Model Boat Mayhem - Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length.
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Thames sailing barge  (Read 16803 times)

andrewh

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3,064
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2007, 01:19:51 AM »

I am a Thames Barge enthusiast, full size and model

Kitty (free plan in MB) was my first boat ever - only 6 sails to control - she sails perfectly and is beautifully balanced

So 1/24th is what to aim for, 30 inch is a good size barge and will sail well.  Kitty at 24"(hull) is a lot of fun and goes in my Yaris rigged and 12 inch barges are probably lots of fun, but almost certainly quite sensitive to trim

I am contemplating a 1/10th version - control by small human with radio if necessary

andrew
Logged

wideawake

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2008, 11:59:10 AM »

Hi all

WRT Tony Williams - those not in AMBO may not know that Tony has sadly now died.   There's an obit in the latest edition of Bitts ands Bobs, the AMBO magazine.

Very sad news.  Hopefully someone else will be able to take on the range of barge hull mouldings that Tony made .

Tony Williams RIP

Guy
Logged

farrow

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2009, 10:47:31 PM »

Why not get some good photos and build from there, the vast majority of barges where never built from plans but a generic model which the builder used with variations to suit different trades. The average barge was about 82 feet by 21/2 feet beam and a moulded depth of 5ft 2inch's amidships (that was the figure for the Mirosia of Maldon. Rochester museum have two beautiful builders models and Edgar J March book on Spritsail Barges of the Thames and Medway has two plans in that, F.S Coopers book on "A Handbook of Sailing Barges" is brilliant on rigging and deck detail variations, you can rig out a full size barge with this book and he was one of the last Sailorman underway in trade. As for champion sailing barg's there was ever only 4 in this class in the late 1950's to the finish in 1962. There was a regulation for sailing barge matches in the Thames on size of spars, I believe the mainmast was about 34feet in length. But each builder had his own idea on how barge should be shaped and some had very fine lines with no transom in the water when deep loaded.
Logged

Greggy1964

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2009, 07:39:35 PM »

Edgar J March wrote a book in the 1940's entitled 'Spritsail Barges of Thames and Medway' (isbn 0877420068) and reprinted in 1970 ( isbn 0715346814)

The book covers the history of these sailing ships in detail including detailed plans and sketches ideal for ship models of this type covering construction, rigging and sail plans.

I can be still found but as it is a rare collectable book it is a bit pricey, though here in the UK it can be found in the public libraries.
Logged

Ivor Bittle

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #29 on: September 06, 2009, 07:02:22 PM »

I see that this topic has re-emerged.

There has been some criticism of the use of smaller models of barges. I am a member of AMBO and I regularly act as OOD for their sailing barge racing. I have seen the 30" class of barge evolve to become very competitive and, in my view, a very practical class. These boats will sail in quite heavy conditions and sail very commendably in the swirling winds that occur in the many model boating lakes that are surrounded by trees.

I have built two model barges, one a boom sail barge Pearl scaled up from Carr and the other a bowsprit barge to 1.24 scale. I have a web site that contains comprehensive section on the Thames sailing barge including an account of building bowsprit barge James Piper to 1/24 scale. It is at www.ivorbittle.co.uk

Ivor bittle
Logged

dreadnought72

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,865
  • Wood butcher with ten thumbs
  • Location: Airdrie, Scotland
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2009, 09:26:08 PM »

Ivor, I've really enjoyed your website in the past, but it's invisible to users of the Firefox browser, probably due to the spaces used in the page urls. Any chance of this excellent resource being fixed for FF users?

Regards,

Andy
Logged
Enjoying every minute sailing W9465 Mertensia

tigertiger

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7,021
  • Location: Kunming, city of eternal springtime, SW China.
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2009, 01:53:10 AM »

I also have a problem.

I am on IE8 (same issue on IE7)
I cannot see pics.

I am in China
I don't know if images are hosted on another site like Imageshack, which is blocked in China.
Logged
The only stupid question is the one I didn't ask

herrmill

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 392
  • Location: Hangzhou, "The Happiest City in China"
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2009, 09:43:23 AM »

Works fine on Safari.  No issues here!  :-))
Logged
"China is a sleeping giant. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the world." ~ Napoleon Bonaparte

Ivor Bittle

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2009, 05:42:17 PM »

Firefox.

I found out about this problem with Firefox only a few days ago. I sought help but we could not fix it.

I always use Google and so did not run into trouble.

I cannot help sadly.

