strand being good for sheets: it doesn't stretch, does bend easily, and scales to around a half-inch diameter. Pretty-near perfect!

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #114 on: November 03, 2013, 04:47:04 PM »

The wobbling board at the back.



I'm tempted to increase the area of the rudder - a small piece of transparent plastic let into the aft and underside of the rudder should do the the trick. We'll see if it's necessary following sailing trials early next year. I hope it isn't required...

Andy

Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

minisail.cz

  • Shipmate
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
  • Model Boating is Great!
  • Location: Jablonec nad Nisou, Czech republic
    • minisail.cz - The World of Small Big Sailing Ships
Re: Racundra
« Reply #115 on: November 06, 2013, 09:27:28 PM »

Hi to all in this nice thread... I cant help myself and I must react!

Few years ago I came across this nice forum when I was searching websites for some materials of Ransome's Racundra. Simply, I like his nice books (as many of us  ok2 ) and I do plan to build Racundra (once). From that time I returned time to time here - just to know what is new. I had also suffered from the long pause in dreadnought72 posts as many of us (am I right  %) ?). Frankly I fully understand that...

I like the way of building her Andy - nice job!

Jiri, Czech Republic

Something more about me - I run the web site http://www.minisail.cz  for a group of scale modelers in my country who like classicc sailing ships - and make working models - for fun and for competition in real regatas. Now I am working on my Colin Archer RS No1 - nice double ender like Racundra is.
Logged
another armchair sailor who loves scale sailing ships

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #116 on: November 06, 2013, 10:32:55 PM »

Dobrư večer, Jiri!

Welcome to the Mayhem!

It's lovely to know that another Racundra may well be sailing in the future.

Do I have any advice to offer? Well - I'm pretty sure the original plans are in the Brotherton Library in Leeds, along with many other items and documents from Ransome's life. I would have preferred to have built from these plans rather than use what I had available. And I suspect there are many more photos of her in the archives, than appear in the usual books - these could answer questions about the boat that I do not have perfect answers to.

Any more advice? Maybe make it bigger.  This one is a handy size to work on, at 1/8th scale and 1.13m long, but I think the scale effects that I'm anticipating would be eased if she were larger. Perhaps 1/6th or 1/5th ... or even 1/4 scale if time, space and money were not so important objects.

As to the delays in construction, and updating the build here, I can only say "sorry". Boat building is a hobby for me, and has to fit in with two jobs, my family, and - of course - my wallet. I have wondered in the past if I'll ever get a boat sailing - but Racundra is definitely nearing the final stages, and I will, with some delight, detail her first sail (and the lessons learnt) next year, here on MBM.

Thanks for stopping by!

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

minisail.cz

  • Shipmate
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
  • Model Boating is Great!
  • Location: Jablonec nad Nisou, Czech republic
    • minisail.cz - The World of Small Big Sailing Ships
Re: Racundra
« Reply #117 on: November 07, 2013, 06:57:38 PM »

Andy, thanks for your advices!

Well - the plans - I have the Arthur Ransome under sail book a nice one. I know the plan there (and also posted here) is not perfect - but good enaught. From my experience the original plans are often different from the real ship thanks some changes made during ship-build. I have bought some plans from Sparkman&Stephens archive - e.g. deck layout for schooner Brilliant and if you compare it with the real ship photographs you can find many changes ... But it is always very nice to have a copy of original plan in your hand... So, I fully agree it would be nice to have them for Racundra.

Make it bigger  %)   a nice idea...
But one limit is my car and the second limit is the weight/displacement. Most of our ships we sail here are 8 ... 16 kg. This is good to put them on the water when you are alone on the shore. Only few ship here is more than 18 ... 20 kg. And the only one (S/Y Lulworth) as far as I know is 27 kg! The owner had to built even a special troley to be able to sail her. It is a very nice moment when he is waiting for the ship, standing in the water with the troley in front of him and with the radio in his hand to control the ship till the final moment. He is excellent.
BTW the LWL above 1m is another >rule< for succesful navigating ship on our ponds - so you are 100% OK  :}

Hope you will find enaught time to bring Racundra on the water next year. I cross my finger for it.
Yeaah it is only a hobby - and I nearly stop it for last two years because of changing my job. I was able just keep my webpage running for my friends and time to time see them and talk to them. So as I wrote I fully understand.

Let's continue

Ahoy
Jiri
Logged
another armchair sailor who loves scale sailing ships

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #118 on: July 19, 2014, 06:06:40 PM »



Coaming complete - and the traditional detritus left by a lazy carpenter!

The eyelet in the tiller and coaming sides are for the rudder control lines which are going to have to be run into the cabin. A servo with a matching (long) arm is in place to drive the movement, though I'll only get about +/- 25 degrees this way. Will it be enough?

Bollards are resin, courtesy of Chylds Hall Model Shipyard - a perfect size for this boat.

More next time!

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

derekwarner

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8,085
  • Location: Wollongong Australia
Re: Racundra
« Reply #119 on: July 19, 2014, 11:32:20 PM »

Good to see your Racundra build progressing Andy  :-)) .... don't worry about the wooden shavings appearing in the pictures....but those chippies <*< should at least bin the used sand paper before the camera reappears  {-)

The +/- 25 degrees with such a small rudder surface area does appear to be marginal.......but as you said......'we'll see ....following sailing trials early next year'

Derek
Logged
Derek Warner

Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #120 on: July 20, 2014, 12:51:54 AM »

The submerged rudder area is about sixteen square inches - surely that's quite a bit for a 44" hull? - so an experiment is definitely called for. A secret motor/rudder test in some nearby body of water will be happening shortly.

If it needs more area, I don't mind adding a non-scale extension. More throw? Then I'm maybe scuppered.

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #121 on: July 21, 2014, 12:57:46 PM »

Today? Up to my elbows in PVA. I'm making the mast hoops.

I'm using a similar technique to the one Greg wrote about in 2009. Long shavings of pine are extracted from my plane, smeared with runny PVA, wound around a non-stick mandrel to a depth of about five layers, and then clamped until dry.

These wooden Hula Hoops are then cut into rings using a Stanley knife, by eye to a depth of 3mm, and lightly sanded top and bottom.

The result? Perfect circles, with a width of 1.5mm across the laminations - and surprisingly tough.  :-))

I need five for the mizzen, and eight for the mainsail (bigger internal diameter). Then it's off to raid the bead-box for parrels, and rigging will commence!

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,871
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Racundra
« Reply #122 on: July 23, 2014, 12:20:48 AM »

Today: mast hoops cut, sanded, varnished ... loops added to mast hoops ... sails bent ... sails temporarily rigged to masts ...

... And all of a sudden I'm looking at a boat.  :o

A real, live, saily boat, for the first time in "several" years since the plans first caught my eye.

Wow.

It even looks like the original.

This is a stunning evening.  :-))

Andy





Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

vnkiwi

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,600
  • Location: SE Asia
Re: Racundra
« Reply #123 on: July 23, 2014, 01:46:09 AM »

pictures, pictures, pictures, please, please O0
Logged
If it ain't broke. Don't fix it !

Brian60

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3,315
  • Location: Hull,UK-but currently residing in Los Martinez, Spain.
Re: Racundra
« Reply #124 on: July 23, 2014, 05:20:57 PM »

Where has this topic been hiding, you've had most of the problems I've come across in my build a couple of years before I got to them!

I'm surprised you got the wood shavings to work, mine failed miserably, maybe it is down to scale size? Mine were only 12mm in diameter and were faar too soft when the glue was set to have any strength.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6   Go Up