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Author Topic: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial  (Read 138355 times)

essex2visuvesi

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #100 on: January 09, 2011, 03:44:39 PM »

I was talking to a friend of mine at my local hot-rod club who does a lot of airbrush work and asked him for any beginners suggestions and his was this

"Keep your airbrush clean.... clean it well and when you think its clean enough clean it again"

He suggests one of these:-
https://airbrushes.com/product_info.php?products_id=3144

Also available here
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/GX-Pro-Ultrasonic-Cleaner-VGT-2000-/250639606009?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a5b48e0f9
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #101 on: January 10, 2011, 12:27:38 AM »

Re: Cleaning your airbrush...

I've seen something somewhere called 'Airbrush Reamer'  - what's that all about?

Great tutorial John!
 Martin  :-)

PS found some Airbursh internal diagrams....



             


  Just back from a weekend in Buffalo.......PARTY TIME!! Was a great break. Now...back to business.

Martin:

  I've never used on of these reamers. They're for cleaning out hardened and chocked paint in the air brush. There is also a liquid version sold. If and when I get to the point that dry paint has to be removed I disassemble the unit and let the parts soak in lacquer thinner for a bit. It'll cut through just about anything. When the well soaked part is removed from the thinner blow the rubbish out with air blown through and around the parts. The trick is to not let it get his way. The best way to do that is make sure the brush is clean when you're done with it, and clean the pint out of it before it gets hard.

   I love the air brush internal diagrams. They're great for imaging what I was trying to explain in words.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #102 on: January 10, 2011, 12:46:08 AM »

can you please clarify what you mean by"fine" and "detailed" .
 just a little confused at what point detailed and fine begin, for example, weathering the hull and weathering winches,etc.
could both be done with an external brush or would winches etc, need an internal brush?

and.. is there any obvious ways of ascertaining whether an airbrush is ,...rubbish, for want of a better word.
Sticking to recognized and trusted brands is obviously safest but.....have been offered a couple of brushes,compressor,and associated items by someone,
who found them in the cellar of his new house.
do i turn my back on the opportunity ?  He,s no wiser than me and wants 40-50 pounds..
could be a steal .

cheers.. nige


  Difference between "fine" and "detailed" . "Fine" is close tolerance work. In painting that means narrow, controlled sprays, misting sprays with a fine particle output to lay on soft layers of colour without perceptible droplets. The paint layers can be be built up gradually with control over the translucence of the paint covering. This will allow dust, mud, and rust covering to appear gradual and almost see through depending on the degree of weathering or pain covering you want.
  "Detailed" is a along the same lines. You want to drop specific amounts of colour in a specific area on the model with great control.
 Both of these requirements can't be covered by an external mix brush. The paint droplets are too large for the application. Because of the inherent broad spray you don't have the control to give you the close control on narrow lines of paint, nor provide the  fine droplet paint needed for  small items, like winches. The external mix brush will do large areas (eg hulls) adequately. I wouldn't normally have both types of air brushes. The internal mix brush can do everything the external can do and vastly more and many, many times better.

  As to the used air brush compressor, without knowing the brand, the only way to tell if the brush will do what you want it to do is try it. Otherwise, if the brush seems to be made in a quality way (fit, finish and material) you are probably on your way to getting a decent item, but not guaranteed. Also, can you get parts for it if you don't know who the manufacturer is?

