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Author Topic: tug towing lights  (Read 10935 times)

Le Caux Deux

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2010, 05:34:08 PM »

How many yards long is a yard then?

I hate to ask!

Mike
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Netleyned

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2010, 05:42:54 PM »

As long as it needs to be


Ned
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brianB6

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2010, 09:46:42 PM »

As long as a piece of string
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: tug towing lights?
« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2010, 06:50:51 AM »

'How long as a piece of string?'... Easy! Twice as long as half it's length!  %)

Seriously though,  are ships mast lights as important these days?
 Do skippers stop and work out what the light configuration is or does it just come 2nd nature?
 What I mean by that is (I think), although I guess skippers have to be able to 'read' them, are they actually read or just an
 indicator that there is a vessel over there... the more lights it has, the more I need to avoid it!


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pugwash

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #29 on: December 02, 2010, 08:02:13 AM »

Martin I don't know about captains and officers of big ships who have collision avaoidance radar and many
orher electronic gadgets but one group of people still have to be able to read the lights and that is yachtsmen -
they are usually sailing about 5-7 knots so have to take early avoiding action and to be able to identify what is coming
towards them out of the dark is very helpful - eg. when we were sailing across Biscay we saw two boats coming towards us
about mile apart, we were going to sail directly between them until we saw the "pair trawling lights" and realised they were
connected to each other.  We had to make a very quick turn to get round the outside of them,
Geoff
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Le Caux Deux

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #30 on: December 02, 2010, 12:30:24 PM »

I'm glad we are back to the original subject - the side track was a bit of fun, but I'd like to ask a serious question

not just about towing lights

How high does the stern light have to be, is their a rule, I'm struggling to get all the wires inside my mast, and if I can move my stern light onto the same level as my nav lights it makes life a lot easier.

Mike
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sailorboy61

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Re: tug towing lights?
« Reply #31 on: December 02, 2010, 07:50:12 PM »

'How long as a piece of string?'... Easy! Twice as long as half it's length!  %)

Seriously though,  are ships mast lights as important these days?
 Do skippers stop and work out what the light configuration is or does it just come 2nd nature?
 What I mean by that is (I think), although I guess skippers have to be able to 'read' them, are they actually read or just an
 indicator that there is a vessel over there... the more lights it has, the more I need to avoid it!




Yep, still have to know what the lights mean...... tells you direction of travel, aspect (how the other ship is 'sitting' relative to yours which isnt always apparent on radar or indeed how it 'looks' on radar). also the different lights  indicate different types of ships and that then tells who has right of way etc. The 'young uns' of today may sit in their seats glues to the radar, ais and vhf for their collision avoidance, but real seamen look out the window, feel the breeze on their face and 'smell' the weather, these are the ones that can still work when the lights go out, something, in my experience at least alot of those from the electronic era aren't able to do!!
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Esprit350

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2010, 09:50:24 PM »

How about.............."If in front you see red and green...take a chance and go between!".  ;)
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Le Caux Deux

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2010, 12:00:24 PM »

I thought it was 'Red and Green should never be seen'

Mike
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Esprit350

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #34 on: December 05, 2010, 12:12:02 PM »

It's a joke!!!    Think about it - if you go in between red and green you'll hit head on!   %%
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Netleyned

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #35 on: December 05, 2010, 01:14:48 PM »

Green to Green or Red to Red
Lash the helm and go to bed

Ned
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Netleyned

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #36 on: December 05, 2010, 02:19:57 PM »

Joking aside I've not seen any height regs for stern lights
The regs state that it should be visible for 2 nautical miles over an arc of 135 degrees.


Ned

PS No doubt someone will come back with a height reg now I've posted this   %%
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Smooth seas never made skilful sailors
Up Spirits  Stand fast the Holy Ghost.
http://www.cleethorpesmba.co.uk/

Esprit350

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #37 on: December 05, 2010, 04:02:13 PM »

I remember doing "dipping lights" on my sailing training.  Due to the curvature of the earth, a light 2 miles away would have to be at a certian height to be seen.  I don't have the books that show how to work it out anymore though!  Doh!

This is why lighthouses etc have their height shown on charts so that sea farers can work out how far away they are.
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sailorboy61

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #38 on: December 05, 2010, 05:17:48 PM »

I remember doing "dipping lights" on my sailing training.  Due to the curvature of the earth, a light 2 miles away would have to be at a certain height to be seen.  I don't have the books that show how to work it out anymore though!  Doh!

This is why lighthouses etc have their height shown on charts so that sea farers can work out how far away they are.



There are so many variables with working out a distance off from a 'light', the height of the light gives a certain range it can be 'seen', the height of the observer gives a range he can 'see', obviously atmospherics play a large part too....so 'seeing a light is a guide....... the height of the light is more use for vertical sextant angles where there is a physical measurement....... sextant..... its in the box at the back of the chart table, under 5 years worth of accumulated rubbish and dust, and something these days guaranteed to clear a large number of people off any bridge should it be brought out!!
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farrow

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #39 on: December 08, 2010, 09:36:10 PM »

Hi Sailorboy, you forgot to mention to throw in the height of the Tide. Always guaranteed to get this question in your practical chart paper for the MCA.
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farrow

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #40 on: December 10, 2010, 08:23:42 PM »

In answer to Martins question, I always found that the easiest and safest way to work out if a risk of collision exists or if a vessel is being overtaken or a croosing situation exists was and still is to take bearings of a nav light.
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farrow

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2010, 10:29:46 PM »

Talking about regulation heights, I expect somone will correct me, but when I learn't the regs only the mast head/forward masthead light have to be certain distance from the deck and then the others a set distance apart from each other. The others have to be just clearly visible over thier arc from the vessel. Of course masthead signal lights have to be reg distance apart. So stern light any height as long as it is below the masthead light and clearly visible over it's arc.
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rathikrishna

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Re: tug towing lights
« Reply #42 on: December 13, 2010, 07:58:43 AM »

Good morning friends...and its awesome article...actually i was looking for a post like this as i am making one great TUG for me...i am too thank full to all informative people here....thanks once again...
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