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Author Topic: Assurance Tug build  (Read 27344 times)

Spook

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Assurance Tug build
« on: October 13, 2011, 05:34:26 PM »

My Model Slipway Assurance Tug kit has finally arrived! I'm just waiting for a few bits and pieces, and I'll be making a start. Hopefully I'll be able to keep you up to date with pictures of the build as I go along.

I've marked out a plank of wood for the stand, using the supplied templates but, as it's been sitting in the damp shed for a few weeks I'd better let it dry out for a couple of days before letting the jig saw loose on it. I didn't think you'd really want to see a picture of a plank of wood, so I didn't bother taking one   :}

I still can't decide whether to go for the WWII or civilian version but I don't have to make that decision just yet. The WWII version would probably be more interesting but, as 2/3 of my fleet are grey, I thought civilian colours might balance things up a bit.

Oh, and I've learned a new word as I studied the instructions - MOLGOGGER. No doubt I'll be using a few choice ones of my own as I progress/struggle with the build  ok2
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2011, 03:57:37 PM »

Well, I made a start. Drilled out the holes in the hull for portholes and ports. There will be a lot of tidying-up, as the gel-coat around the portholes broke up quite a bit during drilling. I also made a pig's ear of drilling out for the prop tube as well. I was slightly off-centre and some of the outer casing came off the hull. Oh well, nothing that a spot of glue and some artistic use of filler can't fix. No pics yet, as I want to tidy it up before posting and I have had enough of fibreglass for one day.
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ZZ56

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2011, 03:34:16 AM »

Sorry for the late reply (bit useless now) but when drilling fiberglass, I find it's helpful to drill undersize and step the hole up with a conical rotary file.  The file doesn't lift and chip things, compared to a drillbit.  They are very inexpensive and go right in your cordless drill. 
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2011, 11:44:26 AM »

A conical rotary file sounds like a good idea. Maybe next time...

Anyway, here we go...


PANTS!   >:-o
(I started off with a small bit, worked up to 6.5mm and this happened. Oh well, time for epoxy, filler and hand-filing the hole.)
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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2011, 10:57:50 PM »

Well, I made a start. Drilled out the holes in the hull for portholes and ports. There will be a lot of tidying-up, as the gel-coat around the portholes broke up quite a bit during drilling. I also made a pig's ear of drilling out for the prop tube as well. I was slightly off-centre and some of the outer casing came off the hull. Oh well, nothing that a spot of glue and some artistic use of filler can't fix. No pics yet, as I want to tidy it up before posting and I have had enough of fibreglass for one day.

Yep! This model shares the same hull as the Envoy and I had similar problems. I used about 12 different drills stepping up in size and still damaged the case where the prop tube runs in that very narrow section.

I also found gel coating came off the hull when drilling the portholes and anchor holes out. And that despite using many drills, stepping up in size again plus they were sharp drills. I tried a bit of tape over some holes but that didnt make a difference tbh.

The rudder shaft \ pintel thing is a real ball ache to set up but if you use a bit of cyano to tack it then slow setting epoxy, you can get it sorted. I also found fitting the fore and aft deck sections into the hull less than easy. The instructions say not to reduce the width of these but the hull was really straining to open up and accept them as they were. In the end I did resort to reducing the width a little to get them in the hull!
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Model_Slipway

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2011, 01:48:05 PM »

I make holes in fibreglass as follows:

For portholes: drill a small hole to get the point of a tapered reamer in (usually 3-4mm). Then gradually turn the tapered reamer until the required hole size is achieved.  (It is almost impossible to achieve a perfect round hole with a drill).

For the prop-shaft  I drill a small hole,  and then use 6mm and 8mm tapered round files. I first use the 6mm tapered file to the full diameter, then go in with the 8mm tapered file to the full diameter. DO NOT PUSH AND PULL as you would expect but push in and apply pressure turning the file anti-clockwise at the same time.  Doing it this way will not chip the gel-coat.

The hull sides can be opened up by at least 50mm without causing any damage.

I hope the above helps.
Lawrie
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2011, 09:26:25 PM »

Thanks Lawrie. Yes, this is pretty much what I did with the portholes. Drilled small holes first of all then used a rounded/curved fine file to shape the holes which cleaned up most of the cracking.