Ivor Bittle


Logged

herrmill

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 392
  • Location: Hangzhou, "The Happiest City in China"
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #34 on: September 08, 2009, 10:48:09 AM »

Gents, if its ok with Mr. Bittle, I'd be more than happy to forward PDF copies of his website to anyone here who cannot access his site or view the images.  Not to belabor the joys of Mac ownership but it sure is nice to be able to print & save PDF copies of websites on the fly like this!  ok2

I have saved all chapters related to modeling the Thames barge which I've been using for reference towards my existing junk build & have printed the most relevant sections for shop use.  

Once again, I have to say thanks again to the author for such an informative website!   :-))

Chuck
Logged
"China is a sleeping giant. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the world." ~ Napoleon Bonaparte

KEMO

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #35 on: September 08, 2009, 07:43:06 PM »

Hi all

WRT Tony Williams - those not in AMBO may not know that Tony has sadly now died.   There's an obit in the latest edition of Bitts ands Bobs, the AMBO magazine.

Very sad news.  Hopefully someone else will be able to take on the range of barge hull mouldings that Tony made .

Tony Williams RIP

Guy
Hiya,
      I was looking up on Pilot Cutters the other day and came across this site

      www.tonyscottageboatyard.co.uk/index.htm

Keith.
Logged

Ivor Bittle

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #36 on: September 22, 2009, 04:44:09 PM »

My website,

I wrote it to help others to enjoy their modelling. Anything, short of making money from it, is fine by me.

Ivor Bittle
Logged

flundle

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #37 on: January 12, 2010, 10:35:39 PM »

I am getting seriously into Thames barges.
It all started when Speedline Models acquired the HFM kits of old and now I'm busy revamping them right now, starting with the Thames Barge.   
(The kit is staying much as it was except that now it has laser cut Perspex components instead of a printed bit of plasticard.  A new rudder (and extension for sailing) has been produced in laser-cut Perspex as have the new lee boards. Two little laser-cut lee-board winches with working gear sets and ruffle and a brailing winch with brakes and ruffle and an anchor winch made in the same way makes up the all the winches.  It's coming on well so won't be too long.

Anyway, apart from that, I am getting really into the idea of doing a kit for the James Piper. It looks nice and shopuld be fast???.  Plank on frame, all laser cut wood with etched brass components, brass blocks and stays sets and as much detail as possible.  I think I will do it in two scales, 1/24th of course and a 30" waterline version. What do you think?  I would love to know.
Many, many thanks to Ivor Bittle and to Richard Chesney for the inspiration! A brilliant site from Ivor and a brilliant data pack from Richard (AMBO).
The Thames barge is a big change from lifeboats and as yet, I know far too little about the subject but it will happen. I will be going to see some barges for real of course with my Brownie and will also be going to see some model barge racing, (yes, I am begging for an invite Jim).
AdrianG
Logged

Popeye

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 289
  • I see no ships!
  • Location: Upminster, Essex, England
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #38 on: January 13, 2010, 09:54:14 AM »

For flundle.

Consider joining the Thames Barge Trust - Google 'em - , and you'll be able to learn lots about these beautiful craft in addition to contributing to their preservation.

The Trust owns and operates two barges - 'Centaur' based at Paul's Wharf, Ipswich and 'Pudge' at Maldon, Essex,

Members benefit from   very cheap weekend cruises from late Spring  thru early Autumn. including participation in all East Coast  barge races, and can either chill out and enjoy the ride, or preferably , help sail the craft under the supervision of a resident qualified Master and Mate - much more enjoyable!

I hope the above info may be of use to you.



 
Logged
Confucius he say, 'if all else fails.......reach for the  Red Top-Stop'.

flundle

  • Guest
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #39 on: January 17, 2010, 08:14:54 PM »

Many thanks for the advice.  I have looked at their site and I will be joining.
A trip to see them should answer all my questions regarding the full size vessels.
Logged

Popeye

  • Full Mayhemer
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 289
  • I see no ships!
  • Location: Upminster, Essex, England
Re: Thames sailing barge
« Reply #40 on: January 17, 2010, 08:29:56 PM »

Many thanks for the advice.  I have looked at their site and I will be joining.
A trip to see them should answer all my questions regarding the full size vessels.


Should you not be familiar with Maldon ,it is famed for its numerous barges which can be seen  in all their glory throughout the year so don't forget to take your camera  whatever time of year you visit

PS The AMBO fraternity sail on the small riverside lake downstream of the barge berths.

PPS Both the  'Jolly Sailor' and the ' Queens Head' are adjacent to the barge berths and are essential watering holes. :-))
Logged
Confucius he say, 'if all else fails.......reach for the  Red Top-Stop'.
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up