Model Boat Mayhem

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down

Author Topic: HMS Warrior  (Read 3309 times)

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10,850
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
HMS Warrior
« on: January 26, 2012, 09:20:51 pm »

I caught Warrior agaist a dramatic sky this afternoon - she may need to be recommisioned soon the way things are going....

Colin

Logged

bobk

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2012, 09:40:41 pm »

Lovely ship.  Great photo.
As to recommissioning, the lofty expanse of cabling (electronic warfare antennae?) might make flying off Typhoons problematical.  Do you think Argentina might have noticed our lack of carriers?
Woops, should not have published that.
Logged

Martin [Admin]

  • Administrator
  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20,312
  • Location: Peterborough, UK
    • Model Boat Mayhem
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2012, 10:22:20 pm »

Nice!  :-))
Logged
"This is my firm opinion, but what do I know?!"    -   Mayhem FaceBook Group!

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2012, 10:38:47 pm »

Hello

Recommissionning ?  That means a commanding officer have to be nammed for her ?   :-)) ?  

Here in France, as there are fewer and fewer vessels in service - officers are ready to kill rivals to get a place to command a ship. You're lucky with your Victory, then the warrior would be a second nice place for commanding officer,  then the Warrior is even better : she's afloat.

Here in France a "friend of me", was commanding a ship for two years ... without going at sea as 6 months with engine failure, then one year for maintenance and drydocking, then 6 months to re-equip the ship .  Then he left the command  :embarrassed: for a office work in Paris.  Nice isn't it ?  

I heard that around 1900 a French navy officer received the command of a grounding colonial ship on the Yangtze river, then he stay 3 years in that position with the whole crew ... Then some months after he left his command (after three years !) then the river had a flood and the ship was free to sail again !  

Poor people, staying 3 year on a grounding ship so far away !  

Xtian  
Logged

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2012, 10:39:17 pm »

same spot - different lens

Geoff
Logged

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2012, 10:48:46 pm »

Same spot, nice weather. What a pity we were not all at once it would have gone a pint

Xtian



Logged

Liverbudgie

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,168
  • Model Boat Mayhem is the Best!
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2012, 10:59:31 pm »


Here in France a "friend of me", was commanding a ship for two years ... without going at sea as 6 months with engine failure, then one year for maintenance and drydocking, then 6 months to re-equip the ship .  Then he left the command  :embarrassed: for a office work in Paris.  Nice isn't it ?  

Xtian  

Would that be the CG............? :P At least I had a very good lunch onboard when on a visit to Toulon.

LB
Logged

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2012, 11:07:10 pm »

Yep the CdG had some problems like that at the beginning of her career and certainely a commanding officer had also "the chance" to command her ... in dry dock  :-))  

My friend was commanding a smaller ship.  One think you have to know is that guy is a notorious unluky man.  One time I was on the same ship as him (not on command position) then each time he was on watch I was crossing my finger and making a pray !

Xtian    
Logged

farrow

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2012, 10:40:25 am »

Different postion and time, but may be of interest, some pics of her arrival. I was reading those comments on the shortage of commands in the French Navy. I believe it is a similiar postion in the RN and has been for some time, not so long ago a RN commander had only 18 months in command of a frigate /destroyer and some officers on leaving Dartmouth never step on a vessel except for drinks in their entire carreer.

Logged

farrow

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2012, 10:44:39 am »

Sorry pushed the wrong button, here are the other pics.





Logged

deadbeat

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2012, 01:10:34 pm »

I remember her coming into Pompey, lots of photies (non digital), etc; also lots of photies of USS Iowa entering and leaving Pompey in 1987.
Logged

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2012, 02:02:50 pm »

Hello

I asked myself questions about what Pompey is  ? I've googleized with Pompey / Portsmouth words and found this  http://www.welcometoportsmouth.co.uk/pompey.html

Nice, I'm learning so much here !

Iowa in "Pompey", it must be an impressive job for the harbor pilot and also interresting for the people on the Round Tower. 

Each time I came to Porstmouth I'm surprised with this old fashion harbour, It's easy to imagine this place during 18th and 19th centuries with a lot of sailing ship and first steamer in a this maze of docks, basins, locks ...  But for actual need this harbour is not easy (I think)

Xtian
Logged

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10,850
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2012, 02:40:59 pm »

I went aboard Iowa during her visit which I covered for the old 'Sea Classic International' magazine. I was also on board one of the small craft that escorted Iowa out of the harbour on her departure. The whole thing was quite unforgettable, it's not every day you see a battleship in full commission visit the UK and it will almost certainly never happen again.