To recover from the propshaft hole problem I used a combination of a Dremel at its lowest setting, with a small tungsten carbide grinding bit, going round and round enlarging the hole, then the aforementioned curved file to tidy it up.  I'm busy for most of this weekend so, once I've fitted the propshaft, I'll build up around the broken end with filller/putty and Bob will be my uncle.
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derekwarner

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2011, 10:06:56 PM »

Another tip prior to drilling holes for prop shafts or bow thrusters   %)

Select a suitable sized nitrile o-ring....if needed deform the o-ring into an elliptical shape & secure to the hull [in the intended opening/intersection location] with a few drops of superglue
Fill the internal void of the o-ring with epoxy filler or 'karbog'....& smooth the top surface
When dry, the o-ring can be lifted out & you are left with a very tidy looking reinforcement ring plate
So even that you have more depth or thickness to drill through..........you end up with a surface that will greatly resist cracking of the external gel coat due to the fact you are reducing the propensity of chatter  O0 .....Derek
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Derek Warner

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Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op
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www.ils.org.au

Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2011, 01:34:20 AM »

A little progress since my last post. The prop tube is now in and I have built up around it  to replace the bits that came off when I was drilling. I have fitted the portholes and glazed them with waterproof PVA adhesive. This didn't go quite as  well as I'd hoped, as there are a few bubbles. The deck supports are now in place, so I guess the next step is building and fitting the rudder assembly.
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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2011, 10:15:11 PM »

A little progress since my last post. The prop tube is now in and I have built up around it  to replace the bits that came off when I was drilling. I have fitted the portholes and glazed them with waterproof PVA adhesive. This didn't go quite as  well as I'd hoped, as there are a few bubbles. The deck supports are now in place, so I guess the next step is building and fitting the rudder assembly.

Before fitting the pintle, you need to cut a little bit off the top otherwise, there isnt enough of the rudder post sticking through to fasten the rudder arm onto it (guess how I found out!). To be fair, it does show a diagram in the instructions indicating a little should be cut off but I missed it and am pretty certain it isnt mentioned in the text although I could be wrong there.

Do lots of trial fits especially regarding the rudder pintle. If it isnt glued in accurately, it will bind when the rudder is deflected. The base of the pintle needs to be chamfered to the curvature of the hull to get the hole truely vertical. I found many trial fits helped when taking a little at a time to match the hull curvature. When you are confident with that. tack everything in place with a little superglue. Then try the rudder over full deflection to port and starboard. If there is any binding, you need to find out why, re trim and re fit \ glue as necessary. Only when you are 100% certain you have no binding would I advise gluing with slow setting epoxy.

Using slow setting epoxy will allow you to constantly check nothing has moved and if so, make very minor correction to get everything free moving.

HTH.
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2011, 01:43:20 PM »

Thanks for that advice, unfortunately I only just saw it, as I haven't been on the forum much lately and had already fitted the rudder.  :-))

Anyway the good news is that the rudder is fitted and working (just needs a bit of lube to waterproof it and stop it squeaking). I actually had to file a bit off the top of part EC1 (the big frame that the rudder fits into) as it was protruding too far inside the hull for the pivot to sit snugly. I didn't bother filing the pivot to fit the base of the hull, instead tacked it in position once I had it positioned correctly then used fast epoxy to hold it in it's permanent position and fill the gaps. A little risky I know but I waited until the epoxy was about to 'go off' and was a little less runny, to do the filling. The rudder shaft protrudes a little higher inside the hull than I would have liked, but the stern hatch above it will be hollow, so it won't foul the deck.

