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Author Topic: Building a static 1765 English Frigate  (Read 46630 times)

Bob K

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #100 on: March 24, 2013, 10:21:55 PM »

Exquisite  :-))    Take care and get well soon.
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #101 on: March 25, 2013, 10:02:34 PM »

Upper Foremast, outer forestay installed.  Now its back to ratlin work on those upper shrouds.
Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #102 on: March 29, 2013, 01:56:00 PM »

Well dear folks, its that time of year once again.  Temps are pushing back up towards 70 and I'm in the process of waking my wood shop up.  I have a 15ft sailing skiff to build, so need to get cracking.  This means suspending the Frigate build until winter comes.  I'll do one last post once I finish ratline work on the foremast upper and then its time to shut the indoor shop down and give the desk back to my first mate.
I have endured a full knee replacement and a bout with cancer and have survived.  Life is good, so much to do and I hope enough time to do it.
Best to all, I'll be lurking, enjoy your projects and sailing this summer.
Regards and Fairwinds,
Dennis
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mrpenguin

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #103 on: March 29, 2013, 10:03:12 PM »

Dennis, good to hear that you are going Ok.

You may recall my earlier post of the Recycle Boat inspired from your fantastic build... The competition closed today, so I can publish my entry. Here are links to a couple of YouTube videos of the completed project. It has been great fun to build, very different to your detailed work (and much rougher!), but it is a functioning ship....  In the finish, my biggest challenge was learning how to sail it - VERY different to the usual sloop rigs...

Build and sailing - https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=zZGjFR5CYUE
Onboard detail - https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=sTj-aqYUX9g

Thank you for your inspiration!!!
 
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #104 on: March 30, 2013, 04:19:32 PM »

Thanks for sharing the visuals on the Eco ship.  Most interesting and amazingly real looking out on the water.  The physics and hydrodynamics for models with regard to ballast and control surfaces amaze me as well.  I have looked into a limited amount of fluid dynamics and I guess its a molecular issue... same thing happens with model airplanes when you are talking scale.  But hey, I'm no expert and you do what you gotta do to get her to go!  Sailing a square rigged ship has its own set of rules for sure.  Isn't tacking called "wearing around"? But, it looks like you got the hang of it and doing reverse was a gas :-))   I'm still doing ratlin work.. seems to go on forever.. all those clove hitches.
Regards,
Dennis
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SailorGreg

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #105 on: April 03, 2013, 09:20:05 AM »

Dennis,

Tacking and wearing round are both methods of changing course to change the tack the ship is sailing on, but differ in the way they achieve this.  Imagine a ship sailing as close to the wind as it can and wishing to sail on the other tack.  The  shortest distance method is to turn into the wind so that half way through the manoeuvre the wind is blowing straight onto the bow.  There is obviously no drive from the sails at this point, and the skipper relies on the momentum of the ship to carry it round until the sails fill on the other tack.  This is "tacking".

For all sailing craft, but for square riggers in particular, tacking can fail if the windage (or drag) of the rig stops the ship before it has passed the half way mark of this manoeuvre.  The ship now loses control and, if in confined waters, can quickly get into trouble.  One way to prevent this is to turn the other way, away from the wind, and perform a large circle manoeuvre.  Half way through this manoeuvre the wind is blowing directly onto the stern of the ship and of course the ship retains drive and steerage all the time.  The huge disadvantage is that the ship loses a large amount of distance  as it has turned away from its intended  course.  This is "wearing round" and is safer and surer but needs much more time and space to perform.

I hope that has clarified things and not just confused the issue!

Greg

mrpenguin

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #106 on: April 04, 2013, 01:43:44 AM »

Re tacking a square rigger - further to Greg's comments, I can confirm that it is a bit of a challenge to get a square rigger to turn through the wind, as shown in my video previously linked a few posts back.....
To tack a square rigger through the wind goes something like this - you get a bit of headway up so you have some inertia to help drive the boat through the move. Then you set the foremast sails parallel to the wind so they do not block the move and swing the rudder so the boat turns the bow to the wind. As the bow comes round into the wind, the wind pushes on the front of the square sails, stopping any forward motion and driving the boat backwards. With a combination of the correct rudder (opposite) to encourage the stern through the manoeuvre and at the same time angling the foremast square sails so they push the bow further around through the turn, a tack can be completed. Once the bow is far enough round that the jib sails can finish bringing the bow around, all square sails are set for the new course.
The manoeuvre is also known as a "box turn", and is something similar to doing a three point turn with a car in a narrow street....
(Apologies for off topic Dennis)
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #107 on: April 04, 2013, 05:21:23 AM »

Hey, thanks gentlemen, this is interesting stuff and very much adds to the topic.  Sailing a square rigged ship takes a certain technique both in models and real life.  I always thought they could only "wear" a ship around to get her on a new tack.  I was aware that they used the sails to "stop" the ship when docking.. and they did dock under sail!  Amazing.
I'm nearing the end of the Fore Mast top standing rigging and will provide pics soonly, then I must move into my outside shop as that skiff build is well underway now.  I'll be lurking and keeping a watchful eye on you guys.  %)
Cheers,
Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #108 on: April 10, 2013, 08:18:10 PM »

Well folks, I'm done with the Frigate build for the summer.  I have completed the upper foremast standing rigging and have moved on to building a 15ft sailing skiff.  I will resume in the fall continuing on with the same on the main and mizzen masts.  In the meantime, you folks have a wonderful summer sailing and building.
Fairwinds,
Dennis
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Capt Podge

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #109 on: April 11, 2013, 12:01:44 AM »

So, now we have something to look forward to later in the year - thanks again for postings to date Dennis.  :-))
 
 
Regards,
 
Ray.
 
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Saylee

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #110 on: September 26, 2013, 05:26:24 AM »

OK, Dennis, winter's knockin' on the door in the drippy PNW. I'm thinking it's time for another update soon!  :}
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #111 on: September 26, 2013, 06:22:52 AM »

Well, howdy once again dear folks.  Must say its been a 'very' difficult summer for me physically, but it appears that I'm getting through it all.  Just a quick status update.  Yes, winter is barking its ugly head and will arrive soon in the great NW.  I'm busy with a 15ft sailing skiff build which will not complete this year, but is close.  I do enjoy building full scale in my shop, but also long for the model work which should commence in a month or sooner.  I know its off topic for this group, but here is a picture of my current project.  See you all soon.
Regards,
Dennis
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mrpenguin

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #112 on: September 26, 2013, 06:32:37 AM »

I think I see why it is taking so long..... There is an extra tool!!!
 
A two door refrigerator with an ice maker..... That's my sort of workshop!!!
 
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Bob K

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #113 on: September 26, 2013, 09:17:55 AM »

Lovely skiff Dennis, built with same quality and attention to detail as your smaller scale "models".
Best wishes.
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #114 on: September 26, 2013, 03:58:25 PM »

I confess, the gig is up...... actually, that is where I get my ice water.


Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #115 on: October 13, 2013, 11:45:18 PM »

Ok folks, I'm back.  Skiff is put up for the winter and my model shop is setup and ready to go.  Next is to build the main top mast and install.  Stay tuned.
Best regards,
Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #116 on: October 13, 2013, 11:47:39 PM »

Just for the fun of it.  Got my skiff loaded to her trailer before storing for winter.  I'm happy with the way she turned out.
Dennis (I don't know who that old guy is standing there)
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #117 on: October 15, 2013, 07:35:17 PM »

Ok folks, just so you know I'm not slackin.... got the main top mast roughed in.
Dennis
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Footski

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #118 on: October 15, 2013, 08:59:31 PM »

I love it.. :-))
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Saylee

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #119 on: October 16, 2013, 04:28:42 AM »

Dennis,

Beautiful woodwork on the skiff! I'm currently restoring an 8' f/g dink which needs all rub rails, etc replaced around the entire perimeter of the gunwhales plus a few other bits. Perhaps when the time is right, you might allow me the privilege of picking your brain for a few tips on getting the best results. Right now I'm just trying to wrap my head around how to bend the strips when I have no vessels remotely big enough, never mind even what wood to choose in the first place.  :embarrassed:

In the meantime I'll be watching your continued frigate build closely. I've been contemplating building a static square rigger for about a year now. Going to try a kit for my first attempt and have been looking at quite a few. Should have one picked out soon.

Cheers from Port Gardner
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #120 on: October 16, 2013, 10:29:59 PM »

Thankyou sir, no problem.  Anyone can contact me at dllbjl@comcast.net for any off topic stuff or whatever. There are a number of fine kits available for static square riggers.  ModelExpo comes to mind.
Ok, Trestletrees and Crosstress have been installed.  Used brass sheves for future yard running rigging.
Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #121 on: October 16, 2013, 10:32:24 PM »

Oops, forgot the pic I wanted to include.
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Saylee

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #122 on: October 17, 2013, 02:56:17 AM »

Thankyou sir, no problem...
Thanks for reaching out. I'll be in touch!
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #123 on: October 17, 2013, 07:56:17 PM »

Main top in.
Dennis
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dlancast

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Re: Building a static 1765 English Frigate
« Reply #124 on: October 17, 2013, 08:04:41 PM »

Gee, the trees look crooked, they are not.  Here is another shot.
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