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Author Topic: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial  (Read 138412 times)

RantandRave

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #50 on: December 31, 2010, 11:15:18 AM »

I picked up this leaflet at HobbyCraft the other day......   %)







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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #51 on: December 31, 2010, 11:55:16 AM »

I picked up this leaflet at HobbyCraft the other day......   %)


  Guess you saved me a lot of writing.

John
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chingdevil

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #52 on: January 01, 2011, 12:39:19 PM »

John what a brilliant thread already.

I have spoken to Martin about this, I am going to compile this thread into a hard copy for reference in my shed, would any other members like a copy of this when I have completed it. It will be complete with all the questions, answers and images that are posted, It will also be in PDF format so will be easy to e-mail.

Send me a PM if anyone is interested


Brian
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #53 on: January 02, 2011, 03:17:47 PM »

AIR BRUSH PAINT RECEPTACLES

  Now that weíve covered the basic types of air brushes, we need to look at a method of making the paint available for the use by the air brush. The two most common methods are via an under hung bottle or a cup. The cup may be under hung, side slung, or over head for gravity feed.   
  To begin with, why use a cup or a bottle? The bottle is used where large areas of the same colour are to be painted. Obviously because of their size, bottles carry a relatively large amount of paint. This allows you to cover a large area with one coat, or a smaller area with multiple coats, without refilling the bottle. Also, these areas can be covered more quickly than with a gravity feed cup.
  The down side for a bottle, in some applications, is the size. If you are only doing a small amount of a single colour, or using that colour sparingly, the bottle may be too much for your needs. This is the case when doing art graphics with an airbrush. Artists painting pictures with an air brush arenít going to use the same quantity of the same colour as, say, someone painting the hull of a large vessel. For the vessel, the large bottle works well whereas the cup would rapidly need refilling just as you are getting into the swing of the painting (no pun intended). One thing to keep in mind with the bottle, it has a small hole in its lid (something around .060Ē dia). Ensure this hole is open and clear. Failure to do so will mean erratic paint application as the air brush will draw a vacuum on the jar preventing paint rising to the brush. Obviously open cup arrangements donít have this problem.
  Another difference not often considered is the mass weight of the paint receptacle on the air brush. The bottle filled with paint imparts a weight mass to the brush that can be somewhat awkward to control when painting very fine areas. A paint bottle is not the best attachment when airbrushing lines for example. One needs a steady hand with as light a unit as possible. Here the cup excels.
 As well as mass, the paint bottle has the down side of being large. If youíre tying to get into a small area there is obviously a restriction with the paint bottle. That being the paint bottle can get in the way when trying to get the air brush into a tight spot.
 An upside to the paint bottle, as well as the volume of paint available, is the fact the top of the bottle is covered. Many of the paint cups on air brushes arenít. Tip the air brush from any position but vertical and you wear your current choice of paint, or worse yet, your project does. Some cups have covers on them. I have a De Villbis that has a covered cup, however, most donít. The bottle is much more forgiving in this area.
  As I mentioned earlier, cups can be made to interchange with bottles, some cups are permanently mounted to the air brush, some are on the bottom, some on the side and some on the top so the paint gravity feeds to the air brush. Whatís the difference?
  
BOTTOM FEED refers to airbrushes on which material enters through a siphon tube or colour cup attached to the bottom of the air brush. This type of air brush should have at least 18 PSI while spraying to operate properly.
GRAVITY FEED refers to air brushes on which material enters at the top of the airbrush through a top-mounted colour reservoir. Gravity draws the material into the air brush. This type of air brush can be operated at spray pressures as low as 8 PSI. Gravity feeds are the best for detail work. Because of the lower pressures and they are ideally suited to fine detail work
SIDE FEED refers to air brushes on which material enters at the side of the air brush through a side attached color reservoir. This type of air brush operates best at approximately 12 PSI. The side feed also allows the cup to be swung for and aft in an arc to allow for variations in brush position while painting. (ref. Badger Airbrush Co.)