Now I'm trying to decide where to put the r/c bits. This will depend on what ballast I'm using. At the moment it looks like it will be bags of small pebbles, which are a bit bulky, but find their natural position in the hull quite nicely. I think I know what I'm going to do but, as I'm working 12-hour nights at the moment, I don't have a lot of time, so maybe I'll make a start during the week.
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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2011, 10:03:23 PM »

Thanks for that advice, unfortunately I only just saw it, as I haven't been on the forum much lately and had already fitted the rudder.  :-))

Anyway the good news is that the rudder is fitted and working (just needs a bit of lube to waterproof it and stop it squeaking). I actually had to file a bit off the top of part EC1 (the big frame that the rudder fits into) as it was protruding too far inside the hull for the pivot to sit snugly. I didn't bother filing the pivot to fit the base of the hull, instead tacked it in position once I had it positioned correctly then used fast epoxy to hold it in it's permanent position and fill the gaps. A little risky I know but I waited until the epoxy was about to 'go off' and was a little less runny, to do the filling. The rudder shaft protrudes a little higher inside the hull than I would have liked, but the stern hatch above it will be hollow, so it won't foul the deck.

Now I'm trying to decide where to put the r/c bits. This will depend on what ballast I'm using. At the moment it looks like it will be bags of small pebbles, which are a bit bulky, but find their natural position in the hull quite nicely. I think I know what I'm going to do but, as I'm working 12-hour nights at the moment, I don't have a lot of time, so maybe I'll make a start during the week.

Hmmm. I'd maybe reconsider the pebbles as ballast if I were you.

I found that with two 12v 4ah SLA's I needed quite a bit of lead to make the Envoy sit right in the water. I also have an MMB smoke generator and voltage convertor so there is quite a bit of ballast needed. although the hull looks quite cavernous, I found once I got all my gear and batteries in, there wasnt that much room.
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2011, 12:22:05 AM »

My r/c setup is very basic and at the  moment there is loads of room in the hull. I was thinking of going down the lead route but I have no idea where I could get some locally. I have a couple of 1kg bags of small pebbles from Ikea and a long pebble beach about 50m from the lake (but don't tell anyone I'm going down there with a bucket  :-)) )
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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2011, 06:35:29 PM »

My r/c setup is very basic and at the  moment there is loads of room in the hull. I was thinking of going down the lead route but I have no idea where I could get some locally. I have a couple of 1kg bags of small pebbles from Ikea and a long pebble beach about 50m from the lake (but don't tell anyone I'm going down there with a bucket  :-)) )

Your local DIY store should have it on a roll and you can normally buy it in any length. I get mine from the local store about 24" by 6" at a time. The store isnt large so we arent talking B&Q type places.

Its used by builders as lead flashing on roofs.

HTH
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2011, 12:37:14 AM »

Ta. We have a Jewsons' and B&Q near us but not much in the way of local DIY or hardware shops, but I'll keep looking.
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2011, 01:03:32 PM »

Some progress pics. I (managed to get a roll of lead from Jewson's)

The fitted rudder - turns quite nicely, but a bit stiff at the extremes.


Motor, rudder servo and rudder arm. I fitted the rudder servo quite high so as to be as much in line as possible with the rudder arm. Problem was that when I came to slide in the aft deck, I had to cut away at some of the deck crossbeam support as the servo arm was fouling it. Still, it seems to support the deck OK.


R/C stuff, battery slot and some of the ballast.


Overall view, waiting for the deck filler to set.


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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2011, 07:04:34 PM »

Yep, had similar issues with the rudder servo mounting and push rod fouling the cross beams so did same as you and had to cut a slot out!

I use some silicon sealer to fix the motor and hold the lead sheet in place and stop them moving about. Will you be running on 12v or 7.2v? Generally the m troniks speedos use 7.2v although dedicated marine one can use 12v.

I'd also try and position the rx higher up and away from the esc \ motor to avoid interference. You'll need an extension cable as the esc ones are short.

 :-))
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2011, 01:55:29 PM »

I was thinking of moving the receiver up next to the rudder servo, although I have a similar setup to the current one in one of my other boats, which doesn't seem to give any problems. I'll give it a try as it is and move it if necessary, it's only held on with Velcro.

I have a 12v / 7Ah Graupner battery, which gives a few pounds of ballast, so I should only need to add a few small pieces of lead additional to that already installed for final trimming.  The existing lead pretty much holds itself in place, as I have moulded it to the shape of the hull however, once final trimming is complete (and any excess lead snipped off) I shall fix it permanently to the hull.

The battery should be OK with the ESC.

I'm holding the battery in place with the pieces of wood and, for the base, strips cut from a non-slip mouse mat to stop it sliding forwards.