Portsmouth harbour is a busy place. In addition to the warships you have the harbour ferries, Isle of Wight ferres, the cross Channel ferries and quite a few freight ship movements. The harbour is also home to hundreds of pleasure craft and is attracting an increasing number of cruise ship calls so there is always something to see.

Colin
Logged

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2012, 04:03:06 pm »

Quote
Portsmouth harbour is a busy place. In addition to the warships you have the harbour ferries, Isle of Wight ferres, the cross Channel ferries and quite a few freight ship movements. The harbour is also home to hundreds of pleasure craft and is attracting an increasing number of cruise ship calls so there is always something to see

Yes of course and I was also some time coming via Brittany Ferries. It's very nice to see this Isle of Wight ferries, Channel Island ones,  reefers etc... I have lot on nice pics from excellent place which are these larges ferries.   I'm still like surprised each time I came to see this old fashion harbour not looking adaped to actual need.

The Isle of Wright ferries coming in a small basin like a corner, without so much place for next cargo of boarding cars. When a ferry is in this place the inside and outside cambers looks blocked.  The navy base is like a labyrinth of docks and most of them not adapted to receive large ships and/or large equipment on the quay etc...  Access to basins is hard and need time + tugs via dry dock /locks etc ...  

Nice historic place (I've visited the museum parts)   but for the navy base it is not easy for many things in term of actual activities.  I'm still surprise each time I'm coming as I'm also surprise with the British choice to built all major ships like Lego with blocks from all around the country, at least none of your shipyards will be able to built a complete ship and none of them are equipped with last updated technologies.

I've read this morning that for the next generation of RN replenishment at sea ships the last two tenders are the Italian and Korean ones ... Maybe a result of this strange political choice ?

It's not from my side non-constructive criticism about Porstmouth and shipyard choice, it's just a talking from an outside spectator (me) with inside ones : all of you ... (humm there is some Australian and rest of the world people here  :D)

Xtian

Logged

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10,850
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2012, 04:54:41 pm »

Quote
I've read this morning that for the next generation of RN replenishment at sea ships the last two tenders are the Italian and Korean ones ... Maybe a result of this strange political choice ?

Probably because the UK has the strange habit of obeying EEC procurement legistlation while France simply ignores it if it doesn't suit them.  ok2

Colin
Logged

Netleyned

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8,984
  • Location: Meridian Line, Mouth of the Humber
    • cleethorpes mba
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2012, 05:04:21 pm »

So EEC Procurement legislation allows Korean tenders.
Say no more

Ned
Logged
Smooth seas never made skilful sailors
Up Spirits  Stand fast the Holy Ghost.
http://www.cleethorpesmba.co.uk/

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2012, 07:16:43 pm »

Not thinking about EU  (there is no more EEC since many years  O0)  It's allways an easy way for British to blame UE for anythings, I'm almost sure UE is fully not involve in the first list with UK and abroad contender and then this decision from MoD to keep only Italy and Korean tender.

I think it's more a british habit to buy everything from abroad since there is pennies to save ... then workers are in the streets.

The link where I've seen this info this morning. http://www.meretmarine.com/article.cfm?id=118562

Xtian
Logged

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10,850
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2012, 08:40:57 pm »

There is quite a bit about this on various sites. Yes, the ships are basically commercial vessels and it is cheaper to build them in a country with lower costs. The UK has very little significant shipbuilding capability left now. I suppose the issue is to what extent Western nations should still be involved in relatively low tech heavy industry that can be more economically carried out by countries with a lower cost base. This doesn't just apply to the UK. The Brittany Ferries fleet, with the exception of Bretagne, has all been constructed outside of France and most maintenance seems to be untertaken in Poland. Companies go wherever they can get the best deal but it can certainly be argued that Governments should preserve a native capacity for construction in their national interests.

It was only a couple of years ago that there was much talk about France and the UK sharing an aircraft carrier to relieve pressure on their defence budgets although how that could possibly have worked in practice strains the imagination! Now of course, with the arguing about the future of the Eurozone, the relationship between UK and French politicians is distinctly frosty although I would hope that that would not apply to individual citizens. I have spent many holidays in France and enjoyed them all and we usually visit at least twice a year.