  For me, the bottom feed from a bottle works well for my general use. That said I can certainly see benefit to the use of a paint cup when doing fine weathering work with an air brush. The control of a gravity feed is best in this case. However, since most of us donít want to buy more than one air brush, consider getting an air brush that you can change from a bottle to a cup readily. This gets the best of both worlds with the minimum of cost.

John




 Side mount open cup air brush




 Permanently attached closed cup (cap on it) gravity feed air brush. Ideal for graphic arts




  The familiar bottle for the underfeed, bottle fed air brush.




  Air brush with bottle attached. This bottle and fitting can be slipped out of the air brush and a cup put in its place on this particular model
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nige2307

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #54 on: January 03, 2011, 11:25:34 PM »

A much appreciated and informative tutorial  :-))
Regarding the 3 types of airbrush you mentioned ,of the 3 which is the most versatile and best suited to all round abilities ? and are all types equally proficient with the different mediums available for spraying?
 you mentioned the psi needs of the different types,  do the internal/external ones also have different operating pressures, and all types suitable for canned air until funds permit buying a compressor . 
 If possible can you also include, where applicable, examples @ approximate prices ?
 would like to get one brush that fits all needs for all people all the time... and cheap!!..YEAH RIGHT!!
 I  as will countless others, now and in years to come..... THANK YOU.
  ......NIGEL....
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #55 on: January 03, 2011, 11:53:04 PM »

A much appreciated and informative tutorial  :-))
Regarding the 3 types of airbrush you mentioned ,of the 3 which is the most versatile and best suited to all round abilities ? and are all types equally proficient with the different mediums available for spraying?
 you mentioned the psi needs of the different types,  do the internal/external ones also have different operating pressures, and all types suitable for canned air until funds permit buying a compressor .  
 If possible can you also include, where applicable, examples @ approximate prices ?
 would like to get one brush that fits all needs for all people all the time... and cheap!!..YEAH RIGHT!!
 I  as will countless others, now and in years to come..... THANK YOU.
  ......NIGEL....

 Nigel:

  to try an answer your questions:
1) For what we do in marine modeling, I feel the single action, internal mixing, bottle fed air brush is the most versatile. I've used it for covering large and small areas, weathering, shading and so forth. The later items are probably done better with a double action air brush, but the single action works best over all.
2) I have found the external mix brush, such as the 250 I've shown, work best on more air pressure, say about 20 PSI. This can be confirmed with type of paint and the degree of thinning. It does give you a starting point though. Yes, all forms of these air brushes can be used with canned air, which is very expensive in the long run anyway.
3) Since you live in the UK and I in Canada there may not be much value in me quoting prices of air brushes. I've seen significant price variations on many things from one side of the pond to the other.

John
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nige2307

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #56 on: January 04, 2011, 12:43:32 AM »

I guess you wont know where i can get one in LEEDS then ?  :embarrassed:
 
can you advise on brand/model?

(CANADA!!  thats not near here...is it?)   
  thanks again.
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #57 on: January 04, 2011, 01:44:44 AM »

I guess you wont know where i can get one in LEEDS then ? 


I have bought a few off ebay.uk - and these people are quite cheap - http://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/AIR_BRUSHES_.html

I have a query about an airbrush item that oldiron may be able to answer - it concerns a small cup provided with my bottle-fed brush. The cup is a small metal one with an angled feed pipe - shown here:



If I were to use it for normal airbrushing, the angled feed pipe would mean that the paint would all spill out. The only way I could use it is if I were airbrushing vertically upwards - like this:



But in practice the bottle feed will work at this angle as well - so I can see no obvious need for a separate 'vertical' cup. However it seems to be a common accessory for bottle-fed brushes. Am I right in thinking that it is a 'vertical spraying' accessory, and, if so, why only for bottle-fed brushes?

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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #58 on: January 04, 2011, 03:16:28 AM »

I guess you wont know where i can get one in LEEDS then ?  :embarrassed:
 
can you advise on brand/model?

