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Author Topic: Would you drill into this ?  (Read 1294 times)

HawkEye

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Would you drill into this ?
« on: August 04, 2012, 02:14:57 PM »


I'm not a volcanologist but is it wise to drill 2.2 miles into a supervolcano even though they have apparently done it before ?  :o

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/03/us-italy-volcano-idUSBRE8720WI20120803







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I've never been so sure of something I wasn't sure of...

polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2012, 02:47:19 PM »


Dear Hawkeye,

It is highly unlikely that a problem would result, but a little does depend on the bore diameter.

The German geo surv. deep drilling research project in the late 1980's (to ten + kilometers), started the bore at apx. 30", with a gradual reduction as depth increased to 6" -. I note from the doc. report they say they will stop at a bore temp. of 500 degs., so, in theory, they are keeping a failsafe. If one was to drill such a bore in Iceland, it would not necessarily be a good idea, and holes for geothermal purposes have had lava being produced - instead of a nice hot rock to get steam from! :embarrassed: This didn't present too much of a prob. in this case, but, a bit does depend on pressures. To do such as is proposed in Italy at Yellow Stone, would not be such a good idea, true Super Volcanoe situations are best left alone. Italy's volcanoes are a good test bed actually (by their nature), but personally, I would still leave them alone..........

There is presently 'curiosity' why 'a lake' in Germany is bubbling gas from time to time. Don't forget GB was volcanic... Hellvelyn in the Lake District was a significant caldera once upon a long time ago... long since moved over a 'hot spot', but this area was extremely active when it was (Borrowdale volcanics and it's very high quality ash-slate and all that).

Regards, Bernard
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ACTion

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2012, 02:56:49 PM »

Not if the cost is as much per mm as my ruddy dentist charges!  :o
DM
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polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2012, 03:16:33 PM »


Just to add a bit. The German deep drilling project was in Germany to test drilling methods and to see conditions at great depth.

The Hellvelyn Caldera in the Lake District is bigger than you might think... when you think of the sq.miles of the volcanic lithologies present there (basically most of the Lake District). One might also include the Sill 'intrusions' underneath Durham and parts of Yorks., let alone the other granite/basalt areas of GB. GB was not without it's turmoil once upon a time! The Weardale lead/flourspar mines came across the Whin Sill at varying depths, but usually on avarage at 200 metres, however, in Teesdale, 'The Whin' outcrops, and was quarried for many years. All was uplifted one way and another during various geologic times, but in Durham/Yorks, the Limestone etc. gives a good indicative date line. Flourspar, being Calcium Flouride, is indicative of volcanic activity, and some of the 'vents' in Iceland have a nasty habit of ejecting nasty amounts flourine gas - which is highly toxic. In Weardale, granite os apx. 1 kilometer down (viz. the Rookhope Excpl.  Borehole), mid-Wales, it is estimated to be apx. the same, but funding to prove this has not been authorised thus far. Ireland, well the lithologies are well known, as also Scotland. What goes on between Anglesea and Ireland is another matter, but the Isle of Man is indicitive... though a bit northerly and nearer to the Leadhills of Scotland.

Redgards, Bernard
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polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2012, 03:27:54 PM »


Dear Dm,

Know what you mean! Was at same in Shrewsbury yesterday.

However, he knows me well enough to know that I know what's going on! He actually said yesterday, that I should do my own work as I am better than he at diagnosis!!! By this, I make clear, that I have regularly identified probs. that have sub. been proven by Xray! - and it was to this he was referring! Mind you, I decided after a bit of a molar came of the other week, followed by a bit of the filling of same, that yet another d  a  m  n gold crown is needed, and he concurs, so, sobeit. Experience has proven absolute, that, if in any doubt crown the d  a m  n thing, it saves so much trouble later on. Cost... at the end of the day cheap... one hold onto ones teeth, and the pain is less! :-))

Oh yes, and I have had a major super eruption, and it landed me in hospital for a week 2.5 years ago, and with the most excruciating pain possible to believe for a week before that... so believe you me, I know!!! <:( O0 :-))

Regards, Bernard

Regards, Bernard
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DavieTait

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2012, 03:46:51 PM »

You just have to look at East/Mid Lothians in Scotland , from North Berwick to Edinburgh all of the big lumps of land are extinct volcanoes including the islands in the Firth of Forth , Rockall 200 miles west of Stornoway is the remains of a volcano and there are hundreds over the mountain areas as well , still get hundreds of small earth tremors every year up the west coast

As for drilling into a volcano......... not a good idea
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polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2012, 04:16:50 PM »


Dear Davie,

Earth tremors in GB are (thankfully), nothing to do with volcanoes. Just normal faults shifting every now and again. In the vinicinty of volcanoes (uplifts, down shifts, and quakes), are indicitive of magma movement ('other things' are pertinent of course in such areas).

Regards, Bernard
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polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2012, 04:18:05 PM »

... vicinity... I should have spelt properly! :D
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wullie/mk2

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2012, 05:32:59 PM »

I'm not a volcanologist but is it wise to drill 2.2 miles into a supervolcano even though they have apparently done it before ?  :o

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/03/us-italy-volcano-idUSBRE8720WI20120803








Can,t be any more dangerous,than setting off an underground A-Bomb.....
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polaris

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Re: Would you drill into this ?
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2012, 07:51:56 PM »


Dear Wullie,

It is not a super volcanoe situation, it is a long standing one granted, and has proved itself to be very destructive in times long gone by. Maybe it will do so again, and it probably will, but, whether it's within all our lifetime remains to be seen. Perfectly capable of doing so completely unnanounced of course, and it could replicate what it's done before. However, the people and Govt. have permitted the construction of two significant Cities within it's past environs (derstruction), so, if they are happy with this, and are still prepared to live there, that is entirely up to them. Likewise, what the Italians care to do with it is their issue, and their issue alone, but drilling a hole in it will not in this instance initiate an explosion... possibly a vent (you can't simply pump barium mud down a bore like an oil well if one is dealing with magma), but a new vent is bound to materialise somewhere anyway at some stage... innevitable. A tiny bit of smoke in a field in Mexico resulted in one forming in the 1940's, and the same scenario will happen again... somewhere...............

Regards, Bernard
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