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Author Topic: Water based resin  (Read 2366 times)

Colin Bishop

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Water based resin
« on: June 21, 2011, 07:59:45 PM »

Recently I bought a bottle of Deluxe Materials EzeCote water based resin. http://www.deluxematerials.com/products_building.html This is a one pack resin with damp cloth clean up which is claimed to subsitute for the more common two pack resins. I have not tried it with glass cloth but I have been using it to apply a plating effect on my latest model liner using cartridge paper to simulate the plating on the hull and have been very pleased with the results. The consistency is a bit thicker than milk and it goes tacky quite quickly and is touch dry within 20 minutes or so. When hard it is very easy to sand.

It seems to be excellent as a finishing resin or sealer or even an adhesive for something like deck planking and the damp cloth cleanup makes it a joy to use compared with conventional sticky two part resins. No smell either and just wash out the brush afterwards. It is claimed to stick to most surfaces and certainly seems to do that.

The nearest comparable product would seem to be the G4 polyurethane resin used for pond liners etc. but EzeCote is thinner and much easier to work with in a modelling situation. Definitely worth a try in my view.

Colin
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2011, 08:40:01 PM »


Very interesting Colin.  Can I ask a few questions please.

As you know I have over 400 windows  (portholes)  on my Titanic hull and wish to fill them with something that's clear and watertight.

To this end I was advised to try the window making product called  'Humbrol clear fix'.  I have spent two days running this tacky stuff into the holes and now found out it's not waterproof. I then spent two more days cleaning it all out and sanding smooth the hull. This required a respray to restore the finish and a re drill of the portholes to clean them out.

I was now planning to go the epoxy route but your suggestion above has got my interest.  Would you say that your 'find' is suitable product for filling 3mm hole with a  hypodermic needle with enough working time so that the needle doesn't get blocked. ?  As it would if using two part epoxy.

I enclose a picture of the result before removing it all.

Help please as I'm desperate ............... <:( <:( <:(

ken

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Colin Bishop

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2011, 08:55:28 PM »

Ken,

I don't think it would be suitable for portholes. However, Deluxe do other products such as Solid Water and Glue & Glaze which might be suitable. It's worth giving them a ring and asking their advice.

Colin
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2011, 09:08:25 PM »


Thanks for the Heads up Colin.

I've looked at their shop and some of the items are two part mixes which 'set a time table' to the construction. This would be the same as two part epoxies and the race against time when doing delicate work.  Hence my desire for a one part fluid which can be applied delicately.  (I don't want to spoil the re spray again)

I will telephone them and seek their advice

Cheers
 

ken



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Colin Bishop

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2011, 09:15:38 PM »

I appreciate your problem Ken, it's not easy glazing portholes in that situation. I'm afraid I have chickened out on my liner which is to 1:150 scale and will cut disks from blue Trimline tape and stick them on the hull. At that scale I reckon I will get away with it. Some of the ports are oval so I will put my leather punch in a vice and squeeze it until I get the right dimensions!

Cheers,

Colin

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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2011, 09:31:45 PM »


Thanks for the idea.  Unfortunately I only have access to about half of the drilled holes from the inside, so I am committed to filling them from the outside.

The Humbrol stuff was very tedious to apply with a cocktail stick and went all over the place. See wipe marks left on hull.  It's all gone now as she has been sanded and resprayed.

The ultimate answer is the two part clear epoxy but I would have to make small amounts each time as it would 'go off on me' as I'm going along the production line.  ( three rows of 70 holes)  There would always be the risk of not making the correct mix at some stage and it all going wrong.    Hence my jumping at the suggestion there might be a single part mix.

I was in the middle of emailing your recommended store so there might be light at the end of the tunnel. 

I'll let you know how I get on

ken



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gribeauval

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2011, 09:52:18 PM »

Recently I bought a bottle of Deluxe Materials EzeCote water based resin. http://www.deluxematerials.com/products_building.html This is a one pack resin with damp cloth clean up which is claimed to subsitute for the more common two pack resins. I have not tried it with glass cloth but I have been using it to apply a plating effect on my latest model liner using cartridge paper to simulate the plating on the hull and have been very pleased with the results. The consistency is a bit thicker than milk and it goes tacky quite quickly and is touch dry within 20 minutes or so. When hard it is very easy to sand.

It seems to be excellent as a finishing resin or sealer or even an adhesive for something like deck planking and the damp cloth cleanup makes it a joy to use compared with conventional sticky two part resins. No smell either and just wash out the brush afterwards. It is claimed to stick to most surfaces and certainly seems to do that.

The nearest comparable product would seem to be the G4 polyurethane resin used for pond liners etc. but EzeCote is thinner and much easier to work with in a modelling situation. Definitely worth a try in my view.

Colin

It works very well with fine surfacing fibre glass tissue. I have just finished the outside of my latest 1/12th scale Solent lifeboat with it. It sticks well and an extra couple of coats filled the tissue to give a very nice surface for painting. :-))


Mike
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stoney

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2011, 10:01:12 PM »


 Would hot glue be any good Ken?

 Paul
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wartsilaone

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2011, 10:01:25 PM »

Could I use it for casting?

Ali.
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Colin Bishop

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2011, 10:04:38 PM »

Quote
Could I use it for casting?

Sorry, no. It's really a cross between sanding sealer and finishing resin. The water content evaporates.

Colin
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wartsilaone

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Re: Water based resin
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2011, 10:10:45 PM »

Thanks Colin I won't waste my money on that then. However it may come in handy one day.

Ali.
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