(CANADA!!  thats not near here...is it?)   
  thanks again.


 As I mentioned earlier I prefer the Badger 200. Its a single action brush that can take a cup or a bottle, parts are readily available, you can readily fit it with fine, medium or heavy needles that cover most of your spraying needs. Its a good quality, all metal rugged brush that will shoot just about anything.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #59 on: January 04, 2011, 03:29:53 AM »


I have bought a few off ebay.uk - and these people are quite cheap - http://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/AIR_BRUSHES_.html

I have a query about an airbrush item that oldiron may be able to answer - it concerns a small cup provided with my bottle-fed brush. The cup is a small metal one with an angled feed pipe - shown here:


If I were to use it for normal airbrushing, the angled feed pipe would mean that the paint would all spill out. The only way I could use it is if I were airbrushing vertically upwards - like this:


But in practice the bottle feed will work at this angle as well - so I can see no obvious need for a separate 'vertical' cup. However it seems to be a common accessory for bottle-fed brushes. Am I right in thinking that it is a 'vertical spraying' accessory, and, if so, why only for bottle-fed brushes?



  Doggy:

  You're quite correct in the cup being a more or less vertical alignment tool for all the reasons you've mentioned. The brush you have has the ability to take a bottle or a cup. The bottle fitting plugs into the brush just as your cup does. Since the cup design is primarily designed for graphic arts and the like, most of their work is on a vertical surface, being set on an easel or something similar. In that case the cup has a certain minor adjustment to allow its use in that position. However, when we paint our models we are moving the brush in all sorts of directions that will usually end up emptying the cup before we want it to. Since your brush is a double action brush (and good one by the looks of it) the brush was more directed to the graphics arts cutomer as opposed to the model builder, hence the application of the cup as standard issue for that application. May I suggest investing in a bottle and fitting to go into your brush. You'll find it much more useful for model work.  
  You mention only for bottle fed brushes. This is because there is no bottle application for gravity feed brushes, only cup feed. Most of those have the cups permanently installed. At least the underfeed type (which you have) allows us to use either a cup or a bottle.

John
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #60 on: January 04, 2011, 02:02:21 PM »

 Doggy:

Woof, Woof....

May I suggest investing in a bottle and fitting to go into your brush. You'll find it much more useful for model work.  

Yes, the airbrush shown came with a bottle fitting as well. I just didn't show it...

Thanks for the info. In practice I find that the bottle works well vertically if it is fairly full, so I never use the cup, and wondered why it semed to be a standard feature of all underfeed bottle brushes.

For modeling I find a bottle to be very useful, since we are likely to use our airbrushes as sprayguns as well as detail painters, and you really need a lot of paint for a hull. I also find the underfeed models to be a bit cumbersome to hold - Everythingairbrush in the UK do a side-feed bottle model which looks more practical - the AB-133 here: http://www.everythingairbrush.com/acatalog/Suction_Feed.html 
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Martin [Admin]

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #61 on: January 04, 2011, 03:58:01 PM »

Topic renamed.    :-))
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #63 on: January 04, 2011, 04:50:06 PM »

How does this kit look oldiron?  £70 GBP

It looks like £79.50, as I said here: http://www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=28105.msg276398#msg276398


"Buy it from their own website rather than ebay. It's £79.50 from ebay, and £74.03 from their site here:

http://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/AIRBRUSH_KITS_AND_SPARES.html "

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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #64 on: January 04, 2011, 06:31:28 PM »

How does this kit look oldiron?  £70 GBP



 Martin:
 That kit looks pretty good from what i tell in the photos. Use will be the final determining factor. I see they're double action brushes. The large removable side cup is nice, particularity as commented by Dodgy Geezer ("Doggy" sorry about that, I should proof read better). I like that fact the brush with the bottle has a stop limiter on the air/paint control This can turn your double action into a single action through adjustment of the stop. Makes it great for covering large surfaces, like hull, with a minimum of control effort.
 Looks like a good deal to me. Just be sure you can get parts and different tip sizes for them. You'll find that'll pay dividends the more you use it.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #65 on: January 04, 2011, 06:32:54 PM »

Woof, Woof....


