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Author Topic: Smiths Docks  (Read 15788 times)

richtea

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #25 on: September 30, 2011, 11:33:21 pm »

Great photo's Bryan,
of a time when we could still build something other than debt.
A pox on all the politicians that have let things come to this.
Regards
Richard
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2011, 12:20:02 pm »

Xtian.....if you go down the coast a few miles past Hartlepool you'll find another - altogether different site. A large ship-breakers. If there's anything left of her, the Clemenceau is being "dismantled there.
Regards. Bryan.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2011, 12:39:48 pm »

Try these 2. Smiths Docks (North Shields) in 1930 and 2011. Housing, Supermarket and an Hotel will be plonked on the site soon.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2011, 03:15:55 pm »

Builds and repair jobs durin WW1. No room here for details, but all in the book.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2011, 03:50:57 pm »

I know I keep banging on about this, but the photos I've posted are really quite "fuzzy" at 160kb, pin sharp at 3mb as on the discs of the book. I'm NOT selling it....all free on reseipt of a couple of blank discs. They will also give you the stories behind the photos.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2011, 04:39:53 pm »

The East coast being the nearest part of the UK to Denmark (Jutland), I guess that the NE ports were the easiest to get to. Other yards were probably just as busy.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2011, 05:32:08 pm »

Probably to the great relief of you all, these are the last few photos I'm posting from this particular disc. Perhaps a few more from the 1924 Exhibition....but then I'll move on to 1926/1928.Hope you enjoyed the saga so far. BY.
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pugwash

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #32 on: October 01, 2011, 07:35:50 pm »

Bryan a very interesting snapshot of this period when the Tyne Tees and Wear were some of the busiest docks in the world
Really enjoyed seeing them - plenty more please.

Geoff
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #33 on: October 02, 2011, 01:17:37 pm »

These next few posts are primarily about the 1924 Exhibition.....except for the first 3 which is just one of Smiths adverts that are all on one page, hence the fuzziness. This second disc is just as interesting as the 1st one, and really shows how good the UK was at staging large events.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #34 on: October 02, 2011, 01:32:32 pm »

The tugs in No3 must have been visible for miles!
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #35 on: October 02, 2011, 01:52:26 pm »

What better time to catch up with a backlog than a rainy afternoon.....
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #36 on: October 02, 2011, 02:07:15 pm »

And these 6 are the final ones from this volume. I'm only about half way through the next volume....about 4 days work.
So take a breather!. BY.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #37 on: October 04, 2011, 12:52:09 pm »

I know I said it would be a few days before I got around to doing more....but the weather has taken a turn for the worse, so "indoors" calls.
Pic 3..An aptly named early "Flattie" collier with funnel folded down.
Pic 5..I love this one of an old "Bluey"!
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #38 on: October 04, 2011, 01:08:25 pm »

Heavy Lift ships. 2 of the "Bel" ships, forerunners of the WW2 ships built for the Ministry of Transport (the "Benledi" class). I never realised that at least some of the early ones were twin screw.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #39 on: October 04, 2011, 01:13:09 pm »

I think Smiths went a bit awry with the last 3 photos. The first one looks more like a single screw ship, and the 2 of the rudder is of a twin. Not like them to be wrong!. BY
Delete all that.........my eye is playing up again.
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thelegos

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #40 on: October 04, 2011, 01:25:23 pm »

Hi Bryan,
Just a quick but very big thank you for taking the time to share these 'photos. Absolutely captivating and very much appreciated.
Roger
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #41 on: October 04, 2011, 01:40:35 pm »

Thanks for your comments Roger, much appreciated.
The next set is a bit of an odd-ball. Apart from showing a lot of constructional details (check out the frame spacing) including a pretty good example of how the hatch beams were fitted. I get the impression that she was being converted to a sort of shelter-deck vessel, giving her an extra cargo deck....this is also borne out by the removal of the original hatch coamings.
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Liverbudgie

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #42 on: October 04, 2011, 02:26:34 pm »

Bryan,

A fantastic find you have there.

I wonder what became of all those models, do they still exist I wonder and, if they still do, are they locked away in some damp cellar or private collections?

Also interesting to see the picture of the Stentor and a bit of a coincidence as well, as I'm just about to order the drawings for her from the Dundee archives. That place is also a treasure trove of drawings and pictures as well.

I'll be in touch later if I may, about a copy of this archive.

Cheers,

LB
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pugwash

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #43 on: October 04, 2011, 02:44:41 pm »

Bryan please keep them coming - really enjoying this look into history.  By the way what is an old bluey??

Geoff
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #44 on: October 04, 2011, 03:28:38 pm »

LB....Please answer the request from Pugwash! Poor chap only knows about war canoes. He knows more about horses and yachts than he does about the "Merch" side of things. I've tried to educate him, but alas, some seeds fall on stony ground.
As to your remark about the CDs...I've now got 3 of them done and available to anyone who wants a copy. However, PLEASE contact me via my direct e-mail address rather than a PM over the forum. Any replies I do that way (PMs) seldom seem to reach the recipient. Bryan.
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #45 on: October 04, 2011, 03:50:22 pm »

A little preamble to the next bit...if I may.
The next volume includes a good size article about Consett Iron Works. I imagine most steel/Iron users in the NE used Consett for supplies. I was born and bred within a sort of sight of the Iron works until we moved to the coast when I was 11 years old. If the wind was from the west we used to get covered in the red dust from Consett, and if it was from the East we got covered in the black dust from the surrounding coal mines. But my real memories relate back to 1945 when my sister was born in a maternity hospital just outside Consett...during an air-raid. The sound of the aircraft (both sides), the searchlights illuminating the many barrage balloons and all that stuff. But relating to all that...only came to mind while doing this thread....what was the point of the "blackout" when the nightly tipping of the molten "xxxxx" from the iron-works could probably be seen for hundreds of miles by an incoming aircraft. And Consett was only one of many. Probably the only one built on the top of a high plateau though. This "tipping" light was really quite awesome in retrospect. Didn't need street lights thats for sure, even where we lived about 6 miles away.
Anyway, end of that. Perusing the old photos of ships in dry-dock. I can't remember when I last saw ships in dock with any sort of side-props. Contrary to popular belief, they were not to stop the ship falling over. They were to stop the ship bulging outwards!
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #46 on: October 04, 2011, 04:05:41 pm »

But back to the picture story:-
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #47 on: October 04, 2011, 05:49:25 pm »

The last 4 of these pics are generic and don't really relate to any one ship. Just showing how things were done "then".
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richtea

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #48 on: October 04, 2011, 08:10:30 pm »

Bryan,
can you remember the acrid smell from the molten "xxxxx" ?
In the sixties when I was a lad, one of my mate's dad's was a foreman of an iron work's.
After school when I called for him they would be emptying the furnace of the "xxxxx".
The furnace was less than 50 ft from his front door.
In the winter it was great place to play, as long as we stayed at the bottom of the ramp away from the charging doors.
A nice warm play area with piles of sizzling "xxxxx" at one end and his front door at the other.
I wonder what the health and safety brigade would make of that ?
Regards
Richard  :-))
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Bryan Young

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Re: Smiths Docks
« Reply #49 on: October 04, 2011, 10:51:14 pm »

Richard, no  modern young twizzler could ever even imagine the kind of lifestyle (if there was such a word back then). But somehow we survived. I don't mean those of us that survived things like Diptheria, TB or Scarlet Fever (that killed some pals of mine at an absurdly young age).
All the so-called "privations" were just the normal way of things then. our playgrounds were the local rubbish dumps. Dumps that were internally combusting like the adjacent pit-heaps. Filling old bottles with water and then waiting for them to explode...simple stuff like that.
No, we weren't poor, simply because we didn't know that we were poor.
And basically, what a happy childhood I had. No money, but running free all day in the woods with my pals is also a memory worth cherishing. Bryan.
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