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Author Topic: solvents  (Read 6049 times)

hopeitfloats

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solvents
« on: February 11, 2011, 07:56:55 AM »

i just brought a spray gun and it says in the instructions not to use with homogenate hydrocarbon solvents. could someone please tell me what that is.
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oldiron

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Re: solvents
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2011, 08:34:48 AM »

  After a little Google searching I found these type of solvents are detrimental to aluminum and zinc derivative parts and castings. This type of solvent shows up as the following homogenate hydrocarbon solvents:
- Methyl chloride
- Dichloromethane
- 1.2 - dichloromethane
- Carbon tetrachloride
- Trichloethylene
- 1.1.1 - trichloroethane

John
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derekwarner

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Re: solvents
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2011, 08:54:05 AM »

yes you are correct oldiron  :-)) .....but just imagine what they do to our health....& I am not living in a nanny state of mind..... >>:-( ....

The issue you justly raise is the use of these chemicals is when combined with inadaquate ventilitation ...... Derek
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Derek Warner

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Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
Australia
www.ils.org.au

oldiron

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Re: solvents
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2011, 02:08:12 PM »

yes you are correct oldiron  :-)) .....but just imagine what they do to our health....& I am not living in a nanny state of mind..... >>:-( ....

The issue you justly raise is the use of these chemicals is when combined with inadaquate ventilitation ...... Derek

  Derek
  I agree. The thoughts of "give me fresh air" really jump to mind. Like you, I despise a nanny state, but there comes a time when self preservation takes hold.

John
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ministeve

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Re: solvents
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2011, 06:41:46 PM »

we used to use carbon tet in a liquid called spotting solvent was great for cleaning glue off the side of vans after removing lettering. i used to soak paper towels in it then rub on the van till all glue had gone god knows what damage it could of done to me. used that stuff for years

steve
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john s 2

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Re: solvents
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2011, 07:41:52 PM »

Two pack paints are also bad for your health.Used in the car trade etc. Not sure whats given off?. May be a cynide derivitive. John.
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BigA

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Re: solvents
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2011, 11:48:33 AM »

Presumably you'll be spraying either acrylics or enamels? Thinners for both Humbrol (enamels - alkyd based) and Tamiya (acrylics - water and alcohol based) should hopefully be compatible with the spray gun components - what make is the gun?

A.
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Lord Bungle

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Re: solvents
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2011, 01:10:11 PM »

Two pack paints are also bad for your health.Used in the car trade etc. Not sure whats given off?. May be a cynide derivitive. John.
Early 2 pack or 2k paints were very very bad for you, my lungs are testament to this, the hardener was Polyisocyanate based current thinking on this loverly stuff is if you use a charcoal mask it will only give protection in a spraying environment for about 5 minutes.
Its not to bad in low quantities which is usefull as it is also found in some superglues.
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Lord Bungle

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Re: solvents
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2011, 01:14:27 PM »

  After a little Google searching I found these type of solvents are detrimental to aluminum and zinc derivative parts and castings. This type of solvent shows up as the following homogenate hydrocarbon solvents:
- Methyl chloride
- Dichloromethane
- 1.2 - dichloromethane
- Carbon tetrachloride
- Trichloethylene
- 1.1.1 - trichloroethane

John

1.1.1 - trichloroethane hopefully you will be hard pushed to find any of this these days. it was banned as it has a habbit of eating wholes in the ozone layer.


here is what wickipeadia has to say it does to us (not a reason to ban it)
SafetyAlthough not as toxic as many similar compounds, inhaled or ingested 1,1,1-trichloroethane does act as a central nervous system depressant and can cause effects similar to those of intoxication, including dizziness, confusion, and in sufficiently high concentrations, unconsciousness and death.

Fatal poisonings have been reported. and illness linked to trichloroethane from intentional inhalation in the 1980s. The removal of the chemical from correction fluid commenced due to Proposition 65 declaring it hazardous and toxic

Prolonged skin contact with the liquid can result in the removal of fats from the skin, resulting in chronic skin irritation. Studies on laboratory animals have shown that 1,1,1-trichloroethane is not retained in the body for long periods of time. However, chronic exposure has been linked to abnormalities in the liver, kidneys, and heart. Pregnant women should avoid exposure, as the compound has been linked to birth defects in laboratory animals (see teratogenesis).

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BarryM

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Re: solvents
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2011, 09:38:54 AM »

At one time carbon tet was used in fire extinguishers until somebody woke up to the fact that heat + carbon tet in a confined space (lots of them on a ship) was not a good idea. Probably wasn't much better outside.

Barry M
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hopeitfloats

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Re: solvents
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2011, 09:56:29 AM »

Presumably you'll be spraying either acrylics or enamels? Thinners for both Humbrol (enamels - alkyd based) and Tamiya (acrylics - water and alcohol based) should hopefully be compatible with the spray gun components - what make is the gun?

A.

thanks for the replies guys. i spent ages on google and couldnt find any useful information. yet again the forums have come to my rescue. the paint i'm using would be common enamel (the type you thin with mineral turpentine) because its just for a shelf to store my models on. the gun is a gravity feed 'spear and jackson'.
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Lord Bungle

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Re: solvents
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2011, 01:05:29 AM »

in that case I would suggest using turps to clean the gun :)
you can get gun wash from paint suppliers but I think that might react with the enamel
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StarLocAdhesives/FiveStar

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Re: solvents
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2011, 09:51:27 AM »

Early 2 pack or 2k paints were very very bad for you, my lungs are testament to this, the hardener was Polyisocyanate based current thinking on this loverly stuff is if you use a charcoal mask it will only give protection in a spraying environment for about 5 minutes.
Its not to bad in low quantities which is usefull as it is also found in some superglues.

There are no isocyanates in any superglues, they dont mix , isocyanates are in polyurethane adhesives such as foaming wood glues
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Lord Bungle

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Re: solvents
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2011, 01:05:31 PM »

There are no isocyanates in any superglues, they dont mix , isocyanates are in polyurethane adhesives such as foaming wood glues
my bad  :-) was told many moons ago they were in super glues, makes sense them being in polyurethane adhesives as thats basically what the paint is  :-))
is that a don't mix as in synthetic Thinners and filler dust don't mix?


PLEASE DON'T MIX FILLER DUST AND SYNTHETIC THINNERS
A good health and safety point there.
For those of you that do spray please be carefull of what you do with the waste, back in the 80's there were a number of fires in body repair shops, the cause was a very simple one, when cleaning up (yes they do it now and then) the filler dust was getting put in the bin, a bit latter on someone would chuck an old rag covered in thinners in, over night the workshop would burn down  :(( the reaction from the peroxide in the hardener and certain types of thinners produces a very similar product to rocket fuel. hydrogen peroxide is a very strong oxidizer and upon contact with any organic mater it is burns. For instance, if you soak a cotton rag with 90% hydrogen peroxide it burns very quickly. It can react in a hypergolic way if mixed with other chemicals.

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