  Dodgy:

  Sorry about that. I'll check what I've written more closely next time.

John
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oldiron

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #66 on: January 04, 2011, 06:36:18 PM »


For modeling I find a bottle to be very useful, since we are likely to use our airbrushes as sprayguns as well as detail painters, and you really need a lot of paint for a hull. I also find the underfeed models to be a bit cumbersome to hold - Everythingairbrush in the UK do a side-feed bottle model which looks more practical - the AB-133 here: http://www.everythingairbrush.com/acatalog/Suction_Feed.html 

  I agree with your observation. As I mentioned in one of the earlier entries, the weight of the bottle and the paint in it can be a bit of a drag, especially when doing fine detail work. The larger side cup can be a benefit.

John
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #67 on: January 04, 2011, 07:21:07 PM »

I'll check what I've written...

No issue - I just couldn't resist.. :} :} :}
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davidm1945

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #68 on: January 05, 2011, 12:44:34 PM »

Hi All,
   I'm in the market for a new airbrush - using a very basic one with aerosol propellant at the moment.

I saw this on ebay and it looks too good to be true. The seller has 100% fedback which is reassuring but my Dad always said "if lt looks to good to be true it probably is!"

Any comments would be much appreciated.....

Many thanks,

         Dave

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/AIRBRUSH-KIT-AIRBRUSH-COMPRESSOR-AIR-BRUSH-COMPRESSOR-/370268372610?pt=UK_Crafts_DrawingSupplies_EH&hash=item5635b6fe82
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davidm1945

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #69 on: January 05, 2011, 12:57:26 PM »

Hi All,
   I've just spotted similar posts on oldiron's airbrush tutorial but would still like to know:-

   What is the quality like, say in comparison to Badger?
   How noisy is the compressor?
   Any other comments...


Again many thanks,

        Dave
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nhp651

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #70 on: January 05, 2011, 01:19:24 PM »

I have a similar one made by Badger, plus compresser similar to that in the add..... had it for about 10 years...................never use it. too much of a farse cleaning it out every time I want to change colours, so it sits in a corner collecting dust.............I find it easier using aerosols from such places as Halfords. :(( :(( :((
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davidm1945

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #71 on: January 05, 2011, 01:51:41 PM »

Apologies to you oldiron, I deliberately didn't post my above query on to your air brush tutorial as I didn't want to disrupt the flow of your posts. However a moderator has seen fit to move it here so I hope it won't detract from your fine masterclass which I am enjoying very much.

Apologies again, not my fault,

All the best.
       
      Dave
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6705russell

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #72 on: January 05, 2011, 01:52:32 PM »

I have a similar one made by Badger, plus compresser similar to that in the add..... had it for about 10 years...................never use it. too much of a farse cleaning it out every time I want to change colours, so it sits in a corner collecting dust.............I find it easier using aerosols from such places as Halfords. :(( :(( :((

I have been after a cheap airbrush and compressor!!   ok2
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dodgy geezer

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #73 on: January 05, 2011, 03:47:53 PM »

I have been after a cheap airbrush and compressor!! 

For the UK, I think that two good places to look for cheap airbrushes are:


http://www.everythingairbrush.co.uk/

http://www.rdgtools.co.uk/acatalog/AIR_BRUSHES_AND_COMPRESSORS.html


but just after VAT has gone up to 20% is the wrong time to be looking for cheap items of any kind.... <:( <:(
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Double D

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Re: Oldiron's Airbrush Tutorial
« Reply #74 on: January 05, 2011, 04:56:32 PM »

I have been after a cheap airbrush and compressor!!   ok2
Dave's got one he never uses (air brush and compressor that is).  You can just borrow that then don't bother givin it back.  Kills two birds with one stone ...... you get the airbrush and I make some room in the kitchen, and if we both deny all knowledge he'll just think it's in the shed  :}
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