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Author Topic: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane  (Read 3930 times)

TailUK

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United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« on: November 01, 2011, 01:28:29 PM »

I've found the time to start my build of the "USS Harriet Lane".  

Harriet Lane, built for the Treasury Department by William H. Webb, was launched in New York City November 1857.  Harriet Lane transferred to the Navy on 30 March 1861 for service in the expedition sent to Charleston Harbor, S.C., to supply the Fort Sumter garrison. She departed New York 8 April and arrived off Charleston 11 April. The next day she fired a shot across the bow of Nashville when that merchantman appeared with no colors flying.  This is considered the first naval action of the American civil war.

Launched: 19 November 1857
Commissioned: 28 February 1858
Length: 180 ft.
Navigation Draft: 10 ft.
Beam: 30 ft.
Displacement: 674-13/95 tons
Rig: Brigantine





The basis of the model is a GRP clipper ship hull about 34" inches long.  The first photos show the finished hull in and out of the mould.  More to follow!
 

 
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tigertiger

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2011, 01:56:44 PM »

I have moved this build into Yachts and Sail.
You will get much better responses to your postings.


TT
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TailUK

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2011, 02:55:37 PM »

I have moved this build into Yachts and Sail.
You will get much better responses to your postings.

TT


Wasn't sure if an armed side wheel paddle steamer belonged in here or not.
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Edward Pinniger

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2011, 05:00:41 PM »

I'll definitely be following this build with interest - I built the old Pyro/Lindberg plastic kit of this ship a few years ago (still builds into a nice model despite its 50+ years of age). Certainly a fascinating subject for a working model!

Will you be building your model with a working sail rig, or paddle-driven only?
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TailUK

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2011, 05:42:28 PM »

I'll definitely be following this build with interest - I built the old Pyro/Lindberg plastic kit of this ship a few years ago (still builds into a nice model despite its 50+ years of age). Certainly a fascinating subject for a working model!

Will you be building your model with a working sail rig, or paddle-driven only?

I'd planned initially to run it paddles only but who knows, I might rig the sails later.
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tigertiger

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2011, 11:31:59 AM »

Wasn't sure if an armed side wheel paddle steamer belonged in here or not.


Yes, it is a bit of an oddity.
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rcboater

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2011, 03:14:55 AM »

Harriet Lane is an old favorite of mine,  too-- one that I've given some amount of thought to as a potential RC subject.  I'm a plankowner (1984)  from the new USCG Cutter Harriet Lane, homeported in Portsmouth, Virginia. 

I've done some research,  but the one thing I haven't found much about is how the ship was handled at sea.  Did they use the sails and paddles at the same time? 
It seems to me that under sail alone, the paddles would make an awful lot of drag.  And while they are fine in coastal waters and harbors, I would think paddles would be really inefficient if the ship was rolling in a seaway.....   

All things considered, it seems to me the ship was likely a motor sailer most of the time.

I haven't found anything to indicate that the ship had independent control of the paddles--so I assume they both only  ran at the same rpm in the same direction.

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TailUK

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2011, 01:00:06 PM »

Harriet Lane is an old favorite of mine,  too-- one that I've given some amount of thought to as a potential RC subject.  I'm a plankowner (1984)  from the new USCG Cutter Harriet Lane, homeported in Portsmouth, Virginia. 

I've done some research,  but the one thing I haven't found much about is how the ship was handled at sea.  Did they use the sails and paddles at the same time? 
It seems to me that under sail alone, the paddles would make an awful lot of drag.  And while they are fine in coastal waters and harbors, I would think paddles would be really inefficient if the ship was rolling in a seaway.....   

All things considered, it seems to me the ship was likely a motor sailer most of the time.

I haven't found anything to indicate that the ship had independent control of the paddles--so I assume they both only  ran at the same rpm in the same direction.



My own researches in the Harriet Lane  begain badly due to confusion about that most basic information, her length.  Some sources quote her as being 270 feet long while the more correct research indicates her to have been 180 feet.  I'm still not sure if this should include the Bowsprit.
It appears that she was twin engined as Pulsifer's account below refers to a crankshaft fault in the starboard engine.  This offers the possibilty that her paddlewheels could be independantly controlled. 
However,  some of what I've read about fixed float paddlewheels would suiggest that independent action can have alarming consequences for the ship's handling.  A sidewheeler can heel badly towards the slower moving paddle even to the extent of capsizing.
Harriet Lane was described as a fast ship but little is written about her general handling and most sources agree the sails were considered as auxillery power.  If Royal Navy operations are an indicator, sails were deployed on long distance runs to conserve coal.

The links below are to 2 pdfs on the USCG website section on Coast Guard involment in the Civil War.  One is modern and the other a contemporary account of the Harriet Lane


http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/HarrietLaneAnderson2003Article.pdf

http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/HarrietLanePulsifer1917.pdf
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rcboater

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2011, 12:46:05 AM »

I think that the sites that list her length as 270 feet have mixed her up with the one I sailed  on--  the current Harriet Lane (WMEC-903)  is a 270 foot long "Famous" or "Bear" class cutter. 

My research agrees that the 1858 Harriet Lane was 180 feet.   

Model Shipways makes a nice wood model of the HL- if you look at the Model Expo site, you can download the kit instructions.

 
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TailUK

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2011, 09:45:18 AM »

I think that the sites that list her length as 270 feet have mixed her up with the one I sailed  on--  the current Harriet Lane (WMEC-903)  is a 270 foot long "Famous" or "Bear" class cutter. 

My research agrees that the 1858 Harriet Lane was 180 feet.   

Model Shipways makes a nice wood model of the HL- if you look at the Model Expo site, you can download the kit instructions.

 

  Thanks for that, the rigging info will be very useful.
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TailUK

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Re: United States Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2011, 10:54:26 AM »

BIG DECISION - TO PLANK OR NOT TO PLANK?

    I'm puzzling as to weather or not to simulate the wooden planking and copper sheathing on the Harriet's GRP hull.  I would probably use aluminium duct tape cut into strips then painted over.  I'm inclined to do it but really wanted to get on and get her sailing.  I'd be interested in comments and or suggestions of, perhaps, a quick and easy way to simulate the planking.
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