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Author Topic: Gog position  (Read 5435 times)

captain ron

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Gog position
« on: October 30, 2010, 09:31:34 PM »

Hi guys,

Just want to confirm I've got this right......If I'm fitting the gog eye (fairlead) to my deck at the stern is the correct position slightly forward of my kort nozzle posts.
Would I line the gog eye up with say the back of the nozzle.
Is this the best position for tug towing.

Ron
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farrow

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2010, 10:13:37 PM »

What sort of tug have you modelled.
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captain ron

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2010, 10:51:03 PM »

Its a modern twin screw steerable korts with bow thruster.
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poll

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2010, 11:13:41 PM »

Hi captain ron, You could consider putting it like this, or why not make a working gog.

John
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captain ron

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2010, 11:36:20 PM »

Hi John,

Thanks for that and yes I will be fitting a working gog winch.

What I need to know is the best position to fit the U bracket at the stern to feed the gog rope throo.

Ron
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ministeve

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2010, 08:58:37 AM »

I allways fit it right on the rudder/Kort post line i do this at a cost the tug don't like going in a strait line easily but i can yank the Stern of the tug over a good deal without changing the tugs direction to much it sounds daft but it works for me.

steve
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CGAux26

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2010, 12:03:01 AM »

If you need to turn sharply with tension on the towline your U thingy needs to be well forward of the rudder post(s).  This allows the stern, where the steering happens to pivot freely.
What is a GOG?
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poll

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2010, 08:28:23 PM »

Hi Ron   This is a working gog on the portgarth, the winch is situated just under where the gog is.

John
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wilsonmu

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2010, 09:21:33 PM »

Hi Ron

The whole purpose of a bridle( Gog rope) is 1. To prevent the tug being haughed or capsized when stern on to a moving tow. 2 To allow the tug to turn by letting out the bridle rope you allow the tug to pivot further forward on the towing point. Modern tugs with powerful bow thrusters can force themselves round even with the tow line pulled right down to the eye but older tugs without bow thrusters cannot turn unless the bridle rope is let out first.

Cheers Murray
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CGAux26

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2010, 12:37:37 AM »

Thanks, good explanation.  Now how is the gog line let out as the tug turns (on a real tug)?
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wilsonmu

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2010, 09:22:25 PM »

Hi CGAux26

On Clyde Tugs one end of the Bridle Rope (Gog) was secured to the starboard side aft bits (Bollards) then lead through the eye and up to a pulley  or shackle which runs on the towing junk. Then back down to the eye and horizontally to a vertical electric capstan directly behind the eye under the towing rail . Then about four turns round the capstan which is tended by a deckhand who controls the capstan and holds the loose end of the bridle (Gog) with the coil of rope beside him. The skipper controls the length of the bridle by a series of bell signals he operates from the bridge. When the skipper wants the tug to turn the bridle is let out to which ever side the tug is turning. The bridle is always kept under tension and not allowed to go slack in case it fouls. When the tug is stern on to the stern of the tow  the bridle is hauled as short as possible and for extended stern on operations is doubled up and secured to the port side after bits.

Murray Wilson
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Le Caux Deux

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2010, 05:35:10 PM »

On a model tug which is best a working winch or a Working gog or both, I can see the point of a working winch when towing to give yourself space to manoeuvre, isn't the gog just doing the same

Mike
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wilsonmu

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2010, 11:25:58 AM »

Hi

In effect no. A working winch will only increase or decrease the length of the towing line. It will not help a non bow thruster tug to turn. The purpose of the gog is to move the pivot point of the tug from the eye at the stern to the towing hook amidships thus allowing the stern to swing out to port or starboard.

Murray Wilson
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Le Caux Deux

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2010, 07:56:45 PM »

Does that mean that with a bow thruster the pivot point is midships anyway so one would assume that a model tug fitted with a bow thruster and a working winch would be the best combination or should we still have a working gog rope.

The reason for the original question was that I am about to seal down the decks on my model and after that installing anything below the deck will be difficult/impossible. I've installed the winch and bow thruster, and can get my head round that for a 6 channel radio but how would I control the gog rope when channel 6 appears only to offer on/off

Mike
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norry

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2010, 08:13:42 PM »

...Hi Le Caux Deux...

If you have the room in the hull, Fit a Working Gog Winch...

If you use a Sail Winch then you can use your current radio...The Sail Winch can be loaded so that it releases about 6 or 7 inches of line when switched off, Thus releasing the Gog...When switched on again it will pull the 6 or 7 inches of line back in thus pulling down the Gog...

I have used this method before and it does work...

...Best Regards...Norry...
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wilsonmu

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2010, 12:02:39 PM »

Hi Mike

Really no. If the towing rope is passing through a gog eye on the stern then that will be the pivot point. However if you have a bow thruster it should have the power to lift the bow to port or starboard when the tug is towing. Also if the tug is being pulled astern it will be safe as it cannot capsize. If a tug towing from its towing hook without a gog is pulled astern it will swing beam on to the tow and be capsized.

Murray Wilson
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Geoff Cropper

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Re: Gog position
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2010, 04:48:29 PM »

Hi,     I've never seen a tow rope passing THROUGH a gog iron.      This would restrict your turning ability a lot.      I've seen Rea's tugs with lengths of heavy chain shackled to it with the other end attached to the tow rope with a large bow shackle which allows it to slide.        Or an adjustable gog which has a rope shackled to the chain end which passes through the gog iron with rope turned up on a drum end or vertical capstan to allow the tow rope to be veered out as required.      I would say the gog iron is always positioned ahead of the rudder post in conventional tugs where the tow hook is just aft of midships.             Kind regards,   Geoff.
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