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Author Topic: setting up a workshop  (Read 1463 times)

davidmichael

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setting up a workshop
« on: March 12, 2011, 02:26:24 pm »

Hello, I'm new to this forum. I'm also new to model ship building. I've been scratch building model  for many years. Just display, not r/c. All were built with hand tools. Now I am able to set up a real workshop. I want to be able to cut my own wood instead of buying it. I'm not sure what type of saw would be best for cutting thin sheets of pine or oak between 1/16 and 1/8 inch. I'm not sure a table saw's rip fence would be able to get that close to the blade. I know I'd need a special blade. Another thought was to get a band saw. I've allready decided to get a scroll saw, but would I be able to make the same cuts on a band saw as I would on a scroll saw? I'm also getting a bench type sander and drill press. Besides drilling, I think I can rig it for turning out parts in place of a lathe. If anyone has any advise I'd appreciate it. Thanks, david
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longshanks

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Re: setting up a workshop
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2011, 04:21:01 pm »

Hi David,

Quite a few people recommend Proxxon Tools

http://www.proxxon-direct.com/acatalog/Tabletop_Tools___Accessories_Woodworking.html

Full details on this site - then look at Amazon for prices  ok2
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PMK

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Re: setting up a workshop
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2011, 07:52:32 pm »

"I'm not sure a table saw's rip fence would be able to get that close to the blade."

Check the link given by Longshanks, then scroll down the page to the FKS/E table saw. You can rip 1/16" strips easily without fear of the fence getting in the way of the blade,but you will need to use the supplied table insert designed specifically for such narrow strips (it's but a 2-minute process to swap the insert). The other insert is designed for when you need to tilt the angle of the blade; it has a wider cut-out where the blade protrudes. Also the height of the blade is adjustable to suit the thickness of the wood which you intend to rip. No special blade is required - I simply use the supplied blade for ripping various-sized planks.

"...would I be able to make the same cuts on a band saw as I would on a scroll saw?"

It depends on the thickness of the bandsaw blade. The intructions supplied with your bandsaw will tell you minimum and maximum radius cut per each blade thickness. Bear in mind that the bandsaw will not be able to make inside cuts - you will need the scrollsaw for that purpose.
Bear in mind also that any bog-standard cheapo bandsaw is ideal for most all general-purpose hobby work, but you are advised to bin the supplied blade and to invest in a decent blade (read more expensive). The supplied blades are usually of inferior quality and tend to 'drift', whereas a good quality blade will give you a nice, straight cut every time when the machine is set and adjusted properly.

When you get your drill press, the first thing you might consider is to install something like this:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10163

... or perhaps a homebrew version, such as:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWn1lRTuOlk

I can't offer any advice regarding the bench-type sander, other than this mini 12-volt version which is used for pruning matrix board, printed circuit boards and suchlike.
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grayone

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Re: setting up a workshop
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 03:35:05 pm »

I'm also setting up a workshop for model building and bought a few of the more expensive Proxxon items from the UK.  I am now buying driect from Germany at 30% or more cheaper.  Search Ebay but make sure you include Germany in your search.

Graham
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