Colin
Logged

triumphjon

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2012, 10:03:42 pm »

its nice to see so many older photos of the warroir ,even in its current location ! i can see the tops of her masts from our balcony , or when they are returned the mast tops of victory from our front door , or kitchen window . im often sailing alongside the warroir with my own models upto two hours either side of the high tide .jon
Logged

Xtian29

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 511
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2012, 10:32:42 pm »

Hello Colin

Far from my mind to talk about UK France relations,  since long time we are working at sea together without any problems and friendly, no need to have politicians to help as some time they are cold and some time warm, during that time the real life continue.  I spent some time in UK with great pleasure, I'm joking about English versus France (not British) as the English are the enemy in rugby.  

Looking for "Name that ship game" on Mayhem I was looking first to the Trinity House fleet then I've seen that those ships are coming from Poland, then your custom ships are from The Netherlands, your "navy" harbour craft fleet is also from NL.  It's strange for us to see that.

I think it's not possible to compare a commercial ship payed private fund (Brittany Ferries) and Government funded ships. Here the Custom (Douane), Trinity House ( Phares et Balises) or Navy and auxiliary ships are built in France as public fund.  It is almost the same in the majority of large European countries except UK in fact.  

Xtian

Logged

Colin Bishop

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10,850
  • Location: SW Surrey, UK
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2012, 10:56:59 pm »

Xtian,

Yes, I agree that the UK should put more effort into retaining a shipbuilding capability but our politicians do not seem to think that it is important unfortunately. Once the skills are lost, it is very difficult to recover them. I recently travelled on the Queen Mary 2 which is a magnificent vessel. It was designed by a Briton but built in France as the UK no longer has the capability to build a ship like that. (It is owned by the Americans of course....)

I saw a report yesterday that the UK is seriously looking at buying the French Rafaele as its new carrier aircraft as the JSF costs are likely to be too high. It will be years before we again have a functional aircraft carrier yet our Government have jusr scrapped the last working one that we did have - Ark Royal.

I mentioned Brittany Ferries as they do ensure that they are French flagged and crewed and very good they are too. Their French built Bretagne is still the best in their fleet in my view, very well designed and executed.

Colin
Logged

Talisman

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2012, 11:22:20 pm »

I am perhaps over simplifying,  but ...

Our ship building decline on the Clyde came abouts as a hesitation / reluctance to embrace new technology.... So we were over taken.

Our work ethic is matched or bettered by the likes of the Polish .... evidence of that is they are taking up jobs we refuse..

Our skill and esteem probably still remains in part but we have forgotten how we made our name in the first place....

Hard work, determination and an eye on the future...

Welcome to Clyde Model Boats


I have a history of success & failing to draw on locally ... albeit on a larger scale .. but lessons i will personally not ignore!
Regards,
Kim
Logged

Nordsee

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2012, 04:56:51 pm »

Back in the late 70s I had shares in the then Townsend torreson Ferry Co. They wanted to buy three new Ferries, they gave the chance to British Shipyards but then decided to give the Order to the Dutch. The reasons? British Yards would not giove a Finish/Delivery date, nor a solid amount of costs, nor indeed when work could commence. The Dutch gave all 3, delivered on time and at the agreed price. Job done!That was why British Shipbuilding died, stupid 19th Century thinking by the Unions, who would rather see there Yards close than relax their Restrictive Work Practices.
Logged

pugwash

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2012, 06:35:05 pm »

Got to agree with you Nordsee - it was the same down in the Midlands at the Car factories. It had started years ago with the management ripping off the
work force - then the Unions got the power and their own back, and it ended up a murder/suicide pact between us and them  with everyone being the loser,
except our competitors overseas

Geoff
Logged

farrow

  • Guest
Re: HMS Warrior
« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2012, 10:43:11 pm »

In reply to Xtian, Out of the Naval Dockyards Pompey was the easiest to enter, also I remember a Chief Admiralty Pilot for Pompey who has since passed on, say that it was a pleasure to pilot the Iowa class. Because of their power to weight ratio and rudder system they handled much the same as a British GMD. Apart from the recent rebuild of the Jetties facing Gosport the biggest change since Victorian times is the rebuild of 3 basin which was once divided into three sections, the only clue left now is the Prom in the basin on the East side. The approach channel is also one of the deepest. I n Devonport you are restricted by the shallow channel through Smeaton Narrows, I remember a deep loaded Blue Rover could not sail on the low water tide, because there was a 2 metre high sea running and there was a fear she could hit the bottom. Chatham was also restricted by depth of water and also a very awkard double cross tidal current on the lock entrance and Rosyth had a awkward entrance and shallow approach plus a strong cross tide at the entrance to the approach channel.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up