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #103 on: January 10, 2011, 12:52:23 AM »

I have picked up one of these
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/MINI-BABY-ELEPHANT-COMPRESSOR-AIRBRUSH-NAIL-ART-/260709521107?pt=UK_Crafts_DrawingSupplies_EH&hash=item3cb37f96d3

I already have a water trap/filter and some mid range airbrushes so I think it should be OK
When it arrives Ill post a quick write up if anyone is interested


I do already have a very nice big compressor for my big spray guns/tools etc but as I like to work in the evening after the kids are in bed its not really suitable as its a bit noisy (actually a lot noisy)  <:(

  I trust you noticed the qualifier on the advert "only suitable for gravity feed or side delivery feed air brushes" This is because the air pressure and volume requirement is lower  than for a bottom feed air brush.
  Let us know how you make out.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #104 on: January 10, 2011, 12:56:12 AM »

I was talking to a friend of mine at my local hot-rod club who does a lot of airbrush work and asked him for any beginners suggestions and his was this

"Keep your airbrush clean.... clean it well and when you think its clean enough clean it again"

He suggests one of these:-
https://airbrushes.com/product_info.php?products_id=3144

Also available here
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/GX-Pro-Ultrasonic-Cleaner-VGT-2000-/250639606009?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a5b48e0f9


  Your friend is quite right, cleanliness is next to Godliness in this work. I have a similar cleaner to what you have shown. Although I haven't used mine for cleaning air brushes I don't see why it couldn't work. Just remember the cleaners work at a very high frequency vibration. Don't leave parts together that may vibrate together and cause damage in critical areas, such as the needle inside the head.

John
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #105 on: January 10, 2011, 02:19:45 PM »

  I trust you noticed the qualifier on the advert "only suitable for gravity feed or side delivery feed air brushes" This is because the air pressure and volume requirement is lower  than for a bottom feed air brush.
  Let us know how you make out.

John


Yes I did... I only have gravity fed airbrushes
Thisi type
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nige2307

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #106 on: January 10, 2011, 03:30:22 PM »

 Difference between "fine" and "detailed" . "Fine" is close tolerance work. In painting that means narrow, controlled sprays, misting sprays with a fine particle output to lay on soft layers of colour without perceptible droplets. The paint layers can be be built up gradually with control over the translucence of the paint covering. This will allow dust, mud, and rust covering to appear gradual and almost see through depending on the degree of weathering or pain covering you want.
  "Detailed" is a along the same lines. You want to drop specific amounts of colour in a specific area on the model with great control.
 Both of these requirements can't be covered by an external mix brush. The paint droplets are too large for the application. Because of the inherent broad spray you don't have the control to give you the close control on narrow lines of paint, nor provide the  fine droplet paint needed for  small items, like winches. The external mix brush will do large areas (eg hulls) adequately. I wouldn't normally have both types of air brushes. The internal mix brush can do everything the external can do and vastly more and many, many times better.

  As to the used air brush compressor, without knowing the brand, the only way to tell if the brush will do what you want it to do is try it. Otherwise, if the brush seems to be made in a quality way (fit, finish and material) you are probably on your way to getting a decent item, but not guaranteed. Also, can you get parts for it if you don't know who the manufacturer is?

John


thank you
was  helpful
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #107 on: January 10, 2011, 04:44:31 PM »

Also something else to bear in mind is personal tastes/preference

What I use is possibly different to OldIron and others on here.  What we find to be nice comfortable brush may not fit as well in your hand and be uncomfortable to use.  That's not to say what any of us are using are wrong... just different
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #108 on: January 10, 2011, 07:24:42 PM »

Also something else to bear in mind is personal tastes/preference

What I use is possibly different to OldIron and others on here.  What we find to be nice comfortable brush may not fit as well in your hand and be uncomfortable to use.  That's not to say what any of us are using are wrong... just different

 I quite agree. We will all have our own style. Go with what works for you.

