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Author Topic: 6v surface mounted switch  (Read 1772 times)

AIH

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6v surface mounted switch
« on: January 30, 2011, 11:18:33 AM »



I am in the process of putting the final touches, ie, electrics for lighting on this "Sea Queen" model, and am having trouble finding a supplier for a 6v surface mounted switch. Can anyone help?
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barriew

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2011, 12:04:35 PM »

Its not the voltage you need to worry about - its the current that your motor is going to draw :-)) Take a look at Action - they do switches to carry model boat type currents, or Halfords for Car Accessory switches - 12 volt switches are OK on 6volt - if the current rating is high enough.

Barrie
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dodgy geezer

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2011, 12:06:53 PM »


Can you describe what you mean by a 'surface-mounted switch'?

It is easy to source slide switches from Maplins if these are what you mean... http://www.maplin.co.uk/components/switches/slide-switches 

(You have not included your location in your profile, so I don't know if you are in the UK or elsewhere.)
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john44

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2011, 12:11:12 PM »

If it is the reciever supply you want to control a slide switch would suffice.


John
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andyn

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2011, 12:12:16 PM »

A surface mount switch would be one of these: http://www.rapidonline.com/Electronic-Components/Switches/Slide-Switches/Ultraminiature-slide-switch/60329/kw/surface+mount+switch

If you want some, pm your address and I'll put some in the post. Alternatively I have a 8 switch DIL you can have if thats more suitable?

Good job one of us around here knows what surface mount is....

Andy.
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Circlip

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2011, 01:59:57 PM »

Quote
Good job one of us around here knows what surface mount is....


 Not quite Glasshopper, you have indicated a PCB mounted switch, NOT surface or SM switch. Perhaps the OP wants a slide operated type as opposed to a Toggle type.

  Regards  Ian.
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Netleyned

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2011, 02:42:09 PM »

A surface mount switch or any surface mount component is so called because it is mounted on the surface of a double sided pcb (Surface mount Technology)
A pcb mounted switch will be mounted through the pcb holes (Through hole Technology)
AIH needs an on/off switch for his lights so probably a hidden slide switch is what he is looking for and was just unfortunate with his description.

Ned
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dodgy geezer

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2011, 03:41:24 PM »

Speaking for myself, the only 'surface-mounted' switch I know is usually called a DIP switch (and even those are often actually provided with through-hole pins). Which is why I asked if that was really what was meant, and suggested that he might be looking for a flat slide switch, as opposed to the usual deep-body toggle....
 
But most types are available from any component store - perhaps if we wait to find out what the original poster's requirement is? Maybe he wants a DIP switch which could be mounted directly on a model dashboard....?
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Circlip

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2011, 05:44:27 PM »

Surface mounting switches :-  http://www.e-switch.com/entity/tabid/95/entityname/section/sectionid/8/sename/surface-mount/default.aspx

 Regards  Ian.

 Are these the ones required :- http://www.proopsbrothers.com/acatalog/Online_Catalogue_Switches_19.html

  (Scroll down)
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malcolmfrary

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Re: 6v surface mounted switch
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2011, 11:49:35 AM »

"Surface Mounting" in today's terms usually implies mounting to the copper side of a PCB, which has been a way of miniaturising components and circuit boards.  Switches mounted that way, by their nature, must be small with very little operating force and therefore with very little current carrying ability.  Through hole switches can be much larger, and are often variations on panel mount types, but with pins instead of lugs to simplify wiring.
Most switches are panel mounting, either poked through a round hole and held by a knurled knut (typical toggle lever switch and the "push-push" type found on table lamps), poked through a rectangular hole and retained by sprung ears moulded into the switch body (rocker switch as found on car dashboards), or they have a flat face panel with a lug at each end for fixing screws (RX slider switch).  This last can be dropped in through the front surface or fixed from behind with or without a fascia plate, as is usually the case with the RX switches, which effectively are clamped in their own small enclosure.
Like various posters have said, pretty much any switch will handle 6 volts, the critical consideration is how much current the lighting will take, generally, the bigger the current, the bigger the switch, the more force needed to operate it and the stronger the structure it needs to be mounted on.  Unless the contacts are a bit exotic, like having a gold or platinum flashing on the contacts.
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