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Author Topic: TID superstructure  (Read 1537 times)

tomo55

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TID superstructure
« on: March 05, 2010, 06:23:43 AM »

Hi Building a TID from MMM.A couple of questions regarding the superstructure.

1.What is the best material to build the superstructure from Plasticard or ply?

2.What is the best way to transfer the superstructure shapes from the plan to the wood/Plasticard is it by using tracing / greaseproof paper,Thats the only way I can think of?

3. Are there any suppliers or superstructures in GF that might suit?

Only built kits of boats/aero in the past so this is new to me and Id like to make a good job of it.

Thanks in advance.Chris
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HS93 (RIP)

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2010, 07:25:28 AM »

I got to my local copier shop and get a few copies of the plan , two reasons. one I put the original away to keep safe in case I have a glue attack etc, but the main reason is I always cut one up in to strips   eg plan view, side view, any other views as you can open them easy on a bench to look at in detail quickly , I am not a fan of sticking them on the wall as it is not easy for me to take measurements off them ,  if I need templates I have a second plan I can use for them , I have  a roll of double sided tape the thickness of selotope X 1/2 wide and putt a bit of that on the back near cutting edges. as you can pull it off the wood  /plasic easy. I pay Localy 2.65 a full sized plan copy so it's worth it, photo copying at home on a PC can be a bit hit and miss because very few will do a good enough 1 to 1 copy


peter
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tomo55

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2010, 07:43:04 AM »

Thanks Peter,good idea the photocopying I shall get a couple done.Should of thought of that as I've used our local photocopying shop several times for enlarging / reducing aero plans.
Thanks again.Chris
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: TID superstructure (Plan Scanning?)
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2010, 08:38:53 AM »

On a side note...
 Anyone know if copy shops will scan plans to CD or PenDrive?
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HS93 (RIP)

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2010, 09:16:36 AM »

some can , mine will also print from cds and pen drives including PDF to any size..

Peter
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oldiron

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2010, 10:34:01 AM »

Hi Building a TID from MMM.A couple of questions regarding the superstructure.

1.What is the best material to build the superstructure from Plasticard or ply?

2.What is the best way to transfer the superstructure shapes from the plan to the wood/Plasticard is it by using tracing / greaseproof paper,Thats the only way I can think of?

3. Are there any suppliers or superstructures in GF that might suit?

Only built kits of boats/aero in the past so this is new to me and Id like to make a good job of it.

Thanks in advance.Chris

  In response to your questions:
1) This is to a great degree a matter of preference. I've built superstructures from both and combinations of same. Ply is stronger in the long run, less susceptible to the effects of heat (leaving the vessel in the car on a warm sunny day), but can be a little harder to cut out rectangular openings such as small square windows, doors and hatches. Fastening together is quick and easy with cyano. Styrene doesn't tend to be as strong, but , I find, it isquicker to work with and easier to make small parts with.

2) I find just taking measurements from the drawings provided and transferring those measurements to the material works well for me. On occasion I've used tracing paper for unusual shapes, but not often.

3) Probably not. Hulls are usually readily available, but seldom superstructures. A TID superstructure is a straight forward build anyway.

You may want to look at this thread for ideas: http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=13720.0

John
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tomo55

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2010, 12:22:00 PM »

Thanks for your replies.very helpful.
                                   Chris
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tomo55

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2010, 02:38:13 PM »

would it be best to build the superstructure as a series of boxes or as a complete unit?
this is my first attempt at a non kit boat so help welcomed,
chris
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oldiron

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2010, 03:36:31 PM »

would it be best to build the superstructure as a series of boxes or as a complete unit?
this is my first attempt at a non kit boat so help welcomed,
chris

  If it were me, I'd build it as a complete unit. If you find thats too much divide the engine room cover off as a seperate unit. Here again, its a matter of personal preference

John.
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peter.dwight

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Re: TID superstructure
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2010, 10:39:20 PM »

Greetings. Re transfering details from drawing to material. The old ways are often still the best. The way I would go about it would be to use the good old fashioned dividers assisted by the set square and steel ruler. You can get very accurate transfer of the data. Also if as i assume you have a full size drawing you can measure it up and redraw it full size on your computer drawing package and print it off, stick it to the material with paper glue, cut it out and soak the paper off. Modern drawing packages and printers produce very accurate results.
Another idea if you are new to this type of construction is to make it in cardboard first. Cereal packets and other similar things yield a lot of free material. Cut it out, stick it together and see what happens. If you are happy commit to your material if not cut it about as required, or bin it and start again.
I hope I have been of some help.
Regards.
Peter.
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