John
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tt1

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #109 on: January 11, 2011, 02:07:09 AM »

Hello again John, your reply No.102 has certainly expanded on and clarified my thoughts re my earlier question of achieving satisfactory results with my external mix brush.
       As a beginner to modelling in its entirety, I tend to spray all my 'bits' prior to assembly and so therefore am not (yet!) weathering or trying to pick out fine detail on ready assembled parts or structures.  Perhaps wrongly, I envisaged using the brush as a good quality spray gun, if that makes sense. I did actually Spray the hull of my loyal class build with this brush with reasonably pleasing results, but would generally want to limit its use to the smaller single colour structures or parts.
       Anyway sorry for interrupting!  Am really looking forward to more words of wisdom - this really is a great topic,  :-))

                                                   kind regards, Tony.
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #110 on: January 11, 2011, 03:15:01 AM »

Hello again John, your reply No.102 has certainly expanded on and clarified my thoughts re my earlier question of achieving satisfactory results with my external mix brush.
       As a beginner to modelling in its entirety, I tend to spray all my 'bits' prior to assembly and so therefore am not (yet!) weathering or trying to pick out fine detail on ready assembled parts or structures.  Perhaps wrongly, I envisaged using the brush as a good quality spray gun, if that makes sense. I did actually Spray the hull of my loyal class build with this brush with reasonably pleasing results, but would generally want to limit its use to the smaller single colour structures or parts.
       Anyway sorry for interrupting!  Am really looking forward to more words of wisdom - this really is a great topic,  :-))

                                                   kind regards, Tony.

 Tony:
  I'm glad you're enjoying the topic, thanks very much.
  I think you've experienced what I've been trying to say relative to external mix brushes. They're fine for what you've described, but can't adequately do the fancy bits. Sort of like using a sledge hammer to drive a nail in fine furniture............the nail will go in, but with more side effects than would be desired.
  More tomorrow.

John
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tt1

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #111 on: January 11, 2011, 11:01:16 AM »

Cheers John, what an apt analogy.  O0
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #112 on: January 12, 2011, 01:08:30 AM »

AIR SOURCES FOR AIR BRUSHING

 
We now come to, what may see, the easy part of the whole air brushing operation….air supply. As has been seen in our discussion to this point there have been a few questions in this area. Anything from the amount and pressure required to the noise level of the compressors.
  The most obvious requirements for our air brush are constant air at a pressure required by our type of brush, and free of water and oil. We will look at each of these requirements relative to the supply options we have.
  The compressors typically marketed by air brush outfits such as Badger, Paasche, De Vilbiss are a diaphragm type of construction. These fit the requirement of oil free, but can produce a pulsating air flow due to the up and down movement of the diaphragm. This pulsating movement can upset the output of the airbrush by not giving a smooth even coat. In most cases this won’t be noticed when heavier coating applications are involved, however, if you are doing layers of paint in the light misting category the effects of the pulsating may be seen in an uneven application of paint. Although this may be minimal, it will be present. To what degree that bothers you will determine how you want to correct it.
  From the producers standpoint these compressors are cheap and easy to build, light weight, oil free and the pulsating effects won’t be noticed by the majority of the consumers. We can get around this by introducing something as simple as a moisture trap. The volume of air in the trap and restriction of the air passing through it will smooth out the pulsations. Fortunately this is an item we need in our air supply. More on that later.
  One may consider other compressor options; however, you need air free of oil. Oil will give the same effect as moisture in the air except it won’t dry ad will contaminate your clean prepared surface. Either an oil separator (extra cost) is required, or you need a compressor that doesn’t use oil in the piston area. The photos show two other compressors. The red one produces air pressures up to 125 psig, as will the blue one Mastercraft job. Both supply adequate quantities of air and both have air receivers to reduce the start/stop cycle of the compressor. All plus points, however, the red compressor is oil lubricated, something we don’t want to get into for our application. In this case a type similar to the Mastercraft job can be worthwhile. It has the advantage of doing other small jobs around your shop since it is equipped with a pressure regulator.




