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Author Topic: Thames Workboat  (Read 26806 times)

Duckie

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2012, 12:58:53 PM »

See what you mean about time from your other build with Assurance Tug.
I like this one better, you are so talented,  I've never attempted a wooden boat, only kits and I'm not any where near your class of builder!!.
Great work will be keeping my eye on it.
Duckie
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Norseman

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2012, 02:37:15 AM »

Certainly very nice Tim

Dave
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2012, 12:47:51 AM »

Thanks everyone ...

I only follow what you tack sharp Gents are doing as best I can.
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2012, 04:01:39 PM »

Another post ...

Thanks all for the encouragement.

More done, even more more slow going, lots of little steps and details and scratch building.

Alot of brass pieces have to be made from raw stock and then treated with weathering chemicals along with fittings that have been purchased from various vendors, most conspicuously from Wet Goose Fittings.

Installed ventilation gratings in the equipment storage lockers as well as hinges for the lockers aft interior access door.

For deck access hatch/skylight done, trimmed with brass strips and treated.

Brass strips used for the engine access cover by the pilot's station as well as the steereage access cover ( servo access in this case ).

Front and back grab rails done, pegged to deck with brass dowels.

Putting off the cabin roof till last, not sure of a plan there yet at all.



































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sailorboy61

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2012, 04:17:45 PM »

Excellent work, top quality.

I want to make one, great looking little boat that!
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longshanks

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #30 on: October 03, 2012, 10:26:05 PM »

Great build Tim  :-))

Couple of questions for you

What chemicals are you using to age brass?

I love your planking of the cockpit floor - how have you achieved the weathered / bleached look ?

Keep up the good work.
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Neil

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #31 on: October 04, 2012, 11:26:15 AM »

it's looking superb Tim.......I especially like all the woodwork also.
it's a throw back to the 1930's and all those little ships that so valiently went to Dunkirk in 1940.

superb.
neil.
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #32 on: October 20, 2012, 03:41:29 AM »

Thanks Mates, An update:

Thought I better stop buying boat models and actually work on one for a change

The chemicals for aging the brass: " blacken it" is the trade name.

Using some old wood stain that was lyin about to "age" the wood.

Details on the cabin are coming together, inner and outer trim pieces are mostly done, not sure if I am gonna paint or stain the outer part of the bridge.

"Windows" are cut and shaped but wont go in till later.

The first layer of the bridge roof is on, needs trimming to shape after the Z-poxy has set up ( this is Not the final shape ).

Ships wheel and control console done, put down some floor grating where the pilot would stand to keep boots dry.

Steerage access and engine access hatches have had lift/lock rings put on, they are brass etched parts.

Put some weathered brass bolts in the rub rails to show where they would be secured to the hull.

Portholes are mounted but no "glass" yet as a a coat of matte spray may be applied after final weathering is done.

Getting there, though a long way to go.






























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spongie

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #33 on: October 20, 2012, 08:38:16 AM »

WOW... I've worked on old wooden boats like this and your model is so realistic!!!!
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derekwarner

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2012, 10:36:20 AM »

Hi Tim B.       

The limed deck planking when viewed is near life like......  congratulations  :-))

I am not sure about the horizontal planking within the hull...... {:-{ .....Derek

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Derek Warner

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Norseman

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #35 on: October 20, 2012, 01:24:49 PM »

not sure about the horizontal planking within the hull

It does make for nice contrasts, I really like it, but as I have no hands on knowledge of the type it's only my opinion.
Anyone got some typical photos within a hull?

Regards Dave
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2012, 02:05:56 PM »

Good morning Gents, Thanks for the encouragement.

On the matter of the horizontal planking inside, it was counterintuitive to me to orient the planks laterally as I did, but in researching I found only solid panels of wood or horizontal planks.

The solid panels were found only on small boats or large Very expensive boats, the high cost of large sheets of marine grade wood being prohibitive.

Tim





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derekwarner

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2012, 03:06:53 PM »

Again Tim B.......

1. the limed wash on the deck planking is life like.....  :-))....
2. the green tarnished surface on the brass/bronze fittings is also life like :-))
3. the horizontal internal planking is questionable. :(( ......it should be vertical....... O0

Derek
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John W E

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2012, 03:35:26 PM »

hi there

totally agree with what Derek has said regarding the realistically looking planking - having worked on several river boats on the Tyne - May I make a comment.   Although the wheelhouse area was generally panelled similar to this model - on the well kept boats - on the very hard worked boats - there was generally no panelling, especially in the aft working area of the boat - from the wheel house to the stern.

The reason for this is work boats generally carried a variety of things, steel; rope; engine spares - you name it - it carried it , depending on what the boat was enlisted to do and this panelling would be damaged, broken and become quite a hazard.   The other reason panelling wasnt liked in the working area, is, if the hull was damaged (which they quite often were) it made life a lot easier to get to the area to either plug or patch the damaged area.A lot of workboats lived a terrible life as far as maintenance was concerned - i.e. the bare minimum was done on them to keep them afloat - when they werent working they werent making money and the owners didnt spend much on them - thats why the fenders are usually old tyres, old ropes anything they could lay their hands on.

I could tell you about a diver who worked his boat on the Tyne and it was the old fashioned diver with a 'hard helmet type diver'.

Keep up the good work its a lovely build this one.

aye
john
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2012, 04:44:41 AM »

I appreciate the perspectivs Gents, all I could do was build to the plans done by a Mr. Pottinger ( you may or may not have heard of him ).

have a look at the plans, he defines a "liner" that drops down in the hull, surrounded by a walkway / deck thusly concealing the inside frames of the boat and preventing the Sea from coming in.

I had heard that Mr. Pottinger was a well known and respected model boat ( and plane ) designer so I felt comfortable in following his pattern.

My only option at this point would be to re-cover the horizonatlly planked rear part of the insert with a sheet of veneer, that wouldnt be so hard.

Going without the liner at all to expose the inner part of the hull ( as in this pic ) ?

may as well start over.



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derekwarner

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #40 on: October 21, 2012, 05:36:20 AM »

Tim......if you wished you certainly could vertically re plank the internals without removing any of existing material

As bluebird has suggested,........many Thames workboats would have been a little rough & tumble so this allows you a wide scope in designers licence

I am faced with a similar scenario some where down the track in that my build was never planned or intended to make the hull internals visible......but that now is a must <*<

Derek 
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Derek Warner

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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #41 on: October 21, 2012, 04:31:26 PM »

Understood ...

And how wide otter these vertical planks be ( in scale ) ?

They are @ 5 inch wide now ( in scale ), I could see much wider than that, as much as 1 foot ( and now they would no longer be though of as planks, but remoeveable panels for access to the inner hull )
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John W E

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #42 on: October 21, 2012, 04:42:28 PM »

hi there Tim

Here's a thought for ya, leave the panelling in the working area after the boat; what you could is cut some small oblong panels; same length and size as your seat locker hatches and stick these on the panelling to represent side wall hatches - to enable access to the innards.   I have seen that done as well.   That's one thought.

Jim Pottinger used to build models too and he may well have gone back to that now - but I think he may concentrate on draftsmanship of model boat plans....he used to frequent the forum and he may well still do so.   Anyway, I have built several models from his plans and some of them are documented on this website such as the Frederique Spashette (you can find it in the masterclass builds - and somewhere else on this forum) was the Sea Lady, side trawler build and the tug MSC Archer, built in pics.   Jim Pottinger has a good catalogue of plans - if you find his email address (which I think I may have somewhere - and will try and find) he will possibly email you a list of the plans that he has.

aye
john e
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #43 on: October 29, 2012, 05:56:39 PM »

pesky planks   Okay, the planking inside the cabin insert is no longer visible.

I covered over it with oak veneer then stained, put in deviders between would~be removeable panels that could come off for access to the hull interior on a real boat.

I will add details later that may improve the appearance.

I am fortunate enough now to be communicating with the creator of the plans, a Mr. J. Pottinger
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #44 on: October 30, 2012, 01:52:03 PM »

I have compressed the pics I tried to add, I am still unable to post ANY images.
It seems this is the end of my posting on this site, at least for now !
Cheers all, and thanks for the help.
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DickyD

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2012, 02:00:41 PM »

If you use photo bucket to apply photos you will have no problem
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2012, 04:36:07 PM »

I will try that ...
Though I have already compressed them to the minimum here ( 640X480 ), and have been posting them "as is" this whole time in full density ..
I just now tried again, it loads to about 80% then the window closes, so they are not loading to 100% no matter what density.
There be no message/warning that the pics are too dense, it just doesn't follow through, shows "obtaining preview" ( used to show "fetching preview" ).
I will open a photobucket account.
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Tug-Kenny

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2012, 08:37:56 PM »


I've just done an experiment on Adobe Photoshop and resized a picture to 640x480 .  The picture becomes 900k in the memory.

This is too large for this site but if I save it for 'web use' in a GIF format it becomes 155k  which is suitable for this forum.

I enclose a picture of Titanic to see if it will work.

Cheers

Ken

ps
 I've just seen the result and it's quite a large picture  (for me)  as I usually set them lower down to around 90k

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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2012, 09:10:35 PM »

Here we go then ...
 
So, I've tried 90K, now the "% " of download complete doesn't even show anymore , the grey bar gets to about half way during download and the whole "add image to post" window closes by itself without any message at all ...
 
I'm afraid I'm adrift mates ...
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Tim B.

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Re: Thames Workboat
« Reply #49 on: October 30, 2012, 09:21:41 PM »

Here's a Tug pic, 105K bytes , avitar format...
 
I am not able to complete the download....
Most annoying, something's afoot with the software Sure.
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