Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: how do you make a good paint job on a intricate superstructure?  (Read 1573 times)

cornishlad

  • Guest

hi,
never tried painting which i think is a very intricate item
it is 96 scale. air brush/paintbrush?
any ideas would be gratefull.
thanks pat.
Logged

Roadrunner

  • Guest
Re: how do you make a good paint job on a intricate superstructure?
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2011, 03:00:40 PM »

Both. I would suggest if not already paint some parts before glueing together, this will save a lot of time later in trying to get to the fiddly bits behind walls etc and without fear of knocking other parts off.

air brushes are great for large and small areas alike by changing the flow and spread of flow, but a paint brush can get those pesky little gaps the air brush missed, you find when air brushing you will spend more time masking then spraying, a brush may seam faster but the outcomes finish will be different from clean spray to brush marks even with the best brushes or techniques you can always see brush marks somewhere, if your not to fussy then brush is fine, if you have enough tape and time to mask up all the little detail without damaging it then go air brush.

I tend to use rattle cans for larger models, air brush if i'm using tinlets of paint, and paint brush for touch buts before any lacquer coats.
Logged

snowwolflair

  • Guest
Re: how do you make a good paint job on a intricate superstructure?
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2011, 03:15:46 PM »

Both. I would suggest if not already paint some parts before glueing together, this will save a lot of time later in trying to get to the fiddly bits behind walls etc and without fear of knocking other parts off.

air brushes are great for large and small areas alike by changing the flow and spread of flow, but a paint brush can get those pesky little gaps the air brush missed, you find when air brushing you will spend more time masking then spraying, a brush may seam faster but the outcomes finish will be different from clean spray to brush marks even with the best brushes or techniques you can always see brush marks somewhere, if your not to fussy then brush is fine, if you have enough tape and time to mask up all the little detail without damaging it then go air brush.

I tend to use rattle cans for larger models, air brush if i'm using tinlets of paint, and paint brush for touch buts before any lacquer coats.

I would agree with that advice, also warships have uniform colour and a lot of detail that can be lost with thick paint so I generally spry the entire model as a whole or sub-assemblies with three coats of well thinned grey enamel and then brush paint the detail.
Logged

DickyD

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9,497
  • www.srcmbc.org.uk
  • Location: Southampton UK
    • SRCMBC
Re: how do you make a good paint job on a intricate superstructure?
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2011, 04:01:58 PM »

I agree, I normally spray over with grey paint first on my war ships, though I tend to use matt paint, then I use brushes for the detail work.

For masking up I use Tamiya masking tape, its made for models and is excellent, slightly more expensive than most but worth it. :-))
Logged
Richard Solent Radio Controlled Model Boat Club http://www.srcmbc.org.uk

Roadrunner

  • Guest
Re: how do you make a good paint job on a intricate superstructure?
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2011, 05:48:09 PM »

Primer the model first is always a good start, forgot that (having a bad day) if doing warships then grey primer is best.

If doing light colours such as white or yellow (few examples) then a white based primer is more suited as the grey can take quite a few more coats to cover with lighter colours,( this tends to lead to loss of detail or thick paint runs to cover if impatient) white primer usually vanished within 2 coats using say yellow or light reds, white top coats usually after one, you can't see but at least 2 is needed, you can normally tell by the finish of the paint if the surface is well covered especially with gloss paints as the patchiness will be matt or satin effect.

finish coats to protect your work if using a matt paint are important ... obvious really, come in a range of finishes matt to match matt paint, but you can protect with satin or gloss over matt paints, i tend to find that a satin finish over either satin or matt colours give the most realistic effect in scale models, matt can be a little to harsh to the eye, gloss way over the top on some models.

Satin is a good all round for many models but the choice is your depending on what your painting and how you want it finished. either way Spray that finish on 1 or 2 coats usually suffices for most models.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up