Typical oil less diaphragm compressor



Oil lubricated compressor with receiver



oil free compressor with air receiver

  Another air supply possibility is a portable air tank, or as we call them here, an air “pig”. This particular one is a 2 gallon size, but other sizes are available. It can be pumped up to 125 psig. The tank is taken to a local air source such as the tire compressor at your local auto service center, filled and taken home. Put a regulator in the outlet and connect your favourite air hose. No sound, no moisture worries, and most likely no oil worries. Not a bad way to go. How long will it last? Depends on how much you spray, but I expect it would have no problem doing a boat. After all, if you pump it to 125 psig you can draw it down to 20psig or less. Plus it’s inexpensive. Some have suggested using a tire. You can do, except you may only get 40 psig in it and its awfully heavy and cumbersome to haul around. The tank has the benefit of light weight and a handle.



Portable air tank

  We talked of moisture traps. These are a necessity in virtually all our air brush painting. When we compress air the amount of moisture in a cubic foot of air becomes denser when subject to higher pressures. The dew point of that dense moist air can often be low enough, at room temperature, to allow that moisture to condense out of the air. This results in droplets of moisture being carried into the air stream and into our paint and onto our work. When you look at your work, you will think you’ve got large droplets of paint coming from the brush, when in fact its paint floating on drops of moisture. You may hear a sputter from the brush when this happens. As the paint dries and the moisture evaporates we are left with “fish eyes” on our work resulting in more sanding and respraying. The moisture effect is much more pronounced on hot humid days and lesser so on dry cold winter days.
  To over come this one can purchase a commercial moisture separator /filter combination that will work very will. For those who like to improvise, such as myself, you can make your own. You can see mine in the photos. Its an arbitrary length of 1 ½” dia. ABS plumbing pipe (because I had some scraps on hand). I glued caps on each end. (see pictures) The bottom one I installed a screw in cap because I thought I may have to drain the moisture build up. I have never had to up to this point. You put your air supply in the bottom and take your brush supply off the top. Since I use the diaphragm type compressor this acts to mediate the pulsations from the compressor and it serves to entrap moisture that precipitates out of the air as the air expands through the tube.  Since I made it up thirty years ago I’ve never had a moisture problem no matter how humid the air gets, and it can get very humid here in the summer.




 ABS moisture trap mounted on the side of my spray booth

  Speaking of the air coming from the trap, what type of air hose are you using? Most air brush kits come with a heavy braided hose. A good rugged hose, but heavy and stiff when you want something that is light and flexible to feed your brush. I use the light plastic hose that comes with some brushes or can be purchased as an accessory. It is light weight, very flexible and, I find, excellent for bringing air to the brush and giving minimum resistance to movement when painting. (see picture).



A comparison between the braided and light plastic hose.


Anti vibration material

As a side note, some have been concerned about noise from the compressors, a valid point. Even the little diaphragm compressors can do quite a dance when operating. Here’s a tip. I usually try and use stuff before it gets thrown out. I found a couple of tubes of silicone sealant had hardened from lack of use. The first instinct is to chuck them out. Hmm I thought, I wonder what its like if I cut the cardboard/plastic tube off them and see what the contents is like. The result is in the photo. I had couple of sticks of rubbery firm silicone sealant. The blue stick is much stiffer than the white stick. I have a pedestal grinder sitting on the basement floor. Every time I run it, it vibrates and meanders across the floor. I cut off a four disks of the white material and put one puck under each corner of the pedestal. Instant silence and no more wandering, works great. You may want to try something similar with your air compressors.




Rubbery silicone sealing sticks removed from dispensing tubes.



Silicone puck under corner of pedestal grinder.

That about does it for now.

John
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wibplus

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #113 on: January 12, 2011, 05:26:18 PM »

Brilliant stuff.   :-))  :-))

Very well explained, even to a numpty like me.   ok2 ok2
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RaaArtyGunner

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #114 on: January 12, 2011, 08:18:35 PM »

John,

Good tip about the silicone, always gets thrown out.

 :-)) :-)) :-))
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rathikrishna

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #115 on: January 13, 2011, 12:11:03 PM »

Oh my god..it was a great topic lokking for...thanks for the great advices...
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #116 on: January 13, 2011, 12:56:09 PM »

  Glad I could help out.

John
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davidm1945

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #117 on: January 20, 2011, 05:11:10 PM »

Hi All,
   Some of you will remember that I asked if anyone owned or had used one of the many airbrush kits available on ebay. Nobody seemed to be able to give me any info on quality, noise etc so I "bit the bullet" and went ahead and bought this one:-

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/AIRBRUSH-KIT-AIRBRUSH-COMPRESSOR-AIR-BRUSH-COMPRESSOR-/370455752491?pt=UK_Health_Beauty_Tattoos_BodyArt_SM&hash=item5640e22f2b

Delivery was very quick - within 3 days and when I unpacked the units I was very pleased with the quality of both the airbrush and the compressor. I have given it a quick trial run and find that the compressor is surprisingly quiet and the airbrush seems easy to use and gives a good finish.

I will be able to tell you more after I have used it a bit more seriously but so far I am very impressed.

Dave
                         
                   

.
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #118 on: January 20, 2011, 05:59:08 PM »

Hi All,
   Some of you will remember that I asked if anyone owned or had used one of the many airbrush kits available on ebay. Nobody seemed to be able to give me any info on quality, noise etc so I "bit the bullet" and went ahead and bought this one:-

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/AIRBRUSH-KIT-AIRBRUSH-COMPRESSOR-AIR-BRUSH-COMPRESSOR-/370455752491?pt=UK_Health_Beauty_Tattoos_BodyArt_SM&hash=item5640e22f2b

Delivery was very quick - within 3 days and when I unpacked the units I was very pleased with the quality of both the airbrush and the compressor. I have given it a quick trial run and find that the compressor is surprisingly quiet and the airbrush seems easy to use and gives a good finish.

I will be able to tell you more after I have used it a bit more seriously but so far I am very impressed.

Dave
                         
                   

.

  That's good news. Something to add to our repertoire. Thanks for the feedback.

John
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Peter Fitness

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #119 on: January 20, 2011, 08:53:48 PM »

John, have you had any experience of the airbrushes here? http://www.hobbycity.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=9294

I bought one a few months ago and it seems first class. Being twin action it gives excellent control over paint flow, and is capable of quite fine work. The price, even allowing for freight, is ridiculously low, and the build quality, to my untrained eye, seems very good. You do need your own compressor, though.

Peter.
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essex2visuvesi

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #120 on: January 21, 2011, 08:11:28 AM »

Same place as I got one of mine from

Works very well for the price
The seller is good as well. I buy many RC parts from there and delivery to Finland is normally just over a week
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #121 on: January 21, 2011, 09:21:11 AM »

John, have you had any experience of the airbrushes here? http://www.hobbycity.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=9294

I bought one a few months ago and it seems first class. Being twin action it gives excellent control over paint flow, and is capable of quite fine work. The price, even allowing for freight, is ridiculously low, and the build quality, to my untrained eye, seems very good. You do need your own compressor, though.

Peter.

 Peter:

 I can't comment on that specific manufacturer of brush, but it certainly looks good.
 I see you've had an answer from someone else with experience with that brush. Sounds good.

John
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #122 on: January 21, 2011, 07:58:09 PM »

If you're looking for a cheap airbrush set, this looks like good value:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Airbrush-Kit-Airbrush-Compressor-/190492702529?pt=UK_Crafts_DrawingSupplies_EH&hash=item2c5a3ff741

Including the postage, the total cost is £55 for a compressor, a pair of brushes and a hose. It's actually quite hard to find a hose for less than £10, and if we allow £10 for each airbrush, the compressor is £25.

Don't tell them I sent you, or they'll put the price up.... %% %% %%
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #123 on: January 21, 2011, 08:36:36 PM »

Lottsa good deals goin down.

John
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rathikrishna

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #124 on: January 22, 2011, 05:35:34 AM »

thanks for the discussions...got even more knowledge...
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