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Author Topic: Bow down  (Read 2303 times)

rickles23

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Bow down
« on: August 05, 2012, 02:28:00 PM »

Hi,
Today at our Model Expo I was given a yacht to look at.

Equipage America 60 Wooden R/C Yacht

According to the owner it sails bow down.

I have not tried a test float yet but I suspect two possibilities:

The battery pack position is too far forward

Or the sails/rigging is askew.

Any other ideas?

Regards
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tigertiger

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2012, 02:49:08 PM »

It depends what he means by 'sails bow down'.
If she floats bow down, then this is probably about weight distribution.

If he means that she is bow down when she runs with the wind  (wind pushing from the stern), that is about wind force. When my sailboat is carrying too much canvas for the wind conditions she will 'porpoise' when running. That is the bow will go under water. If the mast is too far forward this could make it worse, but your main concern then would be too much weather helm (she turns out of the wind too easily) and you will have problems tacking.
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Artistmike

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2012, 02:55:47 PM »

I don't know this boat but having looked at a couple of photos it looks like firstly that the mast step is a fixed position and secondly the weight on the keel is pre-fixed, so all you have to play with really is moveable weights like battery etc. .... It may be worth trying with moving that about before you try anything more drastic.......
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tigertiger

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2012, 07:18:34 PM »

It depends what he means by 'sails bow down'.
If she floats bow down, then this is probably about weight distribution.

If he means that she is bow down when she runs with the wind  (wind pushing from the stern), that is about wind force. When my sailboat is carrying too much canvas for the wind conditions she will 'porpoise' when running. That is the bow will go under water. If the mast is too far forward this could make it worse, but your main concern then would be too much weather helm (she turns out of the wind too easily) and you will have problems tacking.

To be more specific, sorry I was a bit vague.
If it is the former of the above, try moving the battery.

If it is the latter, and you are not racing, it is not a problem unless water comes in. Just don't sail in stronger winds.
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rickles23

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2012, 09:32:54 AM »

Hi and thank you for the replies.

Now I have had time to recover from the model expo I had a quick look inside the yacht and the only place for the battery is just forward of the middle of the lead bulb.

As stated the keel is fixed and the same with the mast.

I shall take it for a sail in the next day or two and see what it is doing.

Looking at the sails I suspect it is only for light wind conditions.

Regards
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tigertiger

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2012, 12:38:33 AM »

It is interesting that you say 'battery' in the singular.

Is this a heavy square wet battery (lead acid), or a lightweight battery. A lot of sail boats use a battery hold that holds 4 small batteries (AA). This weighs very little and is usually good for up to 8 hours sailing, depending on battery type, size of winch, and windspeeds.

If it is a big heavy battery, this can easily be swapped out.
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rickles23

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2012, 03:00:41 AM »

Hi,

Its the 4 small batteries (AA) battery pack.

Regards
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mrpenguin

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2012, 03:41:05 AM »


Looking at the sails I suspect it is only for light wind conditions.

Regards

Running too much sail for the wind conditions sounds likely....
If it is burying the bow (pitchpoling) when running with the wind, an easy fix is to lengthen backstay and shorten forestay / jib halyard, thus miving the mast top forward 25-40 mm. Can also be achieved by moving mast foot back if that adjustment is available to you.
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rickles23

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2012, 09:08:48 AM »

Hi mrpenguin,

That's what I was looking for....got it!

Regards
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mrpenguin

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2012, 04:32:15 AM »

@rickles23:
This is only a small boat (620 mm I think) - pitchpoling is likely to be an ongoing issue in all but light winds

If the boat is regularly used in anything more than light conditions, perhaps making a "B" rig for it may be an alternative to make it more manageable. The "B" rig would be a suit of sails with about 60% of the area of the original sails - leave the foot lengths about the same; just reduce the height. It will look a bit odd with quite a bit of mast above the top of the mainsail....

Sails for a small boat like this are pretty easily made using ripstop from a dressmakers shop - available in lots of nice colours and only costs a few dollars. Cut the ripstop on a piece of glass with a hot soldering iron - this will seal the edges and prevent fraying. Reinforce the corners with some suitable tape (eg gaffa tape or that grey plumbers stuff). Piece of cake, make yourself a set of sails for ten bucks....
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rickles23

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Re: Bow down
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2012, 08:59:55 AM »

Hi,
I will make a B rig for it and a storm rig.

I have a lot of materiel from an old kite maker, makes very good sails.

Regards
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