I have used "No More Nails" to mount the motor, as much as an experiment as anything, as it has done a sterling job of holding up a set of blinds at home, which take a hammering.  ok2


My alter ego - Captain Clumsy - managed to spill the best part of a large mug of sweet black coffee all over my instruction booklet and work area this morning so, after a two-hour, frustration-removing attack on a huge pile of ironing, I am now working in a sepia hue, which I have to say is rather calming, if a little sticky.  ok2
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2012, 07:54:17 PM »

I've made a little more progress, but not a great deal.

I moved the receiver to a higher position aft and added the main deck, filled and sanded, and made a start on the superstructure and wheelhouse. Next job is to paint the interior of the wheelhouse (and maybe add some features, I don't know).

I had a few gaps when fitting the wheelhouse, the side ones I can plug with filler but had some fairly big ones around the front of the wheelhouse, so I added some skirting, which should be unnoticeable when the screens are on.

The hull is just about done now so I need to get that primed and painted. This is decision time folks, do I do it in the Navy grey (that everyone else seems to have done this model in) or so I go for civilian colours?  As most of my existing fleet is grey, I'll probably avoid that. I'm not too fussed about authenticity so I might just choose my own colour scheme.




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110samec

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2012, 08:59:21 PM »

It's looking good :-))
I think you should make it a customized civillian scheme in your own towing company (maybe Spook Towing?). The story could be that it was sold to a differnet company when the other one was modernized.
I have the Tsekoa on order and it should be here next week :-)

Sam
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Norseman

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2012, 02:43:38 AM »

Hi guys


Just reading Sam's post (been lurking here for a while anyway), so I looked up the Assurance class tugs on http://uboat.net/allies/warships/class/355.html. In the list of 21 ships I found Frisky, Jaunty, and Saucy. I had always believed the names were only of Racia (sometimes called Frisky) class tugs. I looked a bit further found these three really were Assurance class but had the names of the earlier Racia class of ships. Just thought I'd pop that snippet in here. :-) Now I am wondering about the other 18 names ........... probably just getting Mayhemitis.

Regards Dave
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justboatonic

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2012, 07:00:04 PM »

I've made a little more progress, but not a great deal.

I moved the receiver to a higher position aft and added the main deck, filled and sanded, and made a start on the superstructure and wheelhouse. Next job is to paint the interior of the wheelhouse (and maybe add some features, I don't know).

I had a few gaps when fitting the wheelhouse, the side ones I can plug with filler but had some fairly big ones around the front of the wheelhouse, so I added some skirting, which should be unnoticeable when the screens are on.

The hull is just about done now so I need to get that primed and painted. This is decision time folks, do I do it in the Navy grey (that everyone else seems to have done this model in) or so I go for civilian colours?  As most of my existing fleet is grey, I'll probably avoid that. I'm not too fussed about authenticity so I might just choose my own colour scheme.






Looking good. The Assurance has the plasticard superstructure while Envoy has a GF one.

One word of advice, make sure you paint the tow hook house and structure before you glue the main upper deck down. It easier to paint the tow house structure before this is done.

I painted the hull, rear deck, engine room and tow hook housing before I stuck down the main deck which was also painted off the model.
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110samec

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2012, 07:05:39 PM »

I don't know if you've put windows in and I don't know if clear plastic comes in the kit. A tip I found when making side windows in model aircraft is to use clear acetate or plastic from a folder. It's really thin, flexible and looks like glass.

Cheers
Sam
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Model_Slipway

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2012, 07:09:57 PM »

110samec

PM sent.

Jackie
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Spook

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Re: Assurance Tug build
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2012, 07:45:21 PM »

I don't know if you've put windows in and I don't know if clear plastic comes in the kit. A tip I found when making side windows in model aircraft is to use clear acetate or plastic from a folder. It's really thin, flexible and looks like glass.

Cheers
Sam
Yes, I have added glazing - a sheet comes with the kit - much more than you need, which is just as well, as my clear plastic cutting skills usually necessitate several attempts. If you look very carefully, you can just about make out the strips of acetate or whatever it is. I was VERY sparing with the glue so as not to smudge the windows, but I bet I still manage cock it up when I put the frames